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TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY 



OF 



ENGLAND, 



COMPRISING THE 



SEVERAL COUNTIES, CITIES, BOROUGHS, CORPORATE AND MARKET TOWNS, 

PARISHES, AND TOWNSHIPS, 
AND THE ISLANDS OF GUERNSEY, JERSEY, AND MAN, 



HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL DESCRIPTIONS 



AND EMBELMSHEU WITH 



ENGRAVINGS OF THE ARMS OF THE CITIES, BISHOPRICS, UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, CORPORATE TOWNS, 
AND BOROUGHS; AND OF THE SEALS OF THE VARIOUS MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS. 



BY SAMUEL LEWIS. 



dftftfi iBirtttom 



IN FOUR VOLUMES. 
VOL. I. 



LONDON: 
PUBLISHED BY S. LEWIS AND CO., 13, FINSBURY PLACE, SOUTH. 



M.DCCC.XLV. 




lAJiOOSLOT 






PREFACE. 



IN publishing a FIFTH EDITION of the TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND, embracing a 
description of each county, city, town, parish, and township in the kingdom, together with 
notices of the islands of Man, Guernsey, Jersey, &c., the Proprietors consider it necessary to 
make a few brief remarks for the information of those Subscribers who may not have seen the 
more explanatory Preface to the First edition. 

With a view to secure a well-condensed and accurate account of every place possessing 
either civil or ecclesiastical jurisdiction, several gentlemen of competent talents and industry 
were originally engaged to make a general survey of the kingdom, and procure, by personal 
examination, the fullest information upon the different subjects contemplated in the plan of 
the work; their inquiries being facilitated by printed questions, including every particular 
to which their attention was to be directed. And the Proprietors beg to return their 
unfeigned thanks for the courtesy uniformly extended to their agents, during the time they 
were employed in their pursuit ; and gratefully to acknowledge the prompt assistance re- 
ceived from the resident nobility, gentry, and clergy, and persons holding official situations, 
many of whom transmitted original manuscripts, containing much highly valuable matter 
never before published. 

It was at first intended that the work should be confined simply to a topographical and 
statistical account of the various districts ; but considering that a summary of the history of such 
places as either are, or have been, of importance, would render it more comprehensive and 
interesting, it was determined to introduce a concise narrative of the principal events which 
mark their progress from their origin to the present time ; and to effect this, other gentlemen 



iv PREFACE. 

were entrusted with the task of selecting from general and local histories, authentic records, 
and manuscripts at the British Museum, and other public libraries, notices of the most 
remarkable occurrences connected with each spot. 

Since the publication of the last edition of the Dictionary, the Proprietors have received 
from the gentry and clergy resident in different parts of the country, several thousands of 
communications, enabling them to embody much additional information, and to correct 
many statements which had become erroneous in consequence of the lapse of time, or from 
changes that had subsequently occurred; and to the parochial clergy, especially, they are 
deeply indebted for the contribution, in detail, of those facts with which they are necessarily 
best acquainted. In addition to these sources, the Proprietors have availed themselves of the 
opportunity of noticing in the present edition, where needful, the multifarious alterations 
caused by recent legislative enactments, whereof the principal are, the Act of the 2nd and 3rd 
William IV., c. 45, by which the system of parliamentary representation was remodelled, and 
new electoral divisions were formed ; the Poor Law Act, by which the country was divided into 
unions ; the Act relating to Episcopal Dioceses and Patronage ; the Municipal Corporations' 
Act, which rendered the constitution and mode of government of the corporate bodies connected 
with about one hundred and seventy of the most distinguished places in England, totally 
different ; and the Tithes' Commutation Act. And diligent use has also been made of some of 
the Reports that have been printed under the authority of Parliament, or of Commissions, 
including the last-published volumes of the Reports of the Charities' Commissioners, whose 
labours have been recently completed in 37 folio volumes ; and the Report of the Commis- 
sioners appointed by his late Majesty to inquire into the Ecclesiastical Revenues. Another 
feature in this new Edition is, the introduction of the acreage of nearly every parish, given on 
the authority of statements forwarded by resident persons with whom the Proprietors have 
communicated ; which information is rendered more important, as the returns of government, in 
consequence of the nature of the sources from which they are derived, are for the most part 
exceedingly inaccurate, and form but an approximation to the real facts. 

The arrangement of the different places is strictly alphabetical, each being given under its 
proper name, and the epithet, if any, by which it is distinguished from another locality of the 
same designation, following after the chief heading : and the ensuing order of subjects, when the 
topics are noticed in the work, has been generally adopted : 1. Name of the place, and of the 
saint to whom the church is dedicated ; situation ; population, according to the census of 1841 ; 
origin, and etymology of name ; summary of historical events, whether of a national or particular 



PREFACE. v 

kind. 2. Local description ; distinguishing features of surface ; soil ; number of acres, &c. ; 
mines and quarries; scientific and literary institutions; sources of amusement; commerce, 
trade, and manufactures ; facilities afforded by rivers, railroads, canals, &c. ; markets and fairs. 
3. Municipal government ; privileges and immunities ; courts of justice, prisons, &c. ; parlia- 
mentary representation. 4. Ecclesiastical and religious establishments; particulars respecting 
livings, tithes, glebe, patronage; description of churches; dissenters' places of worship. 5. 
Scholastic and charitable foundations and endowments ; benevolent institutions ; hospitals ; 
almshouses. 6. Monastic institutions; antiquities; mineral springs; natural phenomena; 
eminent natives and residents ; title which the place confers. 

The Maps accompanying the work are derived from the best authorities, corrected up to 
the present time, and are printed from steel plates. The Arms and Seals of the several cities, 
boroughs, corporate towns, bishoprics, universities, colleges, &c., have been drawn and engraved 
from impressions in wax, furnished by the respective corporate bodies ; and although they have 
generally been either enlarged, or reduced, to one size, for the sake of uniformity, yet great 
care has been taken to preserve, in each instance, an exact fac-simile of the original ; the 
difficulty of effecting which, from the mutilated state of many of the seals, was kindly removed 
by Sir George Nayler, and other gentlemen at the Heralds' College, who also furnished the 

Arms of some of the towns. 

> * 

The Proprietors cannot entertain the hope that, in a work compiled from such a variety of 
sources, and containing notices so numerous and diversified, errors have not occurred ; indeed, 
the information, even when collected upon the spot, from the most intelligent persons, has 
frequently been so contradictory as to require much labour and perseverance to reconcile and 
verify it. They have, however, regardless of expense, used the most indefatigable exertions to 
attain correctness, and to render the work as complete as possible ; and they, therefore, trust 
that any occasional inaccuracy will receive the indulgence of the Subscribers. 

The Proprietors had flattered themselves that this publication, the first edition of which 
exclusively occupied them nearly six years, at an outlay of more than FORTY-EIGHT THOUSAND 
POUNDS, would have escaped the depredation of piracy ; but the result has been otherwise, and 
they have been compelled, in more than one instance, to seek the protection of the Court of 
Chancery : in the case relating to Messrs. Fullarton, of Glasgow, and King Square, London, 
the following Judgment was given by the Master of the Rolls : 



vi PREFACE. 



LEWIS versus FULLARTON. 



JUDGMENT DELIVERED BY THE MASTER OF THE ROLLS, JULY 16, 1839. 



IN this case the plaintiffs moved for an injunction to restrain the defendant, his agents, servants, and workmen, 
from further printing, publishing, selling, or delivering, or otherwise disposing of any copies of a book called 
" A NEW and COMPREHENSIVE GAZETTEER of ENGLAND and WALES," published by the defendant, or any part 
thereof. The plantiffs are the publishers of a work called " LEWIS'S TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY of ENG- 
LAND : " it was prepared for publication at a very great expense, and with great literary assistance, and, according 
to the evidence, I think, consists partly of compilations and selections of former works, and partly of original 
compositions, obtained at their own cost ; and the plaintiffs allege, as to such parts of their work as consisted of 
compilations and selections, those parts have been subjected to investigation and inquiry in the localities to which they 
relate. There is no doubt but that a work of this nature may be the subject of copyright, and on consideration 
of the evidence adduced in this case, / am clearly of opinion that for the purposes of this motion I must consider the 
plaintiffs as entitled to the copyright which they claim. The first edition of the plaintiffs' work was published in the 
month of May, 1831. It seems that some of the copies were corrected or varied in passing through the press, so 
that there are some differences between the copies of the plaintiffs' work which constituted their first edition. A 
second edition was published in December, 1833, and a third in June, 1835. The printing of the defendant's 
work commenced in the month of June, 1832, and it was completed in May, 1834. The plaintiffs having obtained a 
considerable sale for their work, were informed, about the end of the year 1837, that the sale was interfered with 
by a Scotch work ; in February, 1838, they were informed that this Scotch work was the defendant's Gazetteer ; 
and on an examination of the work about June, 1838, the plaintiffs, as they allege, first discovered the piracy 
of which they now complain, and against which they seek to be protected. It has been endeavoured to be 
shown, on the part of the defendant, that the plaintiffs must have been aware of the publication, contents, and 
nature of the defendant's work at a much earlier period, and ought to be now precluded from asking for an injunc- 
tion by their own laches in not asking for relief sooner ; but on reading the evidence as to this point, I think it 
appears, although they had previously been informed of the title of the defendant's publication, they did not 
know the character and contents of it till June, 1838, and as the bill was filed in the following month, there does 
not appear to have been any improper or unnecessary delay. 

On a comparison of the two works it appears, and has necessarily been admitted, that a considerable portion of 
the matter which is contained in the plaintiffs' work has found its way into the work of defendant, for the de- 
fendant insists that, with respect to such parts of the plaintiffs' work as are not original, he had a right to go to 
the sources to which the plaintiffs had previously resorted ; that with respect to such parts of the plaintiffs' 
work as are original, a lawful use only has been made of them : the compiler, it is said, has taken nothing animo 
furandi, but made only a fair use of a former publication on the subject of his own subsequent work. It is said 
the defendant's work was undertaken by his late father, who employed Mr. James Bell to prepare it for the 
press ; that Mr. Bell was supplied with a great number of topographical and other works, and amongst others with 
the plaintiffs' Topographical Dictionary ; that a fair use was made of all, and the plaintiffs have no right to com- 
plain of what has been done. Any man is entitled, no doubt, to write and publish a Topographical Dictionary, 
and to avail himself of the labours of all other writers whose works are not protected by copyright, und of 
all public sources of information ; but whilst all are entitled to the common sources of information, none are 
entitled to save themselves trouble and expense by availing themselves, for their own profit, of other men's works, 
still entitled to the protection of copyright ; and the question is, whether Mr. Bell did or did not, for the compi- 
lation of the work in which he was engaged, avail himself of the plaintiffs' work unlawfully and in violation of 
the plaintiffs' copyright ; for the purpose of ascertaining which, I have read over a very considerable number of 
articles in both works (the trouble of comparing them has been greatly diminished by the exhibits prepared on 



PREFACE. vii 

both sides), and in the result, the examination appears to me to show that Mr. Bell, in the compilation of 
his Gazetteer, has extensively, and as far as my examination has gone it would not be too much to say habitually, 
made use of all that suited his purpose in the plaintiffs' work. It is evident that in a large proportion of the 
defendant's work no other labour has been employed than in copying the plaintiffs' work, and arranging the matter in a 
form which best suited the purpose of the compiler. Mr. Bell evidently did not think himself under any restraint, 
and probably did not think that the plaintiffs were entitled to copyright ; and if that which he did could be con- 
sidered as lawfully done, it is plain no protection whatever could be given to any work in the nature of a Gazet- 
teer, Dictionary, Road Book, Calendar, or Map, or any other work the subject-matter of which is open to common 
observation and inquiry ; and every man who had bestowed any amount of labour or expense in collecting and 
arranging information necessary and requisite for the production of such a work, might immediately on its publication 
be deprived of the fruit of his industry and ability. 

Having gone carefully through all the articles commented on in the argument, and several others, / am 
of opinion the defendant's work is to a very considerable extent a piracy of the plaintiffs' copyright ; to what extent, it 
is not fully or accurately ascertained ; and it appears to me there are parts of the defendant's work, which, as a 
publication of this nature, may justly be considered as original ; certainly there are parts which are not taken 
from the plaintiffs' work, and as to which, if they stood alone, the plaintiffs could have no right to an injunction ; 
and under these circumstances, the difficulty which pressed on the mind of Lord Eldon, in the case of Marvman 
v. Tegg, arises in the present case. What was true in that case cannot be altogether denied in the present case ; 
that notwithstanding all the pains which have been used, the inquiry as to how much has been pirated has left us 
in a great degree to conjecture, or rather we are left to conclude, from passages shown to have been copied from 
the original work, how much may have been so copied ; and if this Court is to say, as Lord Eldon appears 
to have intimated, that the Court ought not to grant an injunction against the whole or the pirated parts of 
a work without first ascertaining, either by its own inspection, or otherwise, what was the quantity of matter 
pirated, then, undoubtedly, it would follow an injunction ought not now to be granted ; for this reason only, that 
though a considerable part of the work appears to have been copied, yet as the two have not been compared in 
every part, it does not appear on the whole how much has been copied, or on the whole what parts of the defend- 
ant's work may, with regard to the plaintiffs' work at least, be considered as original. In the case I have men- 
tioned, Lord Eldon made a very special order. I cannot help entertaining some doubt whether that order could 
have been acted on with advantage ; the parties, however, did not prosecute it, and the report adds, the suit was 
compromised by the payment of a considerable sum of money from the defendant to the plaintiff. I conceive 
when it has been once ascertained that the defendant has in any degree violated the right of the plaintiff, the 
nature and extent of the order to be made must depend on the circumstances of the case, and the amount and 
extent of the evidence adduced. The piracy proved may be so inconsiderable, and so little likely to injure the 
plaintiff, that the Court may decline to interfere at all, and leave the plaintiff to his remedy at law : or the piracy 
proved may be so extensive, in a greater or less degree, as to leave it extremely doubtful whether the parts not 
examined are in any degree piratical, or to make it more or less probable they have been composed in the same 
manner, and collected from the like sources, as the parts which have been examined, and are in an equal degree 
liable to the charge of piracy. The hardship of restraining the publication of the whole of a work, when part of 
it consists of original matter, has always been urged in, cases of this nature, and the answer which is given 
by Lord Eldon in the case to which 1 have referred, seems conclusive. He expresses himself thus : " As to the 
hard consequences which would follow from granting an injunction when a very large proportion of the work is 
unquestionably original, I can only say, that if the parts which have been copied cannot be separated from those 
which are original without destroying the use and value of the original matter, he who has made an improper use 
of that which did not belong to him must suffer the consequences of so doing. If a man mixes what belongs to 
him with what belongs to me, and the mixture be forbidden by the law, he must again separate them, and he must 
bear all the mischief and loss which the separation may occasion. If an individual chooses, in any work, to mix 
my literary matter with his own, he must be restrained from publishing the literary matter which belongs to me ; 
and if the parts of the work cannot be separated, and if by that means the injunction which restrained the publi- 
cation of my literary matter prevents also the publication of his own literary matter, he has only himself to 
blame." It must be observed, also, that in cases of this nature nothing but an injunction can sufficiently 
or effectually protect the injured party ; and in the same case Lord Eldon observes, " that though keeping an 
account of the profits may prevent the defendant from deriving any profit, as he may be ultimately obliged to 
account to the plaintiff for all his gains, yet if the work which the defendant is publishing in the mean time really 
affects the sale of the work which the plaintiff seeks to protect, the consequence is that the rendering the profits 



viii PREFACE. 

of the former work to the complaining party may not be a satisfaction to him for what he might have been 
enabled to have made of his own work, if it had been the only one published ; for he would argue, that the profits of 
the defendant, as compared with the profits which he, the plaintiff, has been improperly prevented from making, could 
only be in the proportion of the price of a copy of the one book to the price of a copy of the other ;" and on the whole, 
for the reasons I have stated, it appears to me that an injunction ought to be granted whenever it appears by sufficient 
evidence that a copyright exists, and that piracy has been committed to an extent which is likely to be seriously 
prejudicial to the plaintiff"; and that the extent of the injunction must depend on the amount of proof and the nature of 
the proof. 

The plaintiffs, in the present case, ask for an injunction to restrain the defendant from publishing the whole or 
any part of the defendant's Gazetteer. As it appears by the evidence that there are parts of the defendant's 
Gazetteer which are not borrowed from the plaintiffs' work, I cannot grant an injunction on those terms, and it 
becomes a question whether an injunction should be granted in general terms against such parts as have been 
pirated, or whether means should be taken to ascertain what particular parts have been pirated, in order that the 
publication of those particular parts may be especially restrained. Now it appears to me, not that it must be 
admitted by absolute proof and demonstration, for the two works have not been compared in every part, but upon 
the proof and demonstration of what has been examined, and as to the rest by strong inference and presumption, 
arising from the proof given as to those parts to which it applies, and from the nature of the work itself, and the 
circumstances under which it is proved to be composed, that if the parts pirated were taken away, though some 
articles would remain in them entire, yet the greater number would remain in so imperfect and incomplete a state 
that the defendant's work would lose its distinctive and useful character as a Gazetteer. If the defendant were 
desirous to avail himself, as he has an undoubted right to do, of any original matter of his own, or any matter 
which he has fairly taken from other sources, he would, I think, be under the necessity of re-composing his work 
for the purpose of separating that which appears to me to have been improperly taken from the plaintiffs' work. 
Lord Eldon says, with reference to former cases, his language has been, that there must be an injunction against 
such part as has been pirated ; but in that case the part of the work which was affected with the character of 
piracy, was so very considerable, that if it were taken away there would have been nothing left to publish except 
a few broken sentences ; and it was because the evidence before him did not enable him to ascertain the result, 
that he made the special order to which I have referred. But in this case, having availed myself of the evidence 
rvhich has been so industriously collected during the long time this motion was pending, and having read with great care 
all the affidavits laid before me, and more particularly the affidavits of Mr. Holliday and Mr. Cunningham, I think I 
have reason on which I ought judicially to act ; for, considering that the parts of the work which have been 
examined and compared afford a fair indication of the nature and character of those parts of the work which have 
not yet been examined and compared ; and it appearing to me, under these circumstances, that if the parts 
affected with the character of piracy were taken away, there would be left, I do not say nothing but a few broken 
sentences, but an imperfect work, which could not to any useful extent serve the purposes of a Gazetteer, I think 
I ought to grant an injunction to restrain the publication of the parts which are pirated, without waiting till all 
the parts pirated can be ascertained ; and therefore THE ORDER WHICH i SHALL MAKE WILL BE, THAT THE DE- 
FENDANT, HIS AGENTS, SERVANTS, AND WORKMEN, BE RESTRAINED FROM FURTHER PRINTING, PUBLISHING, 
SELLING, OR DISPOSING OF ANY COPY OR COPIES OF A BOOK CALLED "THE NEW AND COMPREHENSIVE GAZET- 
TEER, AND SO ON," CONTAINING ANY ARTICLE OR ARTICLES, PASSAGE OR PASSAGES, COPIED, TAKEN, OR COLOUR- 
ABLY ALTERED, FROM A BOOK CALLED " LEWIS'S TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF ENGLAND," PUBLISHED BY 
THE PLAINTIFFS. 



SUBSCRIBERS 



HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY THE QUEEN 



HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN DOWAGER 



HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HANOVER 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN OF HANOVER 

HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF ALL THE RUSSIAS 

HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF AUSTRIA 



HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF THE BELGIANS 
HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SWEDEN AND NORWAY 
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE LATE DUKE OF SUSSEX 
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE 



HER ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUCHESS OF KENT 



Abbot, John George, Esq., Cranmer Dykes' House, Gateshead 

Abbott, Rev. Christopher, M.A., Kelloe, Durham 

Aberdein, Robert Henry, Esq., Honiton 

ABOYNE, The Right Honourable the Earl of 

ACHESON, The Right Honourable Lord Viscount 

Ackroyd, Robert S., Esq., Field House, Horton, Bradford 

Ackroyd, William, Esq., Birkenshaw, Leeds 

Ackroyd, William, Esq., Westborn Lodge, Otley 

Ackroyd, William, Esq., Horsforth, Leeds 

Acland, Sir P. P. F. P., Bart., Fairfield, Bridg-water, Somerset 

Acworth, Rev. Jas., M.A., President of Horton College, Bradford 

Adair, Alexander, Esq., Heatherton Park, Wellington, Somerset 

Adams, H. C., Esq., Magdalene College, Oxford 

Adams, Rev. Richard, Edingthorpe Rectory, near North Walsham 

Adamsou, Rev. Edward Hussey, M.A., Windy-Nook, Gateshead 

Adamson, John, Esq., Rye, Sussex 

Addison, George Wilson, Esq., Hall Field, Bowling, Bradford 

Addison, Rev. J. Aspinall, B.A., Vicar of Mitton, Yorkshire 

Addison, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Vicar of Rillington-cum-Scampston, 

Adolphus, J., Esq., Harcourt Buildings, Temple, London [Malton 

Agar, John, Esq., Brockfield Park, York 

Ainger, Rev. T., Hampstead, Middlesex 

Airey, Henry Cookson, Esq., Kingthorpe House, Pickering 

Aked, Thomas, Esq., Shipley Grange, Bradford 

Akenhead, Rev. David, B.A., Bishop- W'earmouth 

Akroyd and Son, Messrs. James, Halifax 

Alcock, William N., Esq., Gisburne Park, Skipton 

Alexander, Vice-Admiral, K.C.B., Fareham, Hants 

Aldam, William, Esq., M.P., Warmsworth, Doncaster 

Alderson, Rev. Christ., M.A., Rector of Kirkheaton, Huddersfield 

Alderson, Rev. Jonathan, M.A., Rector of Harthill, Yorkshire 

Alderson, Rev. W., M.A., Rector of Aston, Sheffield 

Aldred, John, Esq., Wellgate House, Rotherham 

Allatt & Haxby, Messrs., Solicitors, Ossett, Wakefield 

Allbutt, Rev. Thomas, M.A. Vicar of Dewsbury, Craven 

Allcroft, Rev. W. R., Whitgift, Goole 

Allen, Rev. George, Incumbent of Great & Little Driffield 

Allen, Rev. S., Rector of Wolterton-cum- Wichmere, near Aylsham 

Allen, William, Esq., The Lodge, Malton, Yorkshire [umberland 

Allgood, Rev. James, M.A., Vicar of Felton & Framlington, North- 

Allhusen, Christian, Esq., Elswick House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Allin, W., Esq., Arundel, Sussex 

VOL, I. 



Ambler, Henry, Esq., Moorside, Ovenden, Halifax 

Ames, John, Esq., Green-street, London, and Pinney House, Devon 

Amies, John, Esq., Frettenham, near Coltishall 

Amoore, William, Esq., Hastings, Sussex 

Anderson, David, Esq., River Head, Driffield 

Anderson, George, Esq., Wingrove House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Anderson, George, Esq., Banker, Kirkaldy 

Anderson, Henry, Esq., Westoe, South Shields 

Anderson, James, Esq., Rose Hill, Wallsend 

Anderson, Joseph, Esq., Benwell Tower, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Anderson, Rev. J. S. M., Brighton 

Anderson, Matthew, Esq., Jesmond Cottage, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Anderson, Robert, Esq., J.P., Westoe, South Shields 

Anderton, George, Esq., Cleckheaton, Leeds 

Anderton, James, Esq., Mount Villa, York 
Andrew, Rev. John, B.A., Incumbent of Worsborough, Barnsley 
Andrew, Rev. W. W., Vicar of Ketteringham, near Norwich 
Andrews, Edward, Esq., Titchfield, Hants 
Andrews, William, Esq., Architect, Bradford 
Angerstein, John, Esq., Weeting Hall, Norfolk 
Ansley, Gilbert, Esq., Houghton Hill, Huntingdon 
Anstis, Bernard, Esq., Liskeard, Cornwall 

Anthony, P. L., jun., Esq., Alphington Cottage, Ottery-St. Mary 
Archbold, James, Esq., J.P., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Archer, John, Esq., Castle Eaton, Fairford, Gloucestershire 
Arkless, Benj., Esq., Tantobie, Gateshead 
Arkwright, Charles, Esq., Dunstall, Burton on Trent 
Arkwright, Rev. Joseph, Mark Hall, Harlow, Essex 
Armitage, Richard, Esq., Johnson's Buildings, Huddersfield 
Armstrong, Rev. Chas.Edw., B.D., Master of Hemsworth Hospital, 
Armstrong, Rev. John, M.A., Wallsend [Pontefract 

Armstrong, William, jun., Esq., Wingate Grange, Castle-Eden, 
Armstrong, William, Esq., Minories, Jesmond [Durham 

Armstrong, W. Esq., Treasurer to the Corporation of Newcastle 
Armytage, Sir George, Bart., Kirklees Park, Dewsbury 
Armytage, Lieut.-Col. H., Hyde Park-street, London 
Arundell, The Honourable Arthur, Springfield, near Horsham 
Arundell, W. A., Esq., Lifton Park, Devon 
Ashbarry, Josh., Esq., Holme Lacy Cottage, Hereford 
Ashburnham, Rev. D., Rector of Catsfield, near Battle 
Ashburnham, Rev. J., B.D., Guestling, near Hastings 
Ashburnham, Sir William, Bart., Broomham, Hastings 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Ashwortb, Messrs. D. & G., Callis Mill, near Halifax 
Askew, Lieut.-Gen. Sir Henry, Pallinsburn, Colclstream, N. Britain 
Askew, Rich. Croston, Esq., Tynemouth, Northumberland 
Astley, Francis L'Estrange, Esq., Burgh Hall, EastDereham, Norfolk 
Astley, Sir John Dugdale, Bart., Everleigh House, Wilts 
Astley, T. J., Esq., Melton Constable, Dereham, Norfolk 
Astley, W. B., Esq., Wellington Lodge, Ryde, Isle of Wight 
Aston, John, Esq., Hereford 
Atherley, A., Esq., Arundel, Sussex 
Atkins, Rev. Henry, Vicar of Arreton, Isle of Wight 
Atkins, Henry, Esq., Maddington, Devizes 
Atkinson, Adam, Esq., Lorbottle House, Alnwick 
Atkinson, Anthony, Esq., Deputy Registrar, Beverley, Yorkshire 
Atkinson, Christopher, Esq., Ewart, Wooler [Tyne 

Atkinson, Geo. Clayton, Esq., Tyne Iron Office, Newcastle-upon- 
Atkinson, Rev. John Breeks, M.A., West Cowes 
Atkinson, John, Esq., Austhorpe Lodge, Leeds 
Atkinson, Josh. Robt., Esq., Elmwood House, Leeds [upon-Tyne 
Atkinson, Robt. Thos., Esq., Seaton-Delaval Colliery, Newcastle- 
Atkinson, Rev. Thos., B.A., Incumbent of Liversedge, Leeds 
Atkinson, Rev. William, B.A., Rector of Gateshend-Fell 
Atkinson, Wm. Simpson, Esq., Barrowby Hall, Leeds 
Atmore, R., Esq., East Harling 
Aubrey, H. P. T., Esq., Broom Hall, Oswestry 
Austen, Vice-Admiral Sir Francis, K.C.B., Portsdown Lodge 
Austin, Joseph, Esq., Headingley, Leeds 
Ayre, Thomas, Esq., Surgeon, Barnsley 
Ay ton, John Featherstone, Esq., Fawcett Street, Sunderland 
Ayton, Henry Isaac, Esq., Seaton-Burn, Colliery, Newcastle-upon- 
Ayton, Robinson, Esq., Swathling Cottage, Southampton [Tyne 
Ayton, William, Esq., Sandhill, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Ayton, Rev. Wm. Alex., B.A., Brompton, Scarborough 
Babb, George, Esq., Town Clerk of Great Grimsby 
Backhouse, John Church, Esq., Beechwood, Darlington 
Bacon, Sir Edmund, Bart. Raveningham Hall, near Beccles 
Bacon, George, Esq., Nottingham 

Bacon, Rev. Robert, LL.D., Incumbent of Fring, near Rougham 
Badcock, Robert, Esq., Wilton, Taunton 
Badger, Benjamin, Esq., Masbrough Cottage, Rotherham 
Badger, Thomas, Esq., Rotherham 
Bagge, Edwaid, Esq., Islington, Lynn, Norfolk 
Bagge, Richard, Esq., do. do. 

Bapge, William, Esq., M.P., StradsettHall, near Downham Market 
BAGOT, The Right Honourable Lord 
Bailey, Charles, Esq., Kirk-Leatham, Guisborough 
Baillie, Rev. J. Farmer, M.A., Great Rissington, Gloucestershire 
Bainbridge, Rev. Francis, B.A., Grammar-school, Rothbury 
Bainbridge, John, Esq., Moor Park, Harrogate 
Bainton, John, Esq., Foston Mills, Driffield 
Bainton, J. B., Esq., Beverley 

Bairstow, Messrs. John & James, Hebden- Bridge, Yorkshire 
Bairstow, Matthew, Esq., Knott, Keighley 
Bairstow, Samuel, Esq., Green Hill, Cross Hills, Skipton 
Bairstow, Thomas, Esq., Royd Hill, Sutton, Keighley 
Bairstow, Messrs. William & John, Keighley 
Baker, Rev. Francis, Wylye, Wilts 
Baker, George, Esq., Dringhouses, York 

Baker, John, jun., Esq., Cowslip Lodge, Wrington, near Bristol 
Baker, Richard, Esq., Midhurst, Sussex 
Baldock, Rev. R., M.A., Langtoft, Driffield 

Baldock, William, Esq., Freshfield Cottage, Millbrook, Southampton 
Baldrey, Robert, Esq., The Square, Halifax 
Baldwin, Henry, Esq., The Square, do. 
Baldwin, John, Esq., Carlton Place, do. 
Banks, George, Esq., St. Catherine's, Doncaster 
Banks, John, Esq., Holt, Norfolk 
Banning, Rev.B., Vicarage, Wellington, Salop 
Barber, Gilbert, Esq., Winchester 

Barber, Rev. John, M.A., Incumbent of Bierley, Bradford 
Barber, Joseph, Esq., Solicitor, Brighouse, Halifax 
Baring, Rev. Frederick, B.C.L., Itchen Stoke, Alresford 
Baring, Sir Thomas, Bart., Stratton Park, Hants 
Barker, James Lamb, Esq., Solicitor, North Shields, Northumber- 
Barker, Thomas, Esq., Vine Grove, Halifax [land 

Barker, Rev. William, M.A., Vicarage, Broad Clyst, near Exeter 
Barkus, William, Jun., Esq., Belle Vue, Gateshead 
Barkwortli, W. H., Esq., Cams Cottage, Hambledon, Hants 
Barlow, G. F., Esq., Bryarcstone-square, London 
Barlow, Rev. Peter, B.A., Cockfield, Darlington 
Barlow, William, Esq., Holybourne, Alton, Hants 
Barnes, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Vicar of Berwick-upon-Tweed 
Barnes, Orlando, Esq., Beeston, Norwich 
Barnes, Richard, Esq., Solicitor, Barnard-Castle 



Barnes, Thomas, Esq., Whitburn, Sunderland 

Barnes, Thomas Addison, Esq., Westoe, South Shields 

Baron, George, Esq., Drewton, South Cave, Yorkshire 

Barrett, Charles, Esq., Sedgefield, Rusheyford, Durham 

Barston, Charles, Esq., Solicitor, Halifax 

Bartlelot, George, Esq., Stopham House, near Petworth, Sussex 

Bartleman, Alexander, Esq., Tynemouth 

Bartlett, Rev. John, Marnwood, near Coalbrook Dale, Salop 

Barton, Rev. John Luke, M.A., Hermitage, Hambledon, Hants 

Baiton, Nathaniel, Esq., Corsley House, near Frome 

Barwell, N., Esq., Ashfold, near Crawley, Sussex 

Barwick, Richard, Esq., Low Hall, Yeadon, Leeds 

Bass, Isaac, Esq., Brighton 

Basset, John, Esq., M.P., Tehidy, Cornwall 

Basset, Lady, Tehidy, Cornwall 

Bassett, Rev. H., Glentworth Vicarage, nearSpittal, Lincolnshire 

Bates, Ely, Esq., West Hill, Halifax 

Bates, J. M., Esq., M.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Bates, Jno. Moore, Esq., Mount Pleasant, Heddon-on-the-Wall 

Bath, H. Pyle, Esq., Colestocks, Feniton, Devon 

Bathurst, Sir F. H., Bart., Clarendon Park, Wilts 

Bathurst, Rev. W. H., M.A., Rector of Barwick-in-Elmet, Leeds 

Batten, John, Esq., Penzance, Cornwall 

Batten, John, Esq., Yeovil, Somerset 

Battersby, Rev. W., M.A., Parsonage, Heckmondwike 

Battley, Rev. Charles B., M.A., Whitkirk, Leeds 

Battye & Firth, Messrs., Solicitors, Birstall 

Battye, Wm. Walker, Esq., Thorp Villa, Almondbury, Huddersfield 

Bayfield, Rev. B., M.A., Incumbent of Ripponden, Halifax 

Bayldon, Rev. J., M.A., Thwing, Bridlington 

Bayley, Thomas, Esq., The Black Birches, near Shrewsbury 

Bayley, William, Esq., Hastings, Sussex 

Baynes, Mrs. General, Woolbrook, Sidmouth, Devon 

Bayton, Rev. W. Stevens, Rector of Ford, near Arundel 

Beach, William, Esq., Oakley Hall, Basingstoke 

Beadon, Edwards, Esq., Highlands, Taunton 

Beadon, Rev. F., M.A., Rector of North Stoneham, Hants 

Beard, Steyning, Esq., Ovingdean, near Brighton 

Beatson, William, Esq., Masbrough, Rotherham 

Beauchamp, Rev. Thomas, Rector of Buckenham Ferry, Norfolk 

Beaumont, Joseph, Esq., Mold Green, Huddersfield 

Beaumont, Thomas, Esq., Laura Place, Bradford 

Beaumont, Thomas Mills, Esq., Knaresborough 

Beaver, Rev. H. N., M.A., Vicar of Gringley-on-the-Hill, Bawtry 

Beck, Peter, Esq., Halifax 

Beckett, Christopher, Esq., J.P., Meanwood Hall, Leeds 

Beckett, John Staniforth, Esq., Barnsley 

Beckett, William, Esq., M.P., Kirkstall Grange, Leeds 

Beckett, Rev. Wilson, B.A., Vicar of Heighington, Darlington 

Beckingsale, William Jeffries, Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight 

Beckwith, Rev. Henry, Eaton Constantine, Shrewsbury 

Beckwith, Rev.T. F., B.D., Vicarage, East Retford, Notts 

Beckwith, William, Eeq., Thearne Cottage, Beverley 

Beddome, John Reynolds, Esq., M.D., Romsey, Hants 

Bedinfeld, J. L., Esq., Ditchingham Hall, Bungay 

Bedlington, George, Esq., Ovinjjham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Beebee, Rev. Meyrick, M.A.,Simonburn Rectory, Hexham 

Beeby, Thomas, Esq., Clifton, Biggleswade 

Beechey, W. Nelson, Esq., Barge-yard, London 

Beed, Rev. J. B., Vicar of Felpham, near Bognor 

Belk, Thomas, Esq., Town Clerk of Hartlepool 

Bell, Lieut.-Col. C. Hamilton, Auchtertool House, Fifeshire 

Bell, Eirington, Esq., Ogle Terrace, South Shields 

Bell, G. M., Esq., Claremont Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Bell, Rev. H. Edward, B.A., Vicar of Long-Houghton, Alnwick 

Bell, John Thomas Witham, Esq., C.E., Castle-Eden, Durham 

Bell, Richard H., Esq., J. P. Lawe, South Shields 

Bell, Thomas, Esq., Picton Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Bell, William, Esq., Ford House, Sunderland 

Bellhouse, Rev. W. Cocker, B.A., Grammar School, Tadcaster 

Bellingham, John, Esq., Rye, Sussex 

Bellman, Rev. Edmund, Hainford, near Norwich 

Bellwood, Rev. William, Incumbent of Sinnington, Pickering 

Benbow, John Henry, Esq., Stone Buildings, Lincoln's Inn, London 

Bennett, Joseph, Esq., Surgeon, Wakefield 

Bennett, Joseph B. H., Esq., Tutbury, Burton on Trent 

Bennett, William, Esq., M.D., Harrogate, Yorkshire 

Bennett, Rev. W. C., Vicar of Corsham, Wilts 

Benning, Henry, Esq., Barnard-Castle, Durham 

Benson, Rev. H. B., M.A., Utterby House, Louth [Yorkshire 

Benson, Rev. Isaac, Incumbent of Acklam and Middlesbrough, 

Benson, Rev. John, Norton-sub- Hambden, near Yeovil 

Bentinck, the Hon. & Rev. W. H. E., Rector of Sigglesthorne, Hull 



SUBSCRIBERS, 



Bentley, Greenwood, Esq., Bradford 

Bentley, Henry, Esq., Oulton, Leeds 

Beresford, Colonel, Repion Hayes, Burton on Trent 

Bernard, Rev. William, Rector of Clatworthy, near Wivelisoombe 

BERNERS, The Right Honourable and Rev. Lord 

Berry, Grove, Esq., Surgeon, Ilarrogate 

Bertram, Charles, Esq., J. P. Gateshead, Durham 

Berwick, Alexander, Esq., J. P. Norton, Ratho, Edinburgh 

Best, Rev. Francis, M.A., Rector of South Dalton, Beverley 

Bethell, Richard, Esq., J. P., Rise, Kingston-upon-Hull 

Bethune, R,ev. G. M., LL.D., Worth Rectory, near Crawley, Sussex 

Belts, Rev/ James, Ellingham Rectory, near Bungay 

Bevan, Rev. Frederick, Carleton Rode, near Attleburgh 

Bevan, John W., Esq., Redruth, Cornwall 

Bevan, William, Esq., Old Jewry, London 

Beverley, William, Esq., Preston Place, Leeds 

Bewicke, Mrs. Margaret, Close House, Northumberland 

Bewsher, Rev. F. W., M.A., Killingworth, Newcastle-on-Tyne 

Bewsher, Rev. James, Lapley, near W r olverhampton 

Bickford, Mr. J. T., Camborne, Cornwall 

Biddulph, A. G. Wright, Esq., Burton Park, near Petworth 

Bidwill, Joseph G., Esq., Felix Hill House, Exeter 

Biedermann, Rev. G. A., Rector of Dantsey, Wilts 

Bigge, Charles William, Esq., J. P., Linden, Morpeth 

Bigge, Rev. John F., M.A., Incumbent of Ovingham, Newcastle- 

Bigland, John, Esq., Bramham, Tadcaster [upon-Tyne 

Bignold & Mawe, Messrs., Norwich 

Bilham, Robert, Esq., Stow Bedon Hall, near Watton 

Billington, William, Esq., Civil Engineer, Wakefield, Yorkshire 

Bilton, Edward, Esq., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Bingham, Mrs., Harptree Court, Old Down, Somerset 

Birch, Rev. Charles, Rector of Sawtrey-All Saints, near Stilton 

Birch, Wyrley, Esq., Wretham Hall, near Thetford 

Birkbeck, John, jun., Esq., Settle, Yorkshire 

Birkbeck, Thomas, Esq., Stackhouse, Settle 

Birkett, Rev. Robert, M.A., Vicar of Kelloe, Durham 

Birt, John, Esq., Mounton, near Chepstow 

Bishop, Rev. Alfred, M.A., Tichborne, Alresford, Hants 

Bishop, Henry, Esq., Hastings, Sussex 

Bisshopp, Sir Cecil A., Bart., Merton Coll., Oxford 

Bissland, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Rector of Hartley-Maudytt, Alton 

Black, William, jun., Esq., Caister St. Edmund's, near Norwich 

Blackburn, Henry Webster, Esq., Prospect House, Bradford 

Blackburn, John, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Blackett, Sir Edward, Bart., Matfen, Newcastle-upon-Tyne [Tyne 

Blackett, Rev. John Alexander, M.A., Heddon, Newcastle-upon- 

Blackwell, Rev. Christopher, M. A., Vicarage, Seamer, Scarborough 

Blagrave, Anthony, Esq., Harptree Court, Old Down, Somerset 

Blake, Rev. E., Brameiton, Norwich 

Blake, Silas Wood, Esq., Venne House, Upton, near Wiveliscombe 

Blake, William, Esq., Catsey, Trull, near Taunton 

Blake, William, Esq., Manor House, Rilston, Skipton 

Blakemore, Thomas, Esq., Newport, Sak>p 

Blaker, John, jun., Esq., Southover, Lewes 

Bland, John, Esq., South Villa, Rotherham, Yorkshire 

Blane, Rev. Henry, M.A., Bishop- Wearmouth, Durham 

Blanshard, W., Esq., M.A., Barrister-at-Law, St. Leonard's Place, 

Blayds, John, Esq., Oulton House, Sheffield [York 

Blencowe, Rev. James, Sidmouth, Devon 

Blencowe, R. W., Esq., The Hooke, near Chailey, Lewea 

Blennerhassett, Rev. John, Rectory, Ryme, Sherborne 

Blofeld, Rev. T. Calthorpe, Hoveton House, Norwich 

Blommant, Lieut.-Gen., Willett House, near Taunton 

Bloome, Matt., Esq., Solicitor, Leeds, Yorkshire 

Blount, Sir Edward, Bart., Mawley, Bewdley 

Bloxam, Robert, Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight" 

Blunt, Edward Walter, Esq., Kempshott Park, Basingstoke 

Blunt, Gen. R., K.C.B., Shirley, Southampton 

Blyth, Rev. C. Deltick, Rector of Sutton, Bedfordshire 

Blyth, Rev. Geo. Blanshard, M.A., Vicar of North Newbald, Mar- 

Blyth, H. E., Esq., Sussex Farm, Burnham [ket-Weighton 

Boghurst, P., Esq., Worthing, Sussex 

Bolitho, Thomas, Esq., Chyandour, Penzance 

Bond, Rev. John, M.A., Rector of Romansleigh, Devon . 

Bond, Rev. Robert, The Lawn, Briston, near Holt 

Bonnett, Rev. C. S., Avington, Winchester 

Boor, J., Esq., Warminster, Wilts 

Booth, James, Esq., Ing House, Liversedge, Leeds 

Booth, John, Esq., Crouch Hall, Hornsey 

Booth, Joseph Wilkinson, Esq., Solicitor, Wakefield 

Booth, Richard, Esq., Basing House, Basingstoke 

Booth, Rev. Robert, Rodmell Rectory, near Lewes 

Booth, Samuel Lister, Esq., Solicitor, Bramley and Leeds 



Booth, Thomas, Esq., Park Iron-Works, near Sheffield 

Boothby, Rev. Henry, B.A., Kirby-Misperton, Malton 

Borough, Burton, Esq., Chetwynd Park, Newport, Salop 

Borrer, W., Esq., Barrow Hill, Henfield, near Steyning 

Borthwiok, John, Esq., West Newton, Wooler 

Bosanquet, Charles, Esq., J.P., Rock, Alnwiok 

Bosville, A.W., Esq., J.P.,Thorpe Hall, Bridlington 

Botfield, Thomas, Esq., Hopton Court, Cleobury Mortimer 

Bottomley, Moses, Esq., Wade House, Shelf, Halifax 

Boucher, Rev. James, M.A., Lesbury, Alnwick 

Boughey, Sir Thomas, Bart., Aqualate, Staffordshire 

Boult, William, Esq., Moulton Hall, near Acle ' [Honiton 

Bouike, Thos.,Esq,, Worcester Coll., Oxford, and Sidbury Vicarage, 

Bourne, The Right Honourable J. Sturges, M.P. 

Bourne, R. H., Esq., Solicitor, Staindrop, Durham 

Boustead, Rev. James, M.A., Stockton-on-Tees 

Boutland, Wm., Esq., Bill Quay, Gateshead, Durham 

Bouverie, Rev. W. Arundell, Rectory, Denton, Harleston 

Bowen, Rev. Charles, B.A., Lecturer of Armley, Leeds 

Bower, Abraham, Esq., Middlethorpe Hall, York 

Bower, John, Esq., Belle Vue Place, Bradford 

Bower, Rev. J. W., B.A., Rector of Barmston, Bridlington 

Bower, Robert, Esq., Welham, Malton 

Bower, T. B., Esq., Iwerne House, Blandford, Dorset 

Bowerman, Richard, Esq., Uffculme, near Wellington, Somerset 

Bowles, Rev. C. B., Woking, Surrey 

Bowles, H., Esq,, Worthing, Sussex 

Bowly, Devereux, Esq., Chesterton House, Cirencester 

Bowman, James, Esq., Union Bank, Huddersfield [ford 

Bowman, Rev. John, M. A.., Incumbent of St. Paul's, Wibsey, Brad- 

Bowne, Robert, Esq., Castle House, Winchester 

Bowness, Rev. George, M.A. t Rector of Rokeby, Barnard-Castle 

Bowyer, J., Esq., Petworth, Sussex 

Boyes, James, Esq., Beverley 

Boyle, Rev. J., S. C. L., Incumbent of Brighouse, Halifax 

Boylcs, Rev. C. Gower, M.A., Rector of Buriton 

Boys, William, Esq., Bridgwater 

Brace, Vice-Adm. Sir Edward, K.C.B., Catisfield Lodge, Fareham 

Bracewell, Christopher, Esq., Earby, Skipton 

Brackenbury, Bennet, Esq., Solicitor, Gainsborough 

Braddon, William, Esq., Skisdon Lodge, Wadebridge, Cornwall 

Bradford, Rev. John, Newton Abbott, Devon 

Bradford, Rev. W., Rector of Storrington, Sussex 

Bradley, Thomas, Esq., Alnwiek, Northumberland 

Brady, Henry, Esq., Gateshead 

Brameld, Rev. G. W., Louth, Lincolnshire 

Bramley, Lawrence, Esq., Halifax 

Bramley, Richard, Esq., Campfield House, Leeds 

Bramwell, Thomas, Esq., Field House, Gateshead 

Brandling, C, J., Esq., Dep.-Lieut., Middleton Lodpe, Leeds 

Brandling, Rev. R. H., M.A-, & J.P., Seaton-Burn Hall, Newcastle 

Brandling, Robt. W., Esq., J.P., Low-Gosforth, Northumberland 

Brandreth, Rev. W. Harper, M.A., Standish, Lancashire 

Bray, Rev. William, M.A., Vicar of Hartley- Wintney, Hants 

Brayshaw, Rev. Timothy, M.A., Grammar School, Keighley 

Brazier, Henry, Esq., Rye, Sussex 

Breckon, Robert, Esq., Solicitor, Whitby 

Breeds, Messrs. Thomas & C,o,, Hastings 

Brereton, Rev. C. D., M.A., Rector of Little Massingham 

Brereton, John, Esq., Brinton, East Dereham 

Brereton, Rev. Dr. John, Head Masterof Grammar School, Bedford 

Brereton, Robert John, Esq., Blakeney, Norfolk 

Brereton, Rv. Shovell, Briningham^ Holt, ditto 

Brereton, Rev. Thomas W., Vicar of Framsden, near Debenham 

Breton, John Frederick, Esq., Lyndhurst, Hants 

Breton, Peter, Esq., Southampton 

Breton, Thomas, Esq., Bexhill, near St. Leonard's 

Brett, Charles, Esq., Exbury House, Fawley, Hants 

Brewin, Rev. George, Scrayihgham, York 

Brewster, Rev. John, M.A., Vicar of Greatham, Stockton-upon-Tees 

Brewster, Rev. R. F., M.A., Killingworth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Bridge, Richard, Esq., North Curry, near Taunton 

Bridge, Sealy, Esq., South Petherton, Somerset 

Bridge, S. F., Esq., Wellington, do. 

Bridger, Charles, Esq., Winchester 

Bridger, H. C., Esq., Buckingham House, near Shoreham 

Bridges, Francis S., Esq., Horton Hall, Bradford 

Bridges, Rev. Nathaniel, Henstridge, near Shaftsbury 

Bridgman, Edward, Esq., Qonej-.\Xe$ton Hall, near Thetford 

BRlDPORT, The JRigh^Honourable Lord 

Brigg, William, Esq., Cross Hills, Skipton, Yorkshire 

Briggs, Rev. Fran. B., Vicar of St. Stephen's by Saltash, Cornwall 

Briggs, Nathaniel, Esq., Ashfield Place, Bradford 

a2 



Xll 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Briggs, Rawdon, Esq., South Parade, Wakefield 

Briggs, Rawdon, Esq., J.P., Birstwith Hall, Ripley 

Brigham, William, Esq., Lair Gate, Beverley, Yorkshire 

Briscoe, Musgrave, Esq., Coghurst, near Hastings 

Bristow, Robert, Esq., Broxmore Park, Wilts 

Bristowe, Samuel Ellis, Esq., Basthorpe Hall, near Newark 

Broadbent, James, Esq., Acre House, Lindley, Huddersfield 

Broadbent, Samuel, Esq., Bradford, Yorkshire 

Broadwood, Rev. John, Bedford House, Worthing 

Brock, Thomas Clutton, Esq., Pensax Court, Worcester 

Brockett, William Edward, Esq., Bensham Lodge, Gateshead 

Brockett, Wm. Henry, Esq., J.P., King James Street, do. 

Brockman, Rev. Tatton, Vicar of Rottingdean, near Brighton 

Brodie, B. B., Esq., 49, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London 

Bromehead, Rev. A. C., M.A., Rectory House, Eckington, Ches- 

Bromet, John, Esq., The Grange, Tadcaster, Yorkshire [ terfield 

Brook, Charles, Esq., Healey House, Huddersfield 

Brook, Mrs'. Jonas, West House, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Brook, Joseph, Esq., J.P.,Greenhead, Huddersfield 

Brook & Freeman, Messrs., Solicitors, do. 

Brook, Thomas, Esq., Badsworth, Pontefract 

Brook, William Leigh, Esq., Meltham Hall, Huddersfield 

Brooke, John, Esq., Armitage Bridge, do. 

Brooke, John, Esq., Berry Hall, Old Walsingham 

Brooks, Wm. Alex., Esq., C.E., Guildhall, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Brothers, Rev. James, Wissett, near Halesworth 

Broughton, William, Esq., Solicitor, Bawtry 

Brown, Alexander, Esq., Beilby Grange, Wetherby 

Brown, Rev. Dr., Downside College, Midsomer Norton, Old Down 

Brown, Rev. Edward, M.A., Leeds, Yorkshire 

Brown, Francis, Esq., Welbourn, Grantham 

Brown, Isaac, Esq., Cowpen Lodge, Blyth, Northumberland 

Brown, James, Esq., J.P., Hare Hills Grove, Leeds 

Brown, Rev. James Humphrey, M.A., Vicar of Dalton-le-Dale, 

Brown, Rev. Js. L., B.A., Incumbent of Holbeck, Leeds [Durham 

Brown, John, Esq., Clerk to the Justices, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Brown, John, Esq., Seaton-Delaval, North Shields 

Brown, J., Esq., M.D., & J. P., Bishop- Wearmouth, Sunderland 

Brown, Robert, Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland 

Brown, Robert, Esq., Solicitor, Barton-upon-Humber 

Brown, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Skipton 

Brown, Rev. Thomas James, M.A., Portsmouth 

Brown, William, Esq., Manor House, Winterborne-Stoke, Devizes 

Brown, Rev. William, B.A., Wark, Hexham 

Brown, W. Williams, Esq., J-.P., Allerton Hall, Chapel-Allerton 

Brown, Rev. Wilse, M.A., Egglestone, Barnard-Castle 

Browne, Rev. C. H., Rector of Bio-Norton, near East Harling 

Browne, Rev. J. Geoffrey, A.B., Rector of Kiddington, Woodstock 

Browne, J. T. G., Esq., Morley House, near Wymondham 

Browne, Thomas, Esq., Thrigby Hall, near Yarmouth 

Browne, Thomas, Esq., Amble House, Alnwick 

Browne, Rev. Thomas Briailey, B.A., Wortley, Leeds 

Browne, Rev. Thomas Cooper, M.A., DarnalfHall, Sheffield 

Browne, W. J. Utten, Esq., The Lodge, Bramerton, near Norwich 

Browne. William W., Esq., Jarrow, South Shields 

BROWNLOW, The Right Honourable the Earl 

Brownrigg, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Incumbent of Boston, Wetherby 

Bruce, Thomas, Esq., Parham Lodge, near W r oodbridge 

Brumell, H. & G., Messrs., Solicitors, Morpeth, Northumberland 

Brunton, Thomas, Esq., Town Clerk, Sunderland 

Rruton, Lieut. -Col., Croford, Wiveliscombe, Somerset 

Buckingham, The Ven. Archd. of, Shanklin Parsonage, Isle of Wight 

Buckland, C.E., Esq., Shaftesbury 

Buckle, John, Esq., Wyelands, Chepstow, Monmouthshire 

Buckle, Joseph, Esq., Lord Mayor of York, 1842-3 

Buckley, John, Esq., Redgefoot, Todmorden 

Bucknell, George, Esq., Crowcombe, near Taunton 

Bucknell, Robert, Esq., Hulse, near Milverton, Somerset 

Buckner, Rev. C.J*Perpet. Curate of Mid-Lavant, near Chichester 

Bull, Joseph, Esq., Coppice Green, near Shiffnall, Salop 

Bulmer, George, Esq., Duncan Street, Leeds, Yorkshire 

Bulwer, Rev. Edward, Sail Rectory, near Reepham 

Bulwer, Rev. James, Aylsham, Norfolk 

Bulwer, W. E. L., Esq., Heydon Hall, Reepham 

Bunkill, Charles, Esq., Wintringham, Brigg, Lincolnshire 

Bunney, William, Esq., Solicitor, Kingston-upon-Hull 

Bunting, Jabez, jun., Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Burder, William, E&q., Brineton Villa, Shiffnall 

Burdis, Edward Forster, Esq., North of England Bank, Sunderland 

Burdon, George, Esq., J.P., Heddon House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Burfield, James, Esq., Hastings 

Burgh, Henry, Esq., Bittern Lodge, Southampton 

Burkitt, John, Esq., Selby, Yorkshire 



Burne, T. H., Esq., Loynton Hall, near Newport, Salop 
Burnett, Charles M., Esq., Alton, Hants 

Burnett, George, jun., Esq., Lead Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Burnett, Thomas Hayton, Esq., Windmill Hill, Gateshead 
Burney, Rev. Henry, Wheatley Rectory, near Frome, Somerset 
Burningham, Thomas, Esq., Froyle, Hants 
Burrell, Bryan, Esq., Bolton, Alnwick 

Burrell, Sir Charles Merrik, Bart., M.P., Knepp Castle, Shipley 
Burrell, Henry Peareth, Esq., Little Hougkton, Alnwick 
Burrell, John, Esq., Iron Founder, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Burrell, John, Esq., Wakefield, Yorkshire 
Burridge, Rev. William, Bradford, Somerset 
Burrington, Rev. Gilbert, Rector of Woodleigh, Devon 
Burroughes, H. N., Esq., M.P., Burlingham Hall, Norwich 
Burroughes, Rev. Jeremiah, Lingwood Lodge, Norwich 
Burrow, Thomas Dixon, Esq., Settle, Yorkshire 
Burt, Rev. Alexander, Manse of Arngask, Kinross 
Burt, Rev. J.T., Perpet. Curate of Seething, Norwich 
Burt, Thomas R., Esq., East Grinsted 
Burton, Alfred, Esq., St. Leonard's on Sea, Sussex 
Burton, Lancelot Archer, Esq., Woodlands, Emsworth, Hants 
Burtsal, N., Esq., Bungay, Suffolk 
Bury, Charles, Esq., Liphook, Hants 
Bury, Robert, Esq., Welches, Bentley, do. 
Busfeild, Rev. Harcourt, M.A., Incumbent of Coley, Halifax 
Busfeild, Johnson Atkinson, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford 
Busfeild, Rev. J. A., D.D., Rector of St. Michael's, Wood Street, 
\ [London, and Cailton Vicarage, Skiptom 
Busfeild, Rev. William, M.A., Rector of Keighley 
Busfeild, William, Esq., M.P., Upwood, Bingley, Yorkshire 
Bush, Elijah, Esq., Tiowbridge, Wilts 
Buston, Roger, Esq., of Buston, Alnwick 
Butcher, Robert, Esq., The Grove, Bungay 
Buthon, Peter, Esq., Millbrook, Southampton 
Butler.Rev.C.R., M.A., Catherington, Hants 
Butler, Thomas, Esq., Kirkstall, Leeds, Yorkshire 
Butler, Rev. William James, B.D., Westbourne, Sussex 
Butterfield, Brothers, Messrs., Keighley 
Butterton, Rev. George Ash, B.D., Uppingham 
Buttery, John, Esq., Nottingham 

Buxton, Sir John Jacob, Bart., Schadwell Park, near Thetford 
Buxton, Sir T. Fowell, Bart., North Repps, near Aylsham 
Byron, James Standish, Esq., J.P., West Ayton, Scarborough 
Caffin, Rev. George B., B.A., Brimpton, Berks 
Caiger, Capt. Herbert, R.N., Otterbourne, Winchester 
Calder, Adam, Esq., Shatter, Kelso, N. Britain 
Caldwell, H. B., Esq., Hilborow Hall, near Brandon 
Caley, VVilliam, Esq., Saltwell House, Gateshead 
Callander, John Alexander, Esq., Springfield House, Ryde 
CALTHORPE, The Right Honourable Lord 
Calthrop, John, Esq., Stanhoe Hall, near Rougham 
Calver, Daniel, Esq., Kenninghall, near East Harling 
Camm, Alfred, Esq., Well Holme, Brighouse, York 
Campbell, Rev. Colin, M.A., Sunderland, Durham 
Campbell, Rev. Charles, Weasenham, near Rougham 
Campion, Edward, Esq., Hexham, Northumberland 
Campion, Francis, Esq., Solicitor, Thome, Yorkshire 
Cane, Rev. T. C., Brackenhurst, Southwell, Notts 
Cann, Rev. J. S., Wramplingham Hall, near Wymondham 
Cann, W. R., Esq., Casick House, Wymondham 
CANTILUPE, The Right Honourable Lord 

Capel, Arthur, Esq., Bulland Lodge, near Wiveliscombe, Somerset 
Capes, Thomas Hawksley, Esq., Reedness, Goole ; and Howden 
Cargill, John, Esq., M.D., Eldon Square, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Cariss, Benjamin, Esq., Osmondthorpe Cottage, Leeds 
Carne, Edward Cliften, Esq., Falmouth, Cornwall 
Carnegie, Rev. J., Seaford, Sussex 
Carpenter, George, Esq., Rye, do. 

Carr, Rev. Charles, M.A., Rector of Burnby, Pocklington 
Carr, Charles, Esq., Seghill, Earsdon, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Carr, Rev. Cuthbert.B.A., Tynemouth, Northumberland 
Carr, C. & W., Messrs., Solicitors, Gomersal, Leeds 
Carr, Rev. Henry B., M.A., Alnwick 

Carr, John, Esq., Hedgeley House, Whittingham, near Alnwick 
Carr, John, Esq., Bondgate Hall, Alnwick 
Carr, John, Esq., Solicitor, Skipton, Yorkshire 
Carr, John Thomas, Esq., Russian Consul, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Carr, Rev. John, Alnham Vicarage, Alnwick 
Carr, John, Esq., Rosewarth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Carr, Ralph, Esq., J.P., Dunston Hill, Gateshead 
Carr, Richard, Esq., Stackhouse, Settle 
Carr, Robert, Esq., Solicitor, Wakefield 
Carr, Rev. W., B.D., Incumbent of Bolton-Abbey, Yorkshire 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Xlll 



Carr, William, Esq., Cross House, Wath-upon-Dearne, Rotherham 

Carr, William Ridley, Esq., Scotswood, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Carrick & Lee, Messrs., Solicitors, Bramptou, Cumberland 

Carrick, Robert, Esq., Croft House, Haltwhistle 

Carron Company, Canon, by Joseph Danson, Esq. 

Carruthers, W. T., Esq., J.P., Arthingtou Hall, Otley 

Carter, Charles T., Esq., Newgate Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Carter, Rev. John, D.D., Head Master of Gram. School, Wakefield 

Carter, John, Esq., Knottingley, Ferrybridge 

Carter, John Thomas, Esq., Hunstanton, near Lynn 

Carter, Rev. R. Foster, B.A., Rector of Rowner, Gosport, Hants 

Carter, Rev. T. T., Piddle Hinton, Dorchester, Dorset 

Carter, Thomas, Esq., Howden 

Carter, Rev. W., B.A., Incumbent of Old and New Malton 

Carter, William, Esq., Howden 

Carter, William Edward, Esq., Solicitor, Pontefract 

CARTERET, The Right Honourable Lord 

Cartwright, Henry, Esq., Hill Hall, near Eccleshall, Staffordshire 

Case, William, Esq., Fareham, Hants 

Cash, Newman, Esq., Scarcroft Lodge, Leeds 

Cass, William Eden, Esq., Goole 

Cassels, Rev. Andrew, M.A., Vicar of Batley, Dewsbury 

Cassidi, Rev. Wm., B.A., Vicar of Grindon, Stockton-upon-Tees 

Casson, Thomas, Esq., Hatfield Hall, Wakefield 

Castell, Rev. William, Vicar of Brooke, near Norwich 

Cater, William, Esq., Wraxham Hall, near Stalham 

Cator, Rev. Charles, M. A., Rectory, Stokesley 

Catt, William, Esq., Bishopstone, nearNewhaven 

Cautley, Rev. W. G., Earsham Rectory, near Bungay 

CAVAN, The Right Honouiable the Earl of 

Cavendish, The Hon. Richard, Belgrave Square, London 

Chadwick, Charles, Esq., M.D., Park Row, Leeds 

Challen, S. H., Esq., Shermanbury Park, Henfield, near Steyning 

Chamberlain, Richard Dineley, Esq., Skipton 

Chamberlaine, Rev. George Thomas, Rector of Almsford, Somerset 

Chamberlayne, J. Chamberlayne, Esq., Mangersbury House 

Chamberlayne, Thomas, Esq., Cranbury Park, Winchester 

Chambers, John, Esq., Belle Mont, Chapeltown, Sheffield 

Chambers, Thomas W., Esq., Chinton, near Seaford, Sussex 

Champney, Thomas Frederick, Esq., Beverley, Yorkshire 

Chance, James T., Spring Grove, Monument Lane, Birmingham 

Chandler, Rev. George, M.A., Treeton, Rotherham, Yorkshire 

Chandler, The Very Rev. G., D.D., Dean of Chichester 

Chapman, John, Esq., Stakesby, Whitby 

Chapman, John Mellar, Esq., Usworth Place, Gateshead 

Chapman, Major-Gen. Sir Stephen, C.B., K.C.B., Fail-field House 

Chapman, Robert Stiles, Esq., Little Langford House, Wily 

Chapman, Rev. W. S., B.A., Romsey, Hants 

Chapman, William Thomas, Esq., Biggleswade 

Charleton, John, Esq., Sunderland 

Charleton, Robert, Esq., Lee Hall, Hexham 

Charleton, Watson, Esq., High Farm, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Charlton, Anthony, Esq., Solicitor, Morpeth 

Charlton, E., Esq., M.D., 3, Eldon Square, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Charlton, Philip, Esq., Wytherford Hall, near Shrewsbury 

Charlton, St. John C., Esq., Aspley Castle, Wellington, Salop 

Charlton, Thomas B., Esq., Chelwell Hall, Nottingham 

Charnock, John, Esq., The Avenue, Woodhouse, Leeds 

Chaston, James, Esq., Brandish Lodge, Framlingham 

Chatfield, Rev. A. W., Vicar of Stotfold, Baldock 

Chaytor, M.H., Esq., Union Bank, Sunderland 

Cheadle, Rev. James, M.A., Vicar of Bingley, Yorkshire 

Cheales, Rev. Henry, M.A., Harbridge, Fordingbridge, Hants 

Cheere, W. H., Esq., Papworth Hall, near Caxton, Cambridgeshire 

Cheney, R. H. Esq., Badger Hall, Shiffnall, Salop 

Chetham, Capt. Sir Edward, K.C.H., C.B., Haslar Hospital 

Chevallier, Rev. John, M.D., Aspall Hall, near Debenham 

CHICHESTER, The Right Honourable the Earl of 

CHICHESTER, The Right Rev. the late Lord Bishop of 

Childe, William Lacon, Esq., Kinlet Hall, Salop 

Childs, Rev. John Glynn, St. Blazey, Cornwall 

Chitty, P. M., Esq., Shaftesbury, Dorset 

Cholmley, Col., Howsham, Whitwell, Yorkshire 

Chrystie, Captain Thomas, R.N., Hope Street, Edinburgh 

Clanny, W'illiam Reid, Esq., M.D., Sunderland 

Clapham, Samuel Blakey, Esq., Aireworth, Keighley 

Clapham, Thomas, Esq., Potter-Newton, Leeds 

Clapp, Rev. Charles John, Rector of Coulston, near Devizes, Wilts 

Claridge, Henry, Esq., The Mount, York 

Clark, Rev. George, M. A., Alton, Hants 

Clark, George, Esq., Barnby Moor, East Retford 

Clark, Mr. George, Horsham, Sussex 

Clark, John, Esq., Architect, Leeds 



Clark, Rev. John, Incumbent of Hunslet in Leeds, and Domestic 

[Chaplain to Lord Howden 

Clark, Rev. John Dixon, M.A., & J.P.,BelfordHall, Northumber- 
Clark, John Graves, Esq., Masboro' Hall, Rotherham [land 

Clarke, Abraham, Esq., Holt, near Minehead 
Clarke, Rev. Henry, M. A., Incumbent of Guisborough 
Claike, Joseph, Esq., Manor House, Kippax, Pontefract 
Clarke, Robert C., Esq., Noblethorpe, Barnsley 
Clarke, Thomas, Esq., Chard, Somerset 
Clarke, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Vicar of Mitcheldever, Hants 
Clarkson, Henry, Esq., Wakefield, Yorkshire 
Clarkson, Rev. Thomas Bayley, M.A., Badsworth, Pontefract 
Clavering, John, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Clay, John, Esq., Laygate House, South Shields 
Clay, Joseph Travis, Esq., Rastrick, Huddersfield 
Clay, Patrick, Esq., Mayor of Berwick-upon-Tweed, 1843 
Claydon, C. T., Esq., Bawburgh, near Norwich 
Clayton, Rev. J. Henry, M.A., Rector of Farnborough, Hants 
Clayton, Thos. Greenwood, Esq., J.P., Bierley Hall, Bradford 
Clayton, Wm., Esq., J.P., Langcliffe Place, Settle, Yorkshire 
Cleather, Rev. G. P., Chirton, Devizes, Wilts 
Clements, W. B., Esq., Wadebridge, Cornwall 
Clennell, Thos., Esq., J.P., Harbottle Castle, Rothbury 
CLEVELAND, His Grace the Duke of 
CLIFFORD, The Right Honourable Lord 
Clifton, Robert, Esq., Brandon, Suffolk 
Close, Thomas, Esq., Nottingham 
Clough, John, Esq., Bootham, Yorkshire 
Clough, The Misses, Feltwell, near Brandon 
Clubbe, C. Esq., Framlingham 

Clutterbuck, Rev. Henry, M.A., Vicar of Kempstone, Bedford 
Clutterbuck, John, Esq., J.P., Warkworth, Alnwick 
Clutton, Messrs. Robert & John, Whitehall Place 
Coates, James, Esq., Solicitor, Wetherby 

Coates, Peter Eaton, Esq., Stanton Court, Stanton-Drew, Somerset 
Cockell, Charles, Esq., Attleburgh 

Cockerton, Rev. David, B.A., East Bullington House, Hants 
Cockerton, Rev. John, M.A., Dronfield, Sheffield 
Cogan, Rev. T. W., Rector of All Saints, Chichester 
Colbeck, Harrison, Esq., Leamington House, Newcastle 
Colbeck, James, Esq., Whorlton Hall, do. 

Colby, Rev. Samuel, Rector of Little Ellingham, near Attleborough 
Coldham, H. W., Esq., Anmer Park, near Lynn 
Coldham, Rev. J., Vicar of Snettisham, do. 
Cole, Robert, Esq., Holybourn Lodge, Alton, Hants 
Cole, William, Esq., Newhaven, Sussex 
Coleman, Henry John, Esq., Town Clerk of Pontefract 
Coleridge, Francis George, Esq., Ottery-St. Mary, Devon 
Coleridge, Rev. James Duke, LL.D. Vicar of Thovorton, do. 
Colfox, Wm., Esq., Rax House, Bradpole, near Bridport [Tyne 
Collingwood, Edw., Esq., J.P., DissingtonHall, Newcastle-upon- 
Collingwood, Edw. John, Esq.,High Sheriff, 1844, Lilburn Tower 
Collingwood, Fred. John Woodley, Esq., Glanton Pyke, Alnwick 
Collins, Rev. Caleb, Rector of Stedham, near Midhurst 
Collins, Rev. Oliver Levey, M.A., Parsonage, Ossett, Wakefield 
Collinson, Rev. H. King, M.A., Stockton-on-Tees 
Collinson, Rev. Rich., B.A., Usworth Parsonage, Gateshead 
Collis, Lieut.-Col., Upcott House, Taunton 
Collyer, Rev. J. B., Hackford Hall, near Reepham 
Colpoys, Rev. J. A. G., M.A., Rector of Droxford, Alton 
Colston, Rev. William, A.M., Broughton Hall, Lechlade 
Colt, Capt. W. O., Rownham House, Southampton 
Commerell, J. W., Esq., Strood Park, Slinfold, near Horsham 
Commons, The Library of the House of, by T. Vardon, Esq. 
Compton, H. C., Esq., M.P., Manor House, Lyndhurst 
Compton, Thomas, Esq., Sompting-Abbots, near Worthing 
Comyns, Rev. John, Wood House, Bishops Teignton, Devon 
Condell, Wm., Esq., Surgeon to the Duke of Devonshire, Baslow 
Constable, Thos., Esq., Manor House, Otley, Yorkshire 
Conyers, Edmund Dade, Esq., Coroner, Driffield 
Conyngham, Rev. John, Weston Rectory, near Norwich 
Coode, Edward, Esq., St. Austell, Cornwall 
Cook, Mr. George, Itteringham, near Aylsham 
Cook, John, Esq., Solicitor, Scarborough, Yorkshire 
Cook, Thos. Linsley, Esq., Wincomblee, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Cook, William, jun., Esq., Solicitor, Pocklington 
Cooke, Rev. Alexander, M.A., Loversal, Doncaster 
Cooke, Charles H., Esq., Benwell Grove, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Cooke, Rev. Stephen, Vicar of Oulton, Knapton Hall, Norfolk 
Cooke, Thomas, Esq., Newclose, Newport, Isle of Wight 
Cooke, Rev. Thomas, Vicarage, Westbury, Wilts 
Cookesley, Rev. H. P., Bungay 
Cookson, Daniel, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 



XIV 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Cookson, Rev. Edward, M.A., Incumbent , of St. Mary's, Leeds 

Cookson, Rev. Francis Thomas, M.A., St. John's Parsonage, Leeds 

Cookson, Isaac Thos., Esq., Newbiggin House, Newcastle-upon- 

Cookson, Thomas, Esq., Swinburne Castle, Hexham [Tyne 

Cookson, William, Esq., Bill Quay, Gateshead 

Coombe, Charles, Esq., Holmes, Broomfield, Somerset 

Coombs, Mr. John, Bratton, Westbury, Wilts 

Coope, Rev. W. J., Rector of Falmouth, Summerland, Cornwall 

Cooper, Rev. Aug., Syleham Hall, near Harleston 

Cooper, Rev. C. B., Morley R,ectory, near Wymondham 

Cooper, Rev. George Miles, Vicar of Wilmington, near Lewes 

Cooper, Rev. Henry, Vicar of Rye, Sussex 

Cooper, John, Esq., North Cove Hall, near Beccles 

Cooper, Mrs., Lympstone, Devon 

Cooper, James Alfred, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford, Yorkshire 

Cooper, John M., Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland, Durham 

Cooper, Samuel, Esq., Solicitor, Sheffield 

Cooper, Rev. William, B.D., Rector of West Rasen, Lincolnshire 

Copeland, William, Esq., Barnard-Castle, Durham 

Copeman, Robert, Esq. Hemsley, near Yarmouth 

Coppard, Thomas, Esq.,Horsham, Sussex 

Corbould, Rev. William, Tacolneston Rectory, Wymondham 

Corby, Robert, Esq., Witlingham, near Norwich 

Corless, Rev.^Geo. Jos. Augustine, D.D.,Thropton Hall, Rothbury 

Cornish, Rev. Sidney W., D.D,., Ottery St. Mary, Devon 

Cory, Samuel, S., Esq., Allingten, Bridport, Dorset 

Cosway, Rev. S., M.A., Chute Vicarage, Wilts 

Cotes, John, Esq., Woodcote, Shiffnall, Salop 

Cotterell, Sir John E., Bart., Garnons, Hereford 

Cotlle, Rev. James, B.A., Incumbent of St. James, Taunton 

Cotton, Benjamin, Esq., Afton House, Freshwater, Yarmouth 

Coulson, John, Esq., Scagglethorpe, Malton [whistle 

Coulson, John Blenkinsopp, Esq., J. P., Blenkinsopp-Hall, Halt- 

Coulthard, James Battin, Esq., Binstead Hill, Bentworth, Alton 

Courtney, Rev. S., Vicar of Charles the Martyr, Plymouth 

Coutts, John, Esq., Wallsend, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Cove, Rev. Edward, B.A., Rector of Thoresway, near Caistor 

Covey, Rev. Charles, Alderton Rectory, Cheltenham 

Cowan, James, Esq., LL.D., Grange, Bishop- Wearmouth 

Coward, Chas. Leach, Esq., Solicitor, Masbrough, Rotherham 

Cowburn, John, Esq., Solicitor, Settle, Yorkshire [Tyne 

Cowen, Messrs. Joseph & Co., Blaydon-Burn, N/ewcastle-upon- 

Cowthorpe, Rev. W., Reetor of Westmeston cum Chillington, Sussex 

Cox, Rev. James, D.D., Hoxne, near Eye, Suffolk 

Cox, Rev. James B., Hatch Beauchamp, Taunton 

Cox, Rev. John Edmund, Aldeby, near Beecles 

Cox &; Co., Messrs., Army Agents, Craig's Court, London 

Cox, William Trevelyan, Esq., Chedington Court, Dorset 

Coxe, Rev. Rich. Chas., M.A., Vicar of Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Coxwell, Geo. S., Esq., St. James, do. 

Craig, Rev. Edward, Burton Latimer, Kettering 

CRAVEN, The Right Honourable the Earl of 

Craven, John, Esq., Low Mill, Keighley, Yorkshire 

Craven, Wm., Esq., Cold Spring House, Cullingworth, Bradford 

Craven, William,,Esq., Clapton Lodge, Halifax 

Crawford, Gibbs, Esq., Paxhill Park, Lindfield, near Cuckfield 

Crawhall, Geo., Esq., New House, Stanhope, Durham 

Crawhall, Joseph, Esq., St. Ann's House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Crawhall, Wm., Esq., Stagshaw Close House, Corbridge 

Crea, Henry, Esq., Whittingham, Alnwick 

Cresswell, Rev. H., A.B., Vicarage, Creech St. Michael, Taunton 

Creswell, John Bowden, Esq., New Court, Topsham, Devon 

CREWE, The Right Honourable Lord 

Creyke, Ralph, Esq., J.P., Rawcliffe Hall, Selby 

Creyke, Rev. Stephen, M.A., Wigginton Rectory, York 

Cripps, J. M. Esq., Novington, near Lewes 

Crofts, John, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford 

Crosse, William, Esq., One House Hall, near Stowmarket 

Grassland, Thomas P., Esq., Crossland Moor, Huddersfield 

Crossley, John, Esq., J.P., ScaitclifFe, Todmorden 

Crow, George, Esq., Ornhams, Boi.oughbr.idge 

Crowe, Mr. William, Ashmanhaugh House, near Coltishajl 

Crowther, George, Esq., Churwell Lane, Leeds 

Crowther, Isaac, Esq., Croft House, Morley, do. 

Crowther, Rev. James, Vicar of Kingsbury-Episcopi, Somersetshire 

Crowthpr, W., Esq., St. John's, Erringden, Halifax 

Cruickshank, Robert, Esq., Anglesey Villa, near Alyeretoke, Ha,nts 

Cubitt, Capt. Henry, Catton, near Norwich 

Culley, Matthew, Esq., J.P., Fowberry Tower, Wooler 

Cunningham, Rev. Rob., M.A., Polmont House, Falkirk [York 

Currer, Rev. Danson Richardson, M.A. & J.P., Clifton House, 

Curteis, Rev. Jeremiah, Shelton Rectory, near Long Stratton 

Curtis, H. Porter, Esq., Romsey, Hants 



Curtis, William, Esq., AHon, Hants 

Curzon, The Hon. and Rev. F. E., Mickleover, Derby 

Daintry, Rev. John, M.A., Shidfield Parsonage, Fareham 

Dallas, Rev. Alexander, R.C., Rector of Wonston, Whitchurci 

Dallin, Rev. R., M.A., Vicar of Rudston, Bridlington 

Dalziel, William, Esq., Long Horsley, Moi-peth 

Daman, Stead, & Tylee, Messrs., Romsey, Hants 

Danby, Rev. Samuel, M.A., Malton, Yorkshire 

Dance, Col. Sir Charles Webb, Barr House, Bishop's Hall, Tauntoa 

Dand, James, jun., Esq., TogstonHall, Alnwick, Northumberland 

Dand, Robert, Esq., Field House, Alnwick 

Daniel, Knights Francis, Esq., Stockesby Cottage, near Acle 

Daniel, Thomas, Esq., Stoodleigh Court, Bampton 

Dare, Charles Holcomb, Esq., North Curry, Taunton 

Darley, Alfred Horatio, Esq., Elvington Hall, York 

Darley, Charles, Esq., Thome, Yorkshire 

Darley, Charles Albert, Esq., Burtonfield, York 

Darley, Henry Brewster, Esq., J.P., Aldby Park, do. 

Darling, George, Esq.,, Helton House, Wooler 

Daubeny, Rev. Giles, M.A., Rector of Lydiard Tregoz, Swindon 

Daubeny, Colonel, K.H., Manse Road Hill, near Frome, Somerset 

Daubuz, J. B., Esq., Offington House, near Worthing 

Davenport, Rev. E. Sharington, Davenport House, Wolverhampton 

Davenport, E. D., Esq., Capesthorne, Congleton 

Davey, Stephen, Esq., D.L., Redruth, Cornwall 

Davey, William, Esq., do. do,. 

Davids, John, Esq., West Cowes, Isle of Wight 

Davidson, Robert, Esq., Revelrig, Currie, Edinburgh 

Davies, Albert, Esq., Rushall Cottage, Pewsey, Wilts 

Davies, Rev. Charles Greenall, M.A.., Trinity Church, Wakefield 

Davies, Rev. David, ]V(.A., Rector of Cliddesdon cum Farleigh 

Davies, J. E., Esq., Holt, Bradford, Wilts 

Davies, Rev. Thomas, Bayton, near Bewdley 

Davis, Rev. John, Ashwick, Old Down, Somerset 

Davis, Robert, Esq., Mayor of Gateshead 

Davison, John, Esq., Brandon White-house, Whittingham 

Davison, Robert Aiskell, Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland 

Davison., William, Esq., Monk-Seaton, North Shields 

Davison, William, Esq., Rothbury 

Davy, Capt. John, R.N., Mount Amelia, Ingoldisthorpe, near Lyna 

Dawe, Hill, Esq., Ditcheat, near Castle-Cary, Somerset 

Dawkins, Colonel Henry, Over Norton House, Oxon 

Dawson, Christopher, Esq., Brandon, Alnwick 

Dawson, C. H., Esq., Royds Hall, Bradford 

Dawson, Rev. Henry, Hopton Rectory, near East Harling 

Dawson, Robert, Esq., Westoe, South Shields 

Dawson, Thomas, Esq., Poundsworth, Driffield 

Dawson, William, Esq., Eldon Square, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Day, Charles, Esq., West Cowes, Isle of Wight 

Day, Rev. Edmund, B.D., Incumbent of Norton, Malton 

Day, Rev. Henry Thomas, LL.D., Mendlesham Vicarage 

Day, Richard, Esq., Bexhill, near St. Leonard's 

Day, Rev. Richard, Blyford, Halesworth 

Dayman,, Henry, Esq., Millbrook, Southampton 

Dayrell, Rev. R. W., Monk-Hopton, Bridgenorth 

Deacle, Rev. Hicks, Vicar , of Dilham and Honing, near Worstead 

Deacon, Rev. George Edward, M.A., Ottery St. Mary, Devonshire 

Dean, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Batley, Yorkshire 

Dean, William, Esq., Scausby Hall, Halifax 

Dearden, James, Esq., The Orchard, Rochdale 

Dees, Robert Richardson, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Delafeld, Rev. John, Vicar of Tertington, near Arundel 

Denison, Edmund Beckett, Esq., M.P., Doncaster 

Denison, Robert, Esq., J.P.j Waplington Manor, PockUngton 

Dennett, Thomas P., Esq.., Storrington, Sussex 

Dennett, William Hugh, Esq., Worthing, do. 

Dennisj Rev. Luke, M.A., Beverley 

Dent, Ralph, Esq., Streatlam Castle, Barnard- Castle 

Dent, Rev. t., Hollin Hall, Billington-Whalley, Blackburn 

De Si, Manoel Reviz', St. Alban's House, Ryde, Isle of Wight 

DeThoren, Baron, Underdown, Ledbury, Herefordshire 

Denjon, John Punshon, Esq., Hartlepool, Durham 

Denton,-S. B., Esq., M.D., Joy Lodge, Hornsea 

Depledg*. Joseph Price, Esq., Glass Works, Gateshead 

Dew, William, Esq., Swanton Novers, Holt 

Dewe, Rev. James Byarn, B.A., Ravenfield, Rotherham 

Dewhurst, .Isaac, Esq., Skipton-in-Craven 

Dewhurst, John, Esq., do. 

Dewhurst, William, jun., Esq., -Ovenden, Halifax 

Dewing, R., jun., Esq., Burnham Overy, near Burnham W'estgate 

Dickins, Charles Scrase, Esq., West Stoke Park, near Chichester 

Dickon, William, Esq., Beal, Ferrybridge, Yorkshire 

Dickson, John M., Esq., Berwick-upon-Tweed 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



xv 



onj W.jEsq;, Clk. of the Peace for Northumberland, Alnwick 
Diggle, Rev. Charles Wadham, Stratfield Turgis, Hartford Bridge 
Dighlon, Rev. Edward, Cranmore, Sheplon Mallet 
DILLON, The Right Honourable Lord Viscount 
Dinning, Henry, Esq., Elford, Belford, Durham 
Dinning, John, Esq., Mavisbush, Lasswade, Edinburgh 
Dinsdale, Robert Moses, Esq., J.P., Newsham Park, Sladndrop 
Ditmas, William, Esq., Beverley 
Dixon, Alexander, Esq., Cleckheaton, Leeds 
Dixon, Dixon, Esq., Unthank Hall, Haltwhistle, Northumberland 
Dixon, Edward, Esq., Saint Cross, Winchester 
Dixon, Rev. John, B.A., Vicar of Brotherton, Ferrybridge 
Dixon, Rev. J., Incumbent of Ingleby-Greenhow and Bilsdale, 
Dixon, Rev. W., Incumbent of East Ardsley, Wakefield [Stokesley 
Dixon, Rev. W. H., M.A., Vicar of Bishopthorpe, and Chaplain to 

[the Archbishop of York 

Dobson, John, Esq., High-Seat House, Newcastle- upon-Tyne 
Dobson, Joseph, Esq., Yorkshire District Bank, Selby 
Dobson, William, Esq., Gouthorpe House, do. 

Docker, Rev. Edmund, B.A., Froxfield and Steep, Hants 
Dodd, Rev. Edward, M.A., Northwood, Isle of Wight 
Dodd, William John, Esq., Monk-Wearmouth, Durham 
Dodds, Isaac, Esq., Hall -Car House, Sheffield 
Dodds, Ralph, Esq., Prudhoe Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
DoJman, Martin, Esq., Titchwell, near Burnham Westgate 
Dodson, Rev. Charles, M.A., Rector of Penton-Mewsey, Hants 
Dodsworth, George, Esq., Fulford, York 
Dolben, W. Mackworth, Esq. Finedon Hall, Wellingborough 
Dolby, Miss, Brizes, Brentwood 
Dolman, Thomas W. L., Esq., Solicitor, Beverley 
Dolphin, Rev. John, South Repps Hall, North Walsham 
Donne, W. B., Esq., South Green, Matteshall, near East Dereham 
Donnison, Rev. J. W. S., Dove House, Mendham, near Harleston 
Donovan, Alexander, Esq., Framfield Park, near Uckfield 
Douglas, Adam Thomson, Esq., Moneylaws, Coldstream 
Douglas, Rev. H., M.A., Whickham Rectory, Gateshead 
Douglas, The Honourable and Rev. James, Broughton Rectory 
Douglas, Rev. Stair, Ashling, near Chichester 
Dove, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Dowdeswell, Rev. C., D.D., Stanford Rivers, Romford, Essex 
Dowell, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland, Durham 
Downe, Rev. George E., Rushdon Rectory, Higham Ferrers 
Dowsing, Rev. Horatio, North Barsham Rectory, near Walsingham 
Dowson, Rev. Henry, M.A., Monk-Frystone, Ferrybridge 
Drake, Sir T. F. E., Bart., Nutwell Court, Woodbury, Devon 
Drake, Thomas, Esq., Ashday Hall, Halifax 
Dransfield, John, Esq., Solicitor, Penistone, Barnsley 
Drayton, John, Esq., Lyme Regis, Dorset 
Drummond, Henry, Esq., Albury Park, Guildford 
Dryden, George, Esq., Bingley, Yorkshire 
Dudley, Rev. Samuel George, B.A., Wilcot, Witney, Oxon 
Duesbery, W. D. Thornton, Esq., J.P., Skelton Hall, Yorkshire 
Duffield, Francis, Esq., Town Hill House, Bradford 
Dugmore, John, jun., Esq., Swaffham 
Duke, Rev. Edward, Lake House, near Amesbury, Wilts 
Duncan, Rev. Joseph R., Manse, Dalkeith, Edinburgh [Tyne 
Dunn, Alderman G. T., Esq., J.P., Bath House, Newcastle-upon- 
Dunn, Richard, Esq., Heath House, Wakefield 
Dunn, Thomas, Esq., Mayor of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1843 
Dunn, Thomas, Esq., Richmond Hill, Sheffield 
Duppa, Thomas, Esq., Eardington, Bridgenorth, Salop 
Durant, George, Esq., Tong Castle, Salop 
Durnford, Mrs., Goodworth Clatford, Andover 
Durrani, George, Esq., South Elmham Hall, Harlestone 
Durrant, Sir T. H. Estridge, Bart., Scottow Hall, near Norwich 
Dusantry, Rev. William S., M.A., Rector of Exton, Alton, Hants 
Dyke, Rev. T. Hart, M.A., Rector of Long Newton, Stockton-on- 
Dyson, Jeremiah, Esq., Willow Field, Halifax [Tees 

Eadon, Henry, Esq., Snaith, Yorkshire 
Eagles, Ezra, Esq., Bedford 

Eamonson, Rev. B., M.A., Vicarage, Collingham, Wethevby 
Earle, Henry, Esq., Andover, Hants [Yorkshire 

Easterby, Rev. Richard D., M.A., Appleton-le-Street, Malton, 
Easton, Josiah, Esq., Pawlett, near Bridgwater 
Eastwood, John, Esq., Eastwood, Todmorden 
Eastwood, William, Esq., Solicitor, Patmos Cottage, do. 
Eaton, George, Esq., Spixworth, Norwich 
Ebbetts, John, Esq., Cley Old Hall, Cley 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners, The, Whitehall 
Ecroyd, Benj., Esq., Ashfield Terrace, Bradford 
Eddie, Wm. Hesleden, Esq., Barton-upon-Humber 
Eddison, Edwin, Esq., Town Clerk of Leeds 
Edgell, Admiral II. H., Standerwick Court, near Beckington 



Edmondson, John, Esq., Mytholmroyd, Halifax 
Edmunds, Rev. Edward, B.A., Chester-le-Street, Durham 
Edwards, Rev. Edward, AJM., F.A.S., Lynn 
Edwards, Rev. Edwin, Perpetual Curate of Ashford cum Thorpe- 
Edwards, G. N M Esq., Henlow, Biggleswade 
Edwards, Samuel Bedford, Esq., Arlesey Bury, Biggleswade 
Edwards, Thomas* Esq., Stoketon,, near Saltash, Cornwall 
Edwards, T. P.,, Esq., Millbrook, near Southampton 
Edwards, William, Esq., Great Elm, near Frome, Somerset 
Edwards, William, Esq., Framlingham 
Eedle, Rev. Edward, Vicar of Bersted, near Bognor 
Egerton, Francis Thomas, Esq., D.L., Roche Court, Salisbury 
Egles, Gabriel, Esq., Southover, Lewes, Sussex 
EGREMONT, The Right Honourable the Earl of 
Egremont, Rev. Godfrey G., Vicar of Barrow-upon-Humber 
Elam, John, Esq., Gildersome, Leeds 
Eld, Francis, Esq., Seighford Hall, near Stafford 
Elkins, Edward, Esq., Newman Street, London 
Ellershaw, Rev. Henry, M.A., Conisbrough, Rotherham . 
Ellerton, Edward, Esq., Garforth, Leeds 
Ellerton, George, Esq., Kippax, Pontefract 
Elletson, John, Esq., Howden, Yorkshire 
Elliot, Rev. Wm. Henry, M.A., Curate of Scarborough 
Elliott, Rev. E., B.A., Incumbent of New Mill, Huddersfield 
Elliott, John, Esq., Assistant Clerk of the Peace for Northumher- 
Elliott, William Elliott, Esq., Gedling House, Notts [laud 

Ellis, George, Esq., Tiogley House, Dewsbury 
Ellis, James, Esq., Green Hill, Bingley 
Ellis, John, Esq., High House, Addingham 
Ellis, John Luttman, Esq., Petworth, Sussex 
Ellis, John, Esq., Dewsbury 
Ellis, Joshua, Esq., Highfield House, Dewsbury 
Ellis, William, Esq., Yew Tree House, Morley, Leeds 
Ellison, Rich., Esq., Solicitor, Tickhill, Yorkshire 
Ellison, Rev. Thomas Noel, Rectory, Huntspill, Bridgwater 
Elmhirst, Rev. George, B.A., Leeds 
Elsley, C. H., Esq., Recorder of York 
Elswood, A., Esq., Bungay, Suffolk 
Elwes, R. C., Esq., Great Billing, Northampton 
Embleton, Dennis, Esq., M.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Embleton, Robert, Esq., of Embleton, Alnwick 
Emerson, T., Esq., Blaydon Lead- Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Emly, Henry, Esq., 3, New Square, Lincoln's Inn, London 
Emmet, John, Esq., Ovendon Grange, Halifax 
Empson, Amezia, Esq., Spellow Hill, Boroughbridge 
Empson, Jarvis, Esq., Goole Hall, Yorkshire 
Enfield, H., Esq., Nottingham 
England, George, Esq., Westbury, Wilts 
England, Richard, Esq., Binham, near Wells 

Erskine, The Hon. & Rev. H. D., M.A., & J.P., Kirby-under-Dale 
Esdaile, Edward Jeffries, Esq., Cothelstone House, Bishops-Lydeard 
Etty, Rev. S. J., M.A., Wootton Vicarage, Basingstoke 
Etwall, Ralph, Esq., M.P., Longslock-Down, Hauls 
Etnrell, William, Esq., Penton Lodge, Andover 
Evans, Thomas, Esq., Hereford 
Evans, Thomas, Esq., Lyminster, near Arundel 
Everard, Rev. Daniel, Burnham-Thorpe, near Burnham-Market 
Everelt, Joseph, Esq., Heylesbury, Wills 
Every, Sir Henry, Barl., Egginglon, near Derby 
Ewbank, Jas., Esq., Redcar House, and Middleham, Yorkshire 
Ewbank, William, Esq., Dalby, Whilwell, York 
Ewen, J. L., Esq., Valewood, near Hazelmere, Surrey 
Exall, William, Esq., Amery House, Allon, Hants 
EXCISE, Her Majesty's Honourable Commissioners of 
Eyre, Rev. A. W., B.A., Vicar of Hornsea and Rector of Rislon 
Eyre, Rev. Charles Wolff, M.A., Hooton- Roberts, Rotherham 
Eyre, Rev. James, LL.B., North Dalton, Beverley 
Eyre, Rev. W., M.A., Rector of Sherfield-upon-Loddon, Hants 
Eyton, Thomas C., Esq., Donnerville, Wellington, Salop 
Fairbairn, Peter, Esq., Park Square, Leeds 
Falconar, James, Esq., F.S.A., Solicitor, Doncaster 
Falkner, Henry, Esq., Southwell, Notts 
FALMOUTH, The Right Honourable the Earl of 
Fanshawe, Rev. Charles Simon, M.A., Rector of Fawley, Bucks 
Fanshawe, Rev. John Faithful, M.A., Incumbent ot Lanchester 
Farley, Rev. Thomas, B.D., Rector of Ducklington, Oxon 
Farnall, H. Burrard, Esq., Lyme Regis, Dorset 
Farrell, Rev. Maurice, Cardington, Bedford 
Farrer, John, Esq., Grove House, Pudsey, Leeds 
Farrer & Co., Messrs., Lincoln's Inn Fields, London 
Farwell, Rev. William, Rector of St. Martin's, Liskeard 
Faulds, Andrew, Esq., Darley Hall, Barnsley 
Fawcett, Rev. Christopher, M.A., Bascombe Rectory, Amesbury 



XVI 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Fawcett, Richard, Esq., Shipley Hall, Bradford 
Fawcett, Rev. Robert, B.A., Incumbent of Hilton and Vicar of 
Fawcus, John, Esq., North Shields [Marlon in Cleveland 

Fayrer, Rev. Robert, Incumbent of Emmanuel Church, Camberwell 
Fearne, Charles, Esq., Leeds 

Fellowes, Rev. Charles. Rector of Shotlesham, near Norwich 
Fellowes, Captain Sir Thomas, Knt. C.B., R.N., Gosport, Hants 
Fendall, Rev. Henry, B.A., Vicar of Crambe, Whitwell, York 
Fenton, Rev. George, Vicarage, Roystone, Barnsley 
Fenton, J. C.. Esq., Solicitor, Huddersfield 
Fenton, Kirkby, Esq.. Leventhorp House, Leeds 
Fennyhough, Joseph, Esq., Yoxhall, near Burton-on-Trent 
Fenwick, Rev. C. Forster, B.C.L., Brook Parsonage, Isle of Wight 
Fenwick, H., Esq., Solicitor, Red Barns, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Fenwick, Henry Win., Esq., Stand House, do. 

Fenwick, John, Esq., J.P., PrestonVilla, North Shields 
Fenwick, John, Esq., Camp Ville, do. 

Fenwick, John Man ers, Esq., J.P., Gallow Hill House, Morpeth 
Fenwick, John William, Esq., Solicitor, North Shields 
Fenwick, T. Wm., Esq., Claremont Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Ferguson, Charles, Esq., Sunderland 
Ferguson, Thomas, Esq, Gateshead Low Fell, Durham 
Fernandes, Joze Luis, Belle Vue, Wakefield 
Ferrand, W. Busfeild, Esq., M.P., Harden Grange, Bingley 
Ferris, Rev. Thomas Boys, M.A., Incumbent of St. Luke's, Leeds 
Testing, Thomas Colson, Esq., Blagdon Court, near Bristol 
Fetherstonhaugh, Timothy, Esq., Kirk-Oswald, Penrith 
FEVERSHAM, The Right Honourable Lord 
Fewtrell, Edwin Alford, Esq., Grammar School, Rotherham 
Fidler, Rev. I., B.A., Incumbent of Kelbrook-in -Thornton, Craven 
Fielden, Brothers, Messrs., Todmorden, Yorkshire 
Fielding, James, Esq., Kerr House, Skircoat, Halifax 
Fife, George, Esq., M.D., Sunderland 

Fife, Wm. Henry, Esq., Kllison Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Fillingham, G., Esq., Syerston, near Newark, Notts 
Finch, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Chaplain to the County Gaol and Curate 
Firth, Henry Josiah, Esq., Rose Hill, Rotherham [of Morpetli 

Firth, James, Esq., Upper House, Bowling, Bradford 
Firth, Thomas, Esq., Toothill, Huddersfield 
Fischer, Charles Anthony, Esq., Walton, Wetherby 
Fish, Richard, Esq., Blickling, near Aylsham 
Fisher, Edward, Esq., Spring Dale, Huddersfield 
Fisher, Frederick, Esq., Solicitor, Doncaster, Yorkshire 
Fisher, Henry B., Esq., Conisborough, Doncaster 
Fisher, Joseph, Esq., Cleeve, Yatton, near Bristol 
Fisher, Mr. Robert, Chitterne, Heytesbury, Wilts 
Fisher, Rev. Thomas, Luccombe, Somerset 
Fishlake, Rev. J. R., Little Cheverel, Devizes, Wilts 
Fitzgerald, Rev. R., B.A., Southington Cottage, Overton, Hants 
Fitzroy, Rev. F. T. W. C., Ringstead Rectory, near Lynn 
FITZ WILLIAM, The Right Honourable the Earl, 2 copies 
Flavell, Rev. J. W., Rector of Ridlington, North Walsham 
Flavell, Rev. J. W., Rector of Stody with Hanworth, Holt 
Fletcher, Rev. John, M.A., Meaux Abbey, Beverley 
Fletcher, Joseph, Esq., Rawcliffe, Goole, Yorkshire 
Flood, Christopher, Esq., Honiton, Devon 
Flood, Samuel, Esq., Leeds 
Floud, H. Ehq., Upper Tooting, Surrey 
Floyd, C. S., Esq., Solicitor, Huddersfield 
Foljambe, Thomas, Esq., Holme Field, Thornes, Wakefield 
Folkes, Sir W.B., Bart., Hillington Hall, near Lynn 
Foote, Ambrose, Esq., Ivy Cottage, West Cowes, Isle of Wight 
Forbes, Henry, Esq., Lister Terrace, Bradford 
Ford, Rev. Frederick, M.A., Bramshott, Hants 
Ford, Robert L., Esq., Park Place, Leeds 
Forge, Rev. C., M.A., Incumbent of Mapleton, Hornsea 
Forrest, The Right Hon. Sir James, Bart., Lord Provost and Lord 
[Lieutenant of the City of Edinburgh 
Forster, Rev. John, M.A., Rector of Ryther, Selby 
Forster, Rev. John, M.A., Rector of Wickersley, Rotherham 
Forster, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Rector of Edmondbyers, Gateshead 
Forster, Richard Carnaby, Esq., White House, Gateshead 
Forster, Colonel T. W., Halls, Holt, near Melksham 
Forster, William, Esq., Solicitor, Alnwick 
Forster, William Edward, Esq., Bradford 
Forster, William John, Esq., Tynemouth 
Forsyth, Thomas, Esq., Wellington Terrace, South Shields 
Foster, Rev. A., B.C.L., Kingston, Taunton 
Foster, George, Esq., Cliff House, Horbury 
Foster, John, Esq., Solicitor, Pontefract 
Foster, John, Esq., Solicitor, Driffield 
Foster, John, Esq., Heptonstall Slack, Hebden-bridge 
Foster, John W., Esq., Clapham, Settle, Yorkshire 



Foster, Thomas, Esq., Stainforth, Settle 
Foster, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Rector of Falstone, Hexham 
Foster, William, Esq., Solicitor, Settle 
Foster, W. & H., Messrs., Denholme, Bradford 
Fothergill, Mark, Esq., Solicitor, Selby, Yorkshire 
Fountaine, A. Esq., Narford Hall, near SwafFham 
Fowler, Oliver, Esq., Kingsclere, Hants 
Fowlis, Mark, Esq., J.P., Heslerton House, Malton 
Fox, George Colton, Esq., Toclwick Grange, Sheffield 
Fox, John, Esq., Daisy Lee, Lindley, Huddersfield 
Fox, John, Esq., Cleobury Mortimer, Salop 
Fox, John, Esq., Woodthorpe, near Nottingham 
Fox, Rev. Thomas H. Lane, Vicar of Sturminster Newton, Dorset 
Fox, William Johnson, Esq., Solicitor, Hatfield, Doncaster 
Foyster, Rev. H. S., Hastings 

Foyster, Rev. J. G., Rector of All Saints, and St. Clements, Hastings 
Francis, George Edward, Esq., West End Cottage, Martham 
Francis, Thomas, Esq., Mendlesham 
Francklin, John, Esq., Gonalston, Southwell, Notts 
Franklyn, Rev. Thomas Ward, Castle House, Tonbridge Wells 
Freeman, Thomas, Esq., Ship Street, Brighton 
Freke, Colonel Henry, C.B., Hannington Hall, Highworth, Wilts 
French, Richard D., St. John, llket&hall, near Bungay 
French, Thomas, Esq., Eye, Suffolk 

Friend, William, Esq., Hart Plain House, Catherington, Hants 
Frost, Rev. Joseph Loxdale, M.A., Bingley 
Frowd, Rev. Edward, M.A., Rector of Up. Clatford, Hants 
Fryer, Joseph Harrison, Esq., J.P., Whitley House, North Shields 
Fryer, Rev. H. Edmund, M.A., Burley Wood, East Woodhay, Hants 
Fulford, Colonel Baldwin, Great Fulfbrd, near Exeter 
Fulford, Rev. Francis, Rector of Trowbridge, Wilts 
Fuller, John, Esq., Shaw Hill, Halifax, Yorkshire 
Fuller, Rev. R. Fitzherbert, Lingfield Lodge, near East Grinstead 
Furbank, Rev. T., M.A., Incumbent of Bramley, Leeds 
Furner, William, Esq., Brighton, Sussex [Tyne 

Furness, Rev. J. R., M. A., Vicar of Dinnington, Newcastle-upon- 
Gaggs, Thomas, Esq., Howden, Yorkshire 
Gale, Edward Morant, Esq., Upham House, Bishop's Waltham 
Gale, Rev. J., Rector of Angersleigh, Taunton 
Gale, Rev. John Shephard, S.C.L., Hurstbourne Tarrant, Andover 
Gale, William, Esq., North Fambridge Hall, Maldon 
Garbert, Jonathan, Esq., Hartlepool 
Garbett, Edmund, Esq., Wellington, Salop 
Gardiner, George, Esq., Guisley, Leeds, Yorkshire 
Gardiner, Rev. R. B., Vicar of Wadhurst, Sussex 
Gardiner, Rev. Robert, Uffculm, Devon 
Gardiner, Rev. Robert, Wellisford House, Somerset 
Gardner, Rev. C., Vicar of East Uean cum Friston, near Eastbourne 
Gardner, Rev. Dr., Sansaw, Shrewsbury 
Garforth, Thomas, Esq., Elmsley House, Steeton, Keighley 
Garland, John, Esq., Netherwood Hall, Wombwell, Barnsley 
Garnett, Richard, Esq., Hill Side, Bradford 

Gamier, The Very Rev. Thomas, Dean of Winchester, Bishop's Stoke 
Garrett, J. G. Esq., Portsdown Cottage, Hants 
Garwood, John, Esq., Solicitor, Hartlepool 
Gascoigne, William, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 
Gaskell, Benjamin, Esq., J.P., Thornes House, Wakefield 
Gaunt, Matthew, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 
Gauntlett, Rev. H., M.A., Cncklade, Wilts 
Gay, James, Esq., Thurning Hall, near East Dereham 
Geach, Edward, Esq., Liskt-aid, Cornwall 
Geare, John, jun., Esq., Exeter 
Gedge, Rev. Joseph, Vicar of Humberston, Grimsby 
Geldard, John, Esq., South Benwell House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Geldart, Rev. James W., LL.D., R.P.C.L., Cantab., Rector of 
Gell, F. Harding, Esq., Lewes, Sussex [Deighton, Yorkshire 

George, Rev. W. H., Spaxton Rectory, Bridgwater 
Gibbs, Charles, Esq., Bishop's-Lydeard, Taunton, Somerset 
Gibbs, H. C., Esq., 58, Old Broad Street, London 
Gibson, Sir Alex. C. Maitland, Bart., Clifton-hall, Kirkliston, Edin- 
Gibson, Rev. Alfred A., Bradley, Basingstoke, Hants [burgh 

Gibson, Jasper, Esq., Hexham, Northumberland 
Gibson, Rev. John, M.A., Bedlington, Morpeth, Northumberland 
Giffard, Rev. James, M.A., Vicar of W notion, Barrow-upon-Hum- 
Gilbert, Mrs. Davies, Eastbourne, Sussex [her, Lincolnshire 

Gilbert, Major Edward, Bartley Lodge, Southampton 
Gilbert, Thomas Webb, Esq., Philpot Lane, London 
Gilchrist, George, Esq., Berwick-upon-Tweed 
Gilderdale, Rev. John, M.A., Lecturer of the Parochial Church, 
[Halifax, Edgerton Lodge, Huddersfield 
Gills, Robert, Esq., Eldon Square, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Oilman, S. H. L. N., Esq., Hingham 
Gilpin, Rev. Bernard, Burnham-Market, Norfolk 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



XVtl 



Girdlestone, Steed, Esq., Stebbington, near Wansford 
Girling, Captain T. A., The Grove, near Holt 
Gisborne, Matthew, Esq., Walton Hall, Burton-upon-Trent 
Gleadall, Charles, Esq., Solicitor, Halifax, Yorkshire 
Glenton, Frederick, Esq., Bensham Lunatic Hospital, Gateshead 
Glover, The Ven. Archdeacon, South Repps, near North Walsham 
Glover, Jeremiah, Esq., Field Head, Wakefield 
Glover, Robert Mortimer, Esq., M.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Goddird, Rev. Edward, Vicar of Pagham, near Chichester 
Godfrey, T. S., Esq., Balderton Hall, Newark 
Godson, S. Holmes, Esq., Tenbury, Salop 
Godson, William, Esq., Sandall Grove, Doncaster 
Goff, Joseph, Esq., Hale House, Salisbury 
Goldfrap, Mrs., Clenchwarton Rectory, near Lynn 
Goldie, Rev. Thomas Smith, Minister of Coldstream 
Golding, Samuel, Esq., Lodge, Walsham-le- Willows, near Ixworth 
Goldney, Gab., Esq., Chippenham, Wilts 

Goldsworthy, Major John, Ackworth House, Pontefract [Halifax 
Gooch, Rev. J. Henry, M.A., Head Master of Grammar School, 
Gooch, James, Esq., East Dereham, Norfolk 
Gooch, J. W., Esq., Wooton Place, near Bungay 
Goodall, \Villiam, Esq., The Heath, Halifax 

Goodenough, Rev. R. W., M.A., Vicarage, Whittingham, Alnwick 
Goodman, S., Esq., West Chevington, Felton, Northumberland 
Goodman, Timothy, Esq., Warminster, Wilts 
Goodrich, John, Esq., Hopton, near East Harling 
Goodricke, William, Esq., Houghton-le-Spring, Durham 
Goodwin, Charles, Esq., Cobland House, Totton, Eling, Hants 
Gordon, Charles, Esq., Wescombe Park, Honiton, Devon 
Gordon, Captain Conway, E.I.C.S., 16, Crescent, Southampton 
Gordon, Rev. Hastings, M.A., The Minister of Beverley 
Gordon, Captain James, R.N., Whitby, Yorkshire 
X->oring, H. i)., Esq., M.P., Highden, near Shoreham 
Gorring, H. B., Esq., Seaford, Sussex 
Gould, Rev. J. N., B.A., Amberd House, Taunton 
Gould, John Scott, Esq., Moredon, North Curry, near Taunton 
Gower, Captain Leveson, Bill Hill, near W r okingham 
Gowler, Henry, Esq., Rammidge Cottage, Weyhill, Hants 
Graburn, William, Esq., Solicitor, Barton-upon-Humber 
Grace, Edward N., Esq., Byker-hill, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Grace, Rev. Henry Thomas, Vicar of Westham, near Eastbourn 
Grace, John, Esq., Wallsend, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Grace, Nathaniel, Esq., Scotswood House, Newcasile-upon-Tyne 
Graham, Edward, Esq., The Hall, Worth, near Crawley 
Graham, Michael, Esq., Solicitor, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire 
Grahamsley, George, Esq., Laverick Hall, Boldon, Gateshead 
Grainge, Middleton, Esq., Sunnyside, Gateshead 
Grant, Mr. Jonathan, East Coulston, Devizes, Wilts 
Grant, Rev. Robert, Vicar of Bradford-Abbas, Dorset 
Grant, William, Esq., Stubbington Lodge, near Portsmouth 
Grantham, S., Esq., Stoneham, near Lewes 
Grantham. Rev. Thomas, Bramber Rectory, Steyning, Sussex 
Gratwick, W. G. K., Esq., Ham, near Arundel 
Graves, Rev. Henry, Rector of Middleton St. George, Darlington 
Gray, Edward, Esq., Garesfield House, Gateshead 
Gray, John, Esq., East Lilburn, Wooler, Northumberland 
Gray, John, Esq., Pagans Hill House, Chew-Stoke, near Bristol 
Gray, Russell, Esq., Barcombe, near Lewes, Sussex 
Grazebrook, Thomas W. Smith, Esq., Dallicott House, Claverley 
Greame, Yarburgh, Esq., J.P., Sewerby House, Bridlington 
Greaves, Robert D., Esq., Potternewton Lodge, Leeds 
Green, A., Esq., Parkgate, Ringmer, near Lewes 
Green, Atkinson & Co., Messrs., Engineers, Wakefield 
Green, Edwin, Esq., Havercroft, Wakefield, Yorkshire 
Green, Mrs. Elizabeth, Crossland Moor, Huddersfield 
Green, Mrs. E. W., Holcombe House, Somersetshire 
Green, Henry, Esq., Moreton, near Newport, Salop 
Green, James, Esq., Holcombe, near Old Down, Somerset 
Green, John, Esq., Darlington 

Green, Messrs. John & B., Architects & Engineers, Newcastle- 
Green, Rev. John Samuel, M.A., Vicar of Wooler [upon-Tyne 
Green, Thomas, Esq., Ipswich, Suffolk 

Green, Thomas Abbott, Esq., Pavenham, Bury, near Bedford 
Green, Rev. Valentine, M.A., Rector of Birkin, Ferrybridge 
Greenfield, Rev. B. W., M.A., Shirley, Southampton 
Greenhow, Edward, Esq., M.D., Dockwray-square, North Shields 
Greenhow, E. Headlam, Esq., Tynemouth, Northumberland 
Greenside, Rev. Ralph, M.A., Rector of Crathome, Yarm 
Greenstreet, Major-General, Brampton, Hants 
Greeriwell, Richard, Esq., Sunderland 

Greenwood, Edwin, Esq., J.P., Knowle, Keighley, Yorkshire 
Greenwood, James, Esq., Woodlands, Haworth, Keighley 
Greenwood, Joseph, Esq., J.P., Spring Head, do. 
VOL. I. 



Greenwood, Richard, Esq., Solicitor, Gargrave, Skipton 
Greenwood, Wm., jun., Esq., Oxenhope-hall, Haworth, Bradford 
Greenwood, William Brookwood, Esq., Hinton-Ampner, Hants 
Gregory, Rev. H., M.A., Grammar School, Witney 
Greig, James Robiason, Esq., Chiltley, Liphook, Hants 
Gretton, John, Esq., Burton-upon-Trent, Staffordshire 
Grey, G., Esq., Middle Ord, Berwick-upon-Tweed 
Grey, George Annett, Esq.,Milfield Hill, Wooler 
Grey, Thomas Robinson, Esq., J.P., Norton, Stockton-on-Tees 
Griesbach, Rev. W. R., M.A., Vicar of Millington, Givendale, & 
[Friday Thorpe, Pockiington, Yorkshire 
Griffith, Rev. Robert C., Corsley Rectory, near Warminster 
Grigg, Thomas, Esq., Earsham, near Bungay 
Grimmer, George, Esq., Manse House, Haddiscoe, near Beccles 
Gtimston, Henry Estouteville, Esq., Lingcroft, York 
Grooby, Rev. James, Vicar of Swindon, Wilts 
Groves, Captain, Calverleigh, Tiverton, Devon 
Grylls, Glynn, Esq., Helston, Cornwall 
Gully, John, Esq., Ackworth-park, Pontefract 
Gunn, Rev. John, Irstead Rectory, near Norwich 
Gurdon, Rev- Edward, Reymerston, near East Dereham 
Gurdon, Rev. Philip, Cranworth, near Shipdham, Norfolk 
Gurney, Daniel, Esq., F.A.S., North Runcton Hall, near Lynn 
Gurney, Joseph J., Esq., Earlham Hall, near Norwich 
Gurney & Birkbeck, Messrs., Norwich 
Guy, Joseph, Esq., Solicitor, Gainsborough 
Gwyn, John Fraunceis, Esq., Ford Abbey, Thorncombe, Devon 
Gwyn, W., Esq., Tasburgh Lodge, near Long-Stratton 
Haggie, Robert Hood, Esq., Willington, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Hague, John, Esq., J.P., Dewsbuiy & Drighlington 
Haigh, George, Esq., Bradford 

Haigh, Rev. J..M.A., Incumbent of St. Thomas's, Crooke, Sheffield 
Haigh, S. Wood, Esq., Terrace Cottage, Mirfield, Dewsbury 
Haigh, Thomas, Esq., Newlaiths Grange, Leeds 
Hailstone, Edward, Esq., Horton Hall, Bradford 
Hale, Edward, Esq., Hambledon, Hants 
Hale, Matthew, Esq., Manor House, Dewsbury 
Hale, R. Hale Blagden, Esq., Cottle's House, Melksham 
Hale, Rev. Robert, M.A., Settrington House, Malton 
Hall, Rev. E. M., M.A., Incumbent of Idle, Bradford 
Hall, G. Blyth, Esq., Stafford 
Hall, James, Esq., Scorbrough, Beverley 
Hall, Major Jasper, Malshanger, Basingstoke 
Hall, John, Esq., Kiveton Park, Sheffield 

Hall, Rev. John, Rector of Upper Stondon, and Vicar of Shillington 
Hall, Nathaniel, Esq., New Hall, near Henfield, Steyning 
Hall, Procter, Esq., Solicitor, Keighley 
Hall, Rev. T., Ropsley Rectory, Grantham, Lincolnshire 
Hall, Thomas R., Esq., Holly Bush House, Burton-upon-Trent 
Hall, Thomas, jun., Esq., J.P., Purston Lodge, Pontefract 
Hall, William, Esq., Thorpland Hall, near Fakenham 
Hallewell, Benjamin, Esq., Woodhouse, Leeds 
Halliday, Rev. Edmund, Trowbridge, Yard House, Taunton 
Haly, Aylmer, Esq., Wadhurst Castle, near Tonbridge 
Hambly, Edward, Esq., Wadebridge, Cornwall 
Hamerton, James, Esq., M.A., Hellifield Peel, Skipton 
Hamilton, Rev. James, Rector of Ardingley, near Cuckfield 
Hammond, Rev. J. Parish, Rector of Minestead-with-Lyndhurst 
Hammond, Joseph, Leominster, Herefordshire 
Hamond, A., Esq., WestacreHigti House, near Swaffham 
Hamond, Miss, Swaffham 

Hamond, Rev. William, M A., Holdenhurst, Christchurch 
Hampton, Rev. H., Rector of Little Birch, Herefordshire 
Hanbury, Edward, Esq., Bloomville Hall, Hacheston 
Hanbury, Rev. George, Westacre, near Swaffham 
Hanbury, William, Esq., Moreton House, Colwich, Stafford 
Hand, Rev. John, LL.B., Rector of Handsworth, Sheffield 
Hankinson, Rev. Robert, Walpole St. Andrew, near Lynn 
Hanks, James, Esq., Snaith 

Hanmer, Sir John, Bart., Bettisfield Park, near Whitchurch, Salop 
Hanson, George, Esq., Wilsden, Bradford 
Harbin, George, Esq., Newton House, Yeovil, Somerset 
Harboltle, John, Esq., Anick Grange, Hexham 
Harcourt, Rev. C. G. V.,M.A., Whitton Tower, Rothbury 
Harcourt, Rev. L. Vernon, West Dean House, near Chichester 
Hardcastle, Frederick, Esq., Commercial Bank, Halifax 
Hardcastle, Timothy, Esq., Scalby House, Scarborough 
Hardcaslle, William, Esq., Stainley House, Ripley 
Hardman, C. F., Esq., Castledown, Hastings 
Hardy, John, Esq., M.P., 3, Portland Place, London 
Hardy, John, Esq., 7, Beaumont-street, Oxford 
Hardy, Thomas, Esq., Birksgate, Huddersfield 
Hare, Rev. H. J., Docking Hall, Docking 



XV111 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



HARE WOOD, The Right Honourable the late Earl of 

Harford, Rev. Alfred, Vicar of Locking, near Cross, Somerset 

Hargrave, Joseph, Esq., Monckton Villa, South Shields 

Hargrave & Sons, Messrs. James, Kirkstall, Leeds 

Hargrave, William, Esq., St. James' Lodge, do. 

Harison, W. T., Esq., Folkington, near Eastbourne, Sussex 

Harland, William Charles, Esq., M.P., Sutton Hall, York 

Harle, William Lockey, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Harman, Thomas Leader, Esq., Westwood Park, Southampton 

Harneis, Theophilus, Esq., Thorganby Hall, Lincolnshire 

Harris, Alfred, Esq., Spring Lodge, Bradford 

Harris, Charles, Esq., Fulford Grange, Yorkshire 

Harris, Henry, Esq., Heaton Hall. Bradford 

Harris, John, Esq., Civil Engineer, Darlington 

Harris, J. D., Esq., Hayne, Launceston, Cornwall 

Harris, William, Esq., Brereton, Rugeley, Staffordshire 

Harrison, Anthony, Esq., Loygate Cottage, South Shields 

Harrison & Brown, Messrs., Solicitors, Wakefield 

Harrison, Edward, Esq., Settle, Yorkshire 

Harrison, James, Esq., Architect, Sheffield, Yorkshire 

Harrison, Robert, Esq., Benningholme Hall, Hull 

Harrison, Stephen Wright, Esq., Solicitor, Tynemouth 

Harrison, Washington, Esq., Knowsley Cottage, Driffield 

Harrison, Rev. W. B., Rector of Gayton-le-Marsh, Lincolnshire 

Harrison, Rev. William Gorst, M.A., Hart, Hartlepool 

Hartley, George, Esq., Settle, Craven, Yorkshire 

Hartley, Rev. J., B.A., Incumbent of Boroughbridge 

Hartley, James, Esq., The Green, Sunderland 

Hartley, S. F., Esq., Shaw Hill, Halifax 

Harvey, Richard, Esq., St. Day, Truro, Cornwall 

Harvey, Robert R., Esq., Sturminster Newton, Dorset 

Harvey, William, Esq., St. George's Place, Barnsley 

Hasker, Rev. William, M. A., Baughurst, Basingstoke, Hants 

Hasler, Richard, Esq., Aldingbourne House, near Chichsster 

Hasted, J . S., Esq., R.N., Tarrington Gurney, Old Down, Somerset 

HASTINGS, The Right Honourable Lord 

Hatherell, Rev. J. W., Rectory, Charmouth, Dorset 

Hattall, H., Esq., Rose House, Stockbridge, Hants 

Hawdon, Robert, Esq., Mayor of Morpeth, 1843. [Tyne 

Hawdon, William G., Esq., Blaydon-foundry, Newcastle-upon- 

HAWKE, The Right Honourable Lord 

Hawke, Edward, jun., Esq., Knottingley, Ferrybridge 

Hawker, Lieut. -Col., Longparish House, Hants 

Hawker, Rear-Adml., K.C.H., Ashford Lodge, Petersfield 

Hawkins, John E., Esq., Manor House, Faringdou, Hants 

Hawks, George, Esq., J.P., Redheugh, Gat^shead 

Hawks, Joseph, Esq., Sheriff of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1843 

Hawortlh, Benjamin, Esq., M.A., J.P., Hull Bank House, Hull 

Hawthorn, William, Esq., C.E., The Cottage, Benwell, Newcastle 

Hay, The Hon. and Rev.Somerville, Curate of Bergh-Apton 

Hay, William, Esq., Park-square, Leeds 

Haydon, W., Esq., Mill Mead House, Guildford 

Hayne, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Incumbent of Rastrick, Huddersfield 

Haynes, Robert, Esq., Bellavista House, Westbury, Wilts 

Haythorne, Rev. Joseph, Vicar of Congresbury, Somerset 

Hayward, George, Esq., Headingley Hall, Leeds 

Hayward, John, Esq., West Chinnock, near Crewkerne 

Haywood, John, Esq., Rotherham 

Head, Charles, Esq., Solicitor, Hexham 

Head, Rev. Oswald, M.A., Vicar of Lesbury, Alnwick 

Heald, Rev. W. M., M.A., Vicar of Birstal, Leeds 

Heath, Rev. Charles, Hanworth, near Aylsham 

Heath, Thomas, Esq., Horning, Norwich 

Heathcote, J. M., Esq., Connington Castle, Hiihts 

Heathcote, William Arthur, Esq., Rolleston, Shrewton, Wilts 

Heaton, John, Esq., St. John's Cottage, Little Woodhouse, Leeds 

Heaton, William Barnard, Esq., Solicitor, Gainsborough 

Hedley, Edward Anthony, Esq., M.D., Link Hall, Alnwick 

Hedley, Samuel, Esq., Coxlodge Cottage, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Hedley, Thomas, Esq., Shieldfield, do. 

Heelis, Thomas, Esq., Skipton Castle 

Heigham, John Henry, Esq., Hunston Hall, near Ixworth 

Heffill, Henry, Esq., Diss, Norfolk 

Hellyer, Thomas, Esq., Ryde, Isle of Wight 

Hembrough, John, Esq., Waltham, Grimsby, Lincolnshire 

Heming, Rev. H., Lurgashall, near Petworth, Sussex 

Hemmingway, Edward, Esq., Oulton Green, Leeds 

Henderson, Lieut.-Col., late Royal Engineers, Southampton 

Henderson, Capt. Gro., R.N., Berkeley Cottage, Bruton, Somerset 

Hennah, Rev. W. Veale, B.A., Minister of St. James, East Cowes 

Henty, Sam., Esq., Kingston, near Little Hampton, Sussex 

Henville, Rev. C. B., M.A., Hamble-le-Rice, Southampton 

Ilenzell, Charles Rutherford, Esq., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 



Hepper, James, Esq., Canal Cottage, Shipley, Bradford 
Hepworth, Abraham, Esq., Lindley, Huddersfield 
Hepworth. Rev. J. W., B. A., Parsonage, Woodkirk, Leeds 
Hepworth, Rev. William, Botesdale 

Hepworth, Rev. William, Vicar of Griston, near Walton 
Hepworth, William, Esq., Calder Grove, Wakefield 
Herbert, Frederick, Esq., Northleach 

Herbert, Miss R., The Hill, near Abergavenny, Monmouthshire 
Herbert, Samuel, Esq., Gate Fulford, Yorkshire 
Herbert, The Honourable and Very Rev. W., Dean of Manchester 
[and Rector of Spofforth, Wetherby 

Herne, Rev. J. Buckworth, Rector of West Hendred, Berks 
Heriot, Rev. George, M.A., Incumbent of St. Anne's, Newcastle- 
Heseltine, Edward John, Esq., Bank, Rotherham [upon-Tyne 

Hesleden, Bryan, Esq., Solicitor, Barton-upon-Humber 
Hetherington, Joseph, Esq., Wallsend, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Hewetson, Joshua, Esq., J.P., Heckley House, Alnwick 
Hewett, John Waller, Esq., Fareham, Hants 
Hewison, Ions, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Hewison, Lawrence, Esq., Benwell Villa, do. 
Hewitt, Rev. William, M.A., Ancroft, Berwick-upon-Tweed 
Hext, Thomas, Esq., Reslormill, Lostwithiel, Cornwall 
Heywood, Arthur, Esq., Stanley Hall, Wakefield 
Heyworth, Rev. James, Shirley, near Southampton 
Hick, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Stokesley 
Hick, Samuel, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 
Hicks, Charles, Esq., Rye, Sussex 
Hicks, Thomas, Esq., Hastings, do. 

Higginson, Edmund, Esq., Saltmarsh, Bromyard, Herefordshire 
Higham, George, Esq., Solicitor, Hone Gate House, Biighouse 
Higinbothom, Newburgh, Esq., Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey 
Hilder, Thomas, Esq., Mays, Selmeston, near Lewes, Sussex 
Hill, John, Esq., Paulton, near Bath 

Hill, Rev. John, The Citadel, Hawkstone. near Shrewsbury 
Hill, Rev. J. Oakley, M.A., Dorton and Ashendon, Bucks 
Hill, John, Esq., South Cave, Kingston-upon-Hull 
Hill, John Hepworth, Esq., M.A., Cantab., Park Square, Leeds 
Hill, Rev. Melsup, B.A., Lye Parsonage, Stourbridge 
Hill, Richard, Esq., J.P., Thornton Dale, Pickering 
Hill, Captain William, Ryhope, Sunderland 
Hill, William Wilkes, Esq., Bteston Hall, Leeds 
HILL, The Right Honourable the late Lord 
HILL, The Right Honourable Lord 

Hinckley, Rev. John, Vicarage, Sheriff-Hales, near Shiffnall 
Hindle, William J., Esq., C.E., Barnsley 
Hindmarch, William, Esq., Poulter Close, Gateshead 
Hindmarsh, Luke, Esq., Alnbank House, Alnwick 
Hipperson, John, Esq., Carleton Rode, near Attleburgh 
Hippisley, Lady, Stone-Easton House, Old Down, Somerset 
Hird, Hnry Wickham, Esq., J.P., Low Moor House, Bradford 
Hitchcock, Mr. Harry, Chittern-All Saints, Htytesbury 
Hoare, Clement, Esq., Vineyard, Shirley, Southampton 
Hobson, Richard, Esq., M.D., Park House, Leeds 
Hocken, Rev. Wm., Rector of St. Endellion, Camelford, Cornwall 
Hodge, Rev. Edward, Woodfield-Badock, Penryn, Cornwall 
Hodge, George William, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Hodge, W.C., Esq., Pounds, Plymouth 

Hodgkinson, Rev. Edmund, M. A., Parsonage, Baildon, Bradford 
Hodgson, Alfred, Esq., Snaith, Yorkshire 
Hodgson, H. B., Esq., Acomb House, York 
Hodgson, Rev. John, M.A., M.R.S.L. Hartburn, Morpeth 
Hodgson, John, Esq., Bank Side, Hebden Bridge [Tweed 

Hodgson, Thomas, Esq., Morris Hall, Norham, Berwick-upon- 
Hodgson, Thomas Bent, Esq., Registrar for W.R., Skelton, York 
Hodgson, William, Esq., Solicitor, Staindrop, Darlington 
Hogge, Rev. Martin, Southacre. nearSwaffham 
Hoggett, Rev. Thomas A., Biddleston House, Rothbury 
Holdich, Rev. T. P., M.A., Oxon, St. John's, Carisbrooke 
Holding, William, Esq., Elm Grove, Kingsclere, Hants 
Holdsworth, J., Esq., belle-field, Wakefield 
Holford, George C., Esq., New Park, Devizes, Wilts 
Holgate, Rev. Thomas Burton, B.A., Vicar of Bishopton, Stock- 
Holland, John, jun., Esq., Slead House, Halifax [ton-upon-Tees 
Holland, Rev. S., D.D., Precentor of Cathedral, Chichester 
Holland, Rev. T. E. M., Rectory, Stoke Bliss, Tenbury 
Holland, Rev. T. A., M.A., Rector of Greatham, Petersfield 
Hollier, John, Esq., Thame, Oxon 

Hollingberry, T., Esq., Church House, Northiam, near Rye 
Hollingsworth, Rev. A. G. H., Vicar of Slow-Market 
Hollis, William, Esq., Shire Newton, near Chepstow 
Hollond, Robert, Esq., M.P., Allegria, St. Leonard's-on-Sea 
Holloway, Horatio, Esq., Marchwood Lodge, Southampton 
Holman, Captain Thomas Holloway, R.N., Great Grimsby 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



xix 



Holme, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Holme, Rev. James, M.A., Vicar of Kirk-Leatham, Guisborough 

Holmes, Rev. Henry, B.A., Incumbent of Stainfoith, Settle 

Holmes, Rev. Joseph, D.D., Head Master of the Grammar School, 

Holmes, Rev. J., Brooke Hall, near Norwich [Leeds 

Holmes, Rev. J. W., M.A., Stockton-on-the-Forest, York 

Holmes, Richaid, Fsq., Solicitor, Boroughbridge 

Holmes, Thomas, Esq., West Grove, Halifax 

Holmes, William, Esq., Brookfield, near Arundel, Sussex 

Holroyd, John, Esq., White Birks, Ovendon, Halifax 

Holroyde, James, jun., Esq., Cheapside, do. 

Holt, Henry, Esq., Mining Engineer, Wakefield 

Holy, Thomas Beaid, Esq., Norton House, Sheffield 

Hombersley, William, Esq., Peplow Hall, near Hodnet, Salop 

Home, R., Esq., Solicitor, Berwick-upon-Tweed 

HOME OFFICE, Her Majesty's 

Hook, Rev. Walter Farquhar, D.D., The Vicarage, Leeds 

Hooper, Rev. James, M.A., Rector of Kingweston, Somerset 

Hopkenson, John Joseph, Esq., Grimston Hill, York 

Hopkins, Rev. Adolplius, M.A., Vicar of Clent, Stourbridge 

Hopkins, Henry, Esq., Hubborne Lodge, Christchurch, Hants 

Hopper, Ralfh Shipperdson, Esq., M.D., East-Parade, Leeds 

Hopper, Thomas, Esq., Sharrow Lodge, Ripon 

Hopps, George, Esq., Red House, Yoik 

Horncastle, John, jun., Esq., The Yews, TickhiH 

Horndon, Rev. U., Bicton Parsonage, Devon 

Home, Rev. William, M.A., Rector of Hotham, Cave, Yorkshire 

Hornidge, Samuel Gwinnett, Esq., 10, Bloomsbury-square, London 

Horsfall, John Garnett, Esq., Bolton Royde, Bradford 

Horsfall, Rev. Richard, M.A., Rectory, Noimanby, Pickering 

Horton, John, Esq., Prior's Lee Hall, near Shiffnall, Salop 

Hoste, Derick, Esq., Barwick House, near Docking 

Hoste, Rev. James, Rector of Ingoldesthorpe, near Lynn 

Hotham, Rev. Charles, M.A., Rector of Roos, Patrington 

Hotham, Hon. and Rev. F., Rector of Dennington, Suffolk 

Houchen, John, Esq., Wereham Hall, near Stcke Ferry 

Houseman, John, Esq., M.D., M.R.C.S.L., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

How, Rev. G. A., Vicar of Bosham, near Chichester 

How, James, Esq., Brook House, Newport, Isle of Wight 

Howard, Rev. William, Great Witchingham Parsonage, Norfolk 

Howard, Hon. & Rev. William, M.A., The Grange, Rotherham 

Howard, Will am, Esq., Hartley House, Plymouth 

Howes, Rev. George, Spixworth Parsonage, Norwich 

Howey, Thomas, Esq., Lilburn Grange, Wooler 

Hoy, James Barlow, Esq., M.P., Thornhill, Southampton 

Hoyle, John Theodore, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Hoyle, Richard, Esq., Denton Hall, do. 

Hoyle, Robert C.,Esq., Aughton Hall, Sheffield 

Hoyle, William F., Esq., Solicitor, Rotherham 

Hubback, Robert Garcwell, Esq., Staindrop Hall, Darlington 

Hudson, Rev. G. T., West Harptree, Old Down, Somerset 

Hudson, Harrington, Esq., J.P., Bessingby, Bridlington 

Hudson, Rev. J ., M.A., Chatton, Belford 

Hudson, James, Esq., Adwalton, Leeds 

Hughes, Rev. D., M.A., Incumbent of Nether-Thong, Huddersfield 

Hughes, George Hughes, Esq., J.P., Middleton Hall, Wooler 

Hughes, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Incumbent of Meltham, Huddersfield 

Hughes, Thomas, Esq., Hylton Cottage, North Shields 

Hughes, William, Esq. .Browning's Grove, Framfield, near Uckfield 

Hughes, W. Hughes, Esq., F.S.A., &c. &c.,Bellevue House, Ryde 

Hughlirgs, Harry, Esq., Halifax 

Hull, Thomas, Esq., M.D., Beverley 

Hulme, John Rhodes, Esq., M.D., Scarborough 

Hulse, Sir Charles, Bart., Breamore House, Sarum 

Humble, E., Esq., Coldwell Cottage, Chesterfield 

Humble, George, Esq., Solicitor, Cleckheaton, Leeds 

Humble, Joseph John, Esq., Prudlioe House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Hume, Rev. Charles J., M.A., Rector of Meon-Stoke, Alton, Hants 

Hunt, Rev. George, Barningham Rectory, near Botesdale 

Hunt, John, Esq., Thornington, Coldstream 

Hunter, Adam, Esq., M.D., Park Place, Leeds 

Hunter, Cuthbeit, Esq., Walker Cottage, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Hunter, John, Esq., Solicitor, Gateshead 

Hunter, Sir Rich., Knt., Dunlany Cottage, Patching, near Arundel 

Huntriss, William, Esq., Lord Street, Halifax, Yorkshire 

Huntsman, Francis, Esq., Attercliffe, Sheffield 

Hurst, Robert Henry, M.P., Horsham, Sussex 

Hurst, William, Esq., Architect, Doncaster 

Hustler, John, Esq., Bolton House, Bradford 

Hutchinson, Rev. C. E., Can. Res. Chichester 

Hutchinson, George, Esq., Ovingham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Hutchinson, John, Esq., Caistor, Lincolnshire 

Hutchinson, Thomas, Esq., Brotton Hall, Guisborough 



Hutchinson, Timothy, Esq., Egglestone Hall, Barnard Castle 
Hutchinson, W r illiam, Esq., C.E., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Hutchinson, William Johnson, Esq., Grove, Barnard Castle 
Hutt, William, Esq., M.P., Gibfide, Gateshead 
Hutton, Rev. C. J., Rector of St. John's, Ilketshall, nearBungay 
Hutton, George, Esq., Carlton, Newark 
Hutton, John R., Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland 
Hutton, William, Esq., Esplanade, Tynemouth 
Hymers, William, Esq., J.P., Gateshead 
[bbotson, Rev. A., Incumbent of Rawdon, Leeds 
tkin, John Arthur, Esq., Scarcroft Grange, do. 
Illingworth, Jonathan Akioyd, Esq., Bradford 
Imeary, Robert, Esq., Jarrow Lodge, South Shields 
Inge, Rev. John Robt., M, A. .Incumbent of St. Mary's, Portsmouth 
[ngham, Joshua, Esq., M.A. & J.P., Blake Hall, ulirfield, Dews- 
Ingharn, T. Hastings, Esq., J.P., Marlon House, Skipton [bury 
ingham, William, Esq., Mankinholes, Todmorden 
Ingle, John Benjamin, Esq., Bradford 
Ingleby, Charles, Esq., Austwick, Settle 
Ingledew. Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Ingram, John R., Esq., Haugh End, Halifax 
Ingram, J. A., Esq., Codford St. Peter, Wilts 
Ingram, W. H., Esq., Ades, near Chailey, Lewes 
Ireland, Rev. John, Rockfield House, Nunney, near Frome 
Iremonger, Rev. F. A., B.A., Shipton-Bellinger Vicarage, Hants 
Iremonger, Rev. Thomas L., Vicar of Clatford, Goodworth, do. 
IRISH OFFICE, The, London 

Irvin, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Vicar of Ormesby, Stockton-upon-Tees 
Irving, George, Esq., Chichester, Sussex 

Irving, Rev. John W., B.A., Incumbent of Batley-Carr, Dewsbury 
Irving, Rev. Lewis H., Abercorn, Linlithgow 
Isham, Sir Justinian, Bart., Lamport Hall, Northampton 
Iveson, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Holmfirth 
Jackson, Charles, Esq., Banker, Doncaster 
Jackson, Rev. Charles, A.B., Bentley, Farnham 
Jackson, Edward, Esq., Beevor Hall, Barnsley 
Jackson, Rev. H., B.D., Holt Rectory, Norfolk 
Jackson, Hugh William, Esq., Leven, Beverley 
Jackson, John, Esq., Riston Grange, Beverley 
' Jackson, John, Esq., Beverley 

Jackson, Ralph Ward, Esq., Greatham Hall, Stockton- upon-Tees 
Jackson, Rev. T. G.,M.A., Studley, Warwickshire 
Jackson, William, Esq., Knottingley, Ferrybridge 
Jacob, Rev. Philip, M.A., Rector of Crawley, Hants 
Jadis, Rev. John, M.A., Vicar of Humbleton, Hedon, Hull 
James, C. F., Esq., Kirknewton House, Wooler 
James, Thomas, Esq., Brandon, Alnwick 
Jarratt, Rev. Robert, Wellington, Somerset 
Jarvis, Sir Raymond, Bart., Fair Oak Park, Bishopstoke, Hants 
Jarvis, L. W., Messrs, and Son, Lynn 
Jary, W. H., Esq., Blofield Lodge, Norwich 
Jeffcock, John, Esq., Cowley Manor, Sheffield 
Jeffcock, Thomas Dunn, Esq., Brush House, do. 
Jeffcock, William, Esq., High Hazles, Sheffield, Yorkshire 
Jefferson, Matthew, Esq., Lendings, Startforth, Barnard-Castle 
Jefferson, William, Esq., Pontefract 

Jefferys, Nath. Newman, Esq., Blighmont, Millbrook, Southampton 
Jeffrey, Rev. John, D.D., Rectory, Otterhampton, near Bridgwater 
Jenkins, Rev. David, M.A., Incumbent of Pudsey, Leeds 
Jenkins, Rev. William, Vicarage, Sidmouth, Devon 
Jenkins, Rev. William, Selham Rectory, near Midhurst, Sussex 
Jenkinson, Rev. F., Gnosall, Stafford 

Jenkinson, Rev. George, M.A., Lowick, Berwick-upon-Tweed 
Jenkinson, Rev. J. S., Hastings 

Jennings, Joseph Crew, Esq., Evershot, near Dorchester, Dorset 
Jerram, Rev. Charles, M.A., Rector of Witney, Oxon 
Jervoise, G. P., Esq., Herriard House, Hants 
Jesson, Thomas, Esq., Beech House, Bransgore, Christchurch 
Jessop, Adam, Esq., Castleford, Pontefract 
Jessop, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Bilton Hall, York 
Jissett, Robert, Esq., Blackdown, Winchester, Hants 
Joberns, William Southwell, Esq., Ryde, Isle of Wight 
Jobling, Jn. Creswell, Esq., Newton Hall, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Jobson, William, Esq., Boulmer House, Alnwick 
Jodrell, Rev. Henry, B.A., Idsworth, Horndean, Hants 
Johnson,. G., Esq., Benwell Colliery, Newcastle-npon-Tyne 
Jffhnson, Captain James, Willow Bank, near Ryde 
Johnson, John, Esq., Willington, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Johnson, John, Esq., Brigham, Driffield 
Johnson, Rev. R. L., Biuderton House, near Chichester 
Johnson, Samuel, Esq., Halifax 
Johnson, Rev. Samuel, Hinton-Blewett, near Bath 
Johnson, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Hinton-Ampner,.Alresford 

bi 



XX 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Johnson, Thomas, Esq., Doncaster 

Johnston, William, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Johnstone, Sir John V. B., Bart., M.P., Hackness, Scarborough 

Johnstone, Spearman, Esq., Mount Villa, York 

Johnstone, Rev. Thomas Bryan, Rector of Glutton, Somerset 

Jolliffe, John Twyford, Esq., AmmerdownPark, Kilmersdon, do. 

Jones, Frederick Robert, Esq., Birk House, Huddersfield 

Jones, F.R., jun., Esq., Solicitor, do. 

Jones, George Haines, jun., Esq., M.D., Ashling House, Hants 

Jones, Rev. John, St. Owen-street, Hereford 

Jones, Rev. John, All Souls, St. Leonard's, Sussex 

Jones, J. A., Esq., Llanarth Court, Abergavenny 

Jones, Rev. Robert, M.A., Vicar of Branxton, Coldstream 

Jones, Thomas, Esq., Olive House, near Dudley 

Jones, Thomas Rock Smith, Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland 

Jones, Rev. W., M.A., Rector of Morestead, Winchester 

Jope, William, Esq., Tremeddan, Liskeard, Cornwall 

Jordan, John, Esq., Whitchurch, Hants 

Jowett, Thomsis, Esq., Bingley 

Jubb, Abraham, Esq., Halifax 

Justice, Henry, Esq., Hinstock, near Market-Drayton, Salop 

Keeling, Rev. F., M.A., Pockthorpe Hall, Driffiefd 

Keete, 'Henry W., Esq., M.D., St. Nicholas, Newport, Isle of Wight 

Keir, John Mallison, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 

Kekwick, John, Esq., The Holmes, Rotherham 

Kelk, John, Esq., M.D., Scarborough 

Kelsall, James, Esq., Bridge House, Ferrybridge 

Kemp, F. T., Esq., Swardeston, near Norwich 

Kemp, Nathaniel, Esq., Ovingdean House, near Brighton 

Kemp, Rev. T. Cooke, B.A., Vicar of East Meon, Hants 

Kemp, Rev. Sir W. R., Bart., Gissingr, near Diss, Norfolk 

Kempson, Rev. W. Brooke, A.M., Rector of Stoke-Lacy, Hereford 

Kendall, James, Esq., Solicitor, Pickering 

Kendall, John, Esq., East Ness, Whitwell 

Kenmir, George Johnson, Esq., Claremont House, Gateshead 

Kennaway, Sir John, Bart., Escot House, Honiton, Devon 

Kennaway, Mark, Esq., Exeter, Devon 

Kennedy, Rev. Lewis Drummond, B.A., Louth 

Kennicott, Rev. Richard Dutton, B.A., Horton, Morpeth 

Kent, Rev. Geo. E. East Winch Hall, near Lynn 

Keppel, Hon. Major-Gen. G., Ashley. Lymington, Hants 

Keppel, Hon. and Rev. T. R., Warham Rectory, near Wells 

Kerrison, M., Esq., Ranworth, near Acle, Norfolk 

Kett, George S., Esq., Brooke House, near Norwich 

Kidd, Martin, Esq., Solicitor, Holmfirth 

Kidd, Rev. Thomas, Croxton Rectory, near St. Neot's 

Kilby, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Incumbent of St. John's, Wakefield 

Kilner, Rev. William, D.D., Rector of Weyhill, Hants 

King, Rev. Henry, M.A., Middleton, Beverley 

King, Rev. John, M.A., Incumbent of Christ Church, Hull 

King, John, Esq., Loxwood House, near Horsham, Sussex 

King, J. Esq., Coates, nearPetworth 

King, R. Meade King, Esq., Walford, near Taunton 

King, Thomas, Esq., Kirkleatham, Guisborough 

Kinneir, Richard, Esq., M.D., Cirencester 

Kinsman, Rev. A.G., M.A., Incumbent of Gildersome, Leeds 

Kipling, Thomas, Esq., Barnard-Castle, Durham 

Kirlew, George, Esq., The Mount, York 

Kirsopp, William, Esq., Solicitor, Hexham 

Knatchbull, W r illiam F., Esq., Babington, Frome 

Knight, Sir Arnold James, Knt., 31. D. 

Knight, Rev. C. Bridges, M.A., Chawton Rectory, Alton, Hants 

Knight, Messrs. Charles and John, Cannington, Bridgwater 

Knight, Rev. John, Perpetual Curate of Heytesbury, Wilts 

Knigot, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Rectorof Ford, Coldstream 

Knight, Thomas, Esq., Alton, Hants 

Knighton, Sir William W., Bart., Blendworth Cottage, Horndean 

Knipe, Rev. R. R., Rectorof Water-Newton, Wansford, Hunts 

Knott, Samuel, Esq., M.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Knowles & Brown, Messrs., Iron- Works, Rotherham 

Knowles, George, Esq., Wood End, Scarborough 

Knowles, L. & L. H., Messrs., Gomersall, Leeds 

Knowlys, John, Esq., Woodsfarm Lodge, near Crawley, Sussex 

Lacy, Thomas, Esq., Wood Dalling Hall, near Reepham 

Ladbroke, James Willis, Esq., Hillyer's, Petworth, Sussex 

Laidman, John, Esq., Exeter 

Laing, George, Esq., Balerno Mill, Currie, Edinburgh 

Laing, Philip, Esq., Deptford House, Sunderland 

Lamb, Sir C. M. Bart., Beauport, near Battle 

Lamb, Henry, Esq., The Rookery, Hawley, Kent 

Lamb, Henry, Esq., Kettering 

Lamb, John, Esq., Solicitor, Barnard-Castle 

Lamb, Thomas, Esq., Andover 



Lambert, Rev. Burgess, M.A., Misterton, Crewkerne, Somerset 

Lambert, Rev. Johnson, M.A., Bowes, Barnard-Castle 

Lambert, J., Esq., Solicitor, Alnwick 

Lampard, Goodeve, and Bowker, Messrs., Winchester 

Lance, Rev. William, A.M., Rector of Faccombe, Hants 

Landon, Rev. James, B.D., Vicar of Aberford, Wetherby 

Langham, Sir James Hay, Bart., Glyndbourn, near Lewes, Sussex 

Langley, Rev. John, A.M., All Saints, Southampton 

Langridge, W. V., Esq., Lewes, Sussex 

LangstaflT, Owen, Esq., Barnard- Castle 

Lardner, J. H., Esq., Rye, Sussex. 

Larke, H. R., Esq., Brooke, near Norwich 

Latham, Rev. Henry, Selmeston Vicarage, near Lewes 

Lauga, Burman, Esq., Waltham, Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire 

Lawrell, Rev. John, B.A., Dummer Rectory, Basingstoke 

Lawrence, Captain J. R., East Harptree, Old Down, Somerset 

Lawson, William, Esq., Longhirst, Morpeth 

Lawton, G. Warner, Esq., Eye, Suffolk 

Layborn, Jonathan, Esq.. Wold Cottage, Thwing, Bridlington 

Laybourn, Jacob, Esq., Nafferton Lodge, Driffield 

Laycock, Thomas, Esq., Fishergate House, York 

Leach, Rev. John, M.A., Tweedmouth, Berwick 

Leadbeatter, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Leah, Henry, Esq., J.P., Byerley Hall, Bradford 

Leake, James, Esq., Witney, Oxon 

Leatham, William, Esq., beech Lawn, Heath, Wakefield 

Leather, James, Esq., Beeston Park, Leeds 

Leather, John Towlerton, Esq., C.E., Dam House, Sheffield 

Leaver, F., Esq., Nottingham 

Ledgard, Francis, Esq., Solicitor, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Lee, George, Esq., Threapwood, Hexham 

Lee, James, Esq., West Retford House, Notts 

Lee, R. T., Esq., Grove Hall, Ferrybridge 

Lee, Thomas M., Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Lee, William, Esq., St. John's, Wakefield 

Lee, W'illiam, Esq., Huddersfield 

Leech, Rev. W., M.A., Vicar of Shernborne, near Lynn 

Leeds, Stephen, Esq., Whitwell, Reepham 

I.eeke, Rev. R. H., Brockton, Newport, Salop 

Leeke, R. M., Esq., Longford Hall, do. 

Lefevre, The Right Hon. C. S., Speaker of the House of Commons 

Le Grice, Rev. Frederick, M.A., Vicar of Great Gransden, Hunts 

Leeman, George, Esq., Solicitor, York 

Legard, George, Esq., J.P., Fangfoss Hall, Pocklington 

Legard, Sir Thomas Digby, Bart., Ganton Hall, Yorkshire [ham 

Legge, John Robinson, Esq., Solicitor, Houghton-le-Spring, Dur- 

LKICESTER, The Right Honourable the late Earl of 

Leigh, Frederick, Esq., Collumpton, Devon 

Leigh, Robert, Esq., Taunton 

Leigh, Rev. Win., M.A., Rector of Pulham-St. Mary, Harleston 

Leman, Rev. G.O., Perpetual Curate of Stoven, Brampton Hall 

Leman, Rev. Thomas Orgill, Rector of Brampton, near Halesworth 

Lempriere, Captain G. Ourry, R.N., Pelham Lodge, Alton, Hants 

LENNOX, The Right Honourable Lord George 

Lenthall, Kyffin John W., Esq., Bessels-Leigh, Abingdon, Berks 

Leslie, Rev. C. W., St. Leonard's, Sussex 

Lethbridge, Rev. Charles, St. Stephen's, Launceston 

Lewes, John, Esq., Lewes, Sussex 

Lewin, R. Hutchinson, Esq., Bartley Lodge, Southampton 

Lewis, Rev. J. B., Kingsbury-Episcopi, near South Petherton 

Lewthwaite, Rev. George, B.D., Rector of Adel, Leeds 

Lichfield, William, Esq., Nursling Mount, Southampton 

Lidbeiter, Richard, Esq., Magdalen, near Steyning, Sussex. 

Liddell, Christopher, sen., Esq., Shieldfield, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Liddell, Rev. Henry George, M.A., Rector of Easington, Durham 

Light, Rev. H. W. M., B. A., Incumbent of Bramshaw, Hants 

Lind, James, Esq., M.D., Ryde, Isle of Wight 

Lingwood, Robert M. Esq., Sufton Court, Hereford 

Linskill, Rev. John A. P., B.A., Stanhope, Durham 

Lipscomb, Rev. Francis, M.A., Rector of W r elbury-in-CleveIand 

Lister & Son, Messrs. Robert, Scotswood, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Lister, Francis, Esq., Bank, Goole 

Lister, George S. Spofforth, Esq., Ousefleet Grange, Goole 

Lister, George Thompson, Esq., Hollin Close, Bollon 

Lister, Rev. John, M.A., Incumbent of Stanley, Wakefield 

Lister, John, jun., Esq., Gateshead 

Lister, John, Esq., Elmfield, Bramley, Leeds 

Lister, Rev. J. M., Burwell Park, Louth, Lincoln 

Lister, Rev. Joseph Martin, B.A., Muckton-cum-Burwell, Louth 

Lister, Samuel Cuncliffe, Esq., Manningham Hall, Bradford 

Little, Rev. Robert, B.D.,Yarmouth, Isle of Wight 

Littler, Rev. John, Battle, Sussex [end, Glamorgan, South Wales 

Llewelyn, Rev. R. Pendrill, M.A., Llangynwyd Vicarage, Bridg- 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



xxi 



Lloyd, George, Esq., Stockton Hall, York 
Lloyd, Rev. Henry, M.A., Stockton Hall, do. 
Lloyd, Sir James M., Bart., Lancing, near Shoreham, Sussex 
Lloyd, Rev. William, Rushall, near Pewsey, Wilts 
Lloyd, Rev. W. H. C., Norbury, Rectory, Newport, Staffordshire 
Lloyd, Rev. Yarburgh G., M.A., Incumbent of Rawcliffe, Selby 
Locke, Wadham, Esq., Codford-St. Mary's, Wiley, Wilts 
Lockwood, Rev. J. W. Knollys, B.A., Incumbent of Ulrome, 
Long, Frederick, Esq., Shabbington, Bucks [Bridlington 

Long, Francis Stephen, Esq., Red House, Amesbury, Wilts 
Long, Rev. Henry, Newton Rectory, near Long Stratton 
Long.'R. Kellett, Esq., Dunston Hall, near Norwich 
Long, S. M. Esq. Bodney Hall, near Brandon 
Long, Walter, Esq., M.P., Rood Ashton House, Trowbridge 
Longlands, Rev. T., M.A., Vicar of Porchester, Hants 
Longridge, William, Esq., Bedlington Iron-Works, Morpeth 
Longstaff, Owen, Esq., Barnard-Castle 
LONSDALE, The Right Honourable the late Earl of 
Lonsdale, J. W., Esq., Solicitor, Halifax 
Lopes, Sir Ralph, Bart.,Maristow, near Plymouth 
Loraine, R. G., Esq., Wallington, Surrey 
Lord, Rev. W. E., Rector of Northiam, near Rye, Sussex 
Lovegrove, Joseph, Esq., Horsham, Sussex 
Lovett, James, Esq., Priory, Cricklade, Wilts 
Lowes, John, Esq., Aliens Green, Haltwhistle 
Lowrey, William, Esq., Barmoor, Berwick-upon-Tweed 
Lowry, Stephen, Esq., Shieldfield House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Lucas, Rev. St. John W., Rector of East Hatley 
Ludlow, H. G. G., Esq., Heywood House, Westbury, Wilts 
Lukin, Rev. John, A.M., Rector of Nursling, Hants 
Lumb, Henry, Esq., Southgate, Wakefield 
Lumb, Rev. Thomas Dawson, M.A., Methley, Leeds 
Lundy, Rev. Francis, M.A., Rector of Lockington, Beverley 
Lupton, Harry, Esq., Thame, Oxon 
Luttrell, Rev. A. Lownes, East Quantoxhead, Bridgwater 
Luxmore, Edward, Esq.,Wadebridge, Cornwall 
Luxford, Rev. G. C. Bognor, Sussex 
Lyddon, Richard, Esq., Wellington, Somerset 
Lyddon, Robert, Esq., South Petherton, Somerset 
Lyne, Rev. C. P., Rector of West Thorney, near Chichester 
Lyne, Edward, Esq., Wadebridge, Cornwall 
Lyne, John, Esq., Moorswater Lodge, near Liskeard 
Lynn, F. P., Esq., Mindrum Mill, Coldstream 
Lyon, David, Esq., Northbrook, Goring, near Worthing 
Lyon, James, Esq., Dangstone, near Midhurst 
Lyus, George, Esq., Stow Market 

Mabbott, W. C. Esq., The Priory, Southover, near Lewes 
Macauley, Francis Edwin, Esq., Solicitor, l:alifax 
-Mac-Carty, Charles E., Esq., Branch Bank of England, Leeds 
Machell, Rev. Robert, M.A., Etton, Beverley 
Mack, Rev. W. B., Rector of Horham, Stradbroke 
MACKENZIE, The Right Honourable Lord 
Mackenzie, Alexander, Esq., Doorhay Cottage, Porlock, Somerset 
Mackenzie, Rev. William, B.A., Easington, Durham 
Macpherson, Rev. A., Rothwell Vicarage, Kettering 
Maddison, George P., Esq., Cramlington, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Maddison, Rev. John G., A.M., West Monkton, Taunton 
Magor, John P., Esq., Penventon, Redruth, Cornwall 
Maister, Rev. H., B.A., Thornaby, Stockton-upon-Tees 
Major, H., Esq., Simonside Hall, J arrow, Gateshead 
Maker, Rev. J. W., Patron and Incumbent of Brcde, near Hastings 
Malcolm, J., Esq., Lamorbey, Bexley, and Gt. Stanhope St., London 
Maling, Rear Admiral, The Elms, Abberley, Worcester 
Maling, Edward Haygorth, Esq., Sunderland 
Mallows, George, Esq., Wattisfield, near Ixworth 
MALMESBURY, The Right Honourable the Earl of 
Maltby, Rev. Henry Joseph, M.A., Rector of Eaglescliffe, Yarm 
Mann, Rev. Charles, Denver, East Hall, near Downham-Market 
Mann, Rev. Joseph, M. \., Vicar of Kellington, Ferrybridge 
Mann, Joshua, Esq., Mannville, Bradford 
Manser, David, Esq., Rye, Sussex 
Mant, Arthur, Esq., Storringtoa, do. 

Mant, Thomas, Esq., M.D., Truro Cottage, Hayling, Hants 
Manx, Mrs. Martha, Shalden Lodge, Alton, do. 

Marchant, F.ancs, Esq., M.D., Hemsworth, Pontefract 
Margitson, J. T., Esq., Ditchingham House, near Bungay 
Marley, John, Esq., High Claremont Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Marriott, John Gary, Esq., Narborough, near Swaffham 
Marriott, Mr., Taunton, Somerset 
Marris, George, Esq., Solicitor, Caistor 
Marsden, Rev. A., M.A., Vicar of Gargrave, Skipton 
Marsden, John, Esq., Solicitor, Wakefield 
Marsh, Henry, Esq., Hatherdon House, Andover 



Marsh, Rev. W. H., jun., Esq., Lamas Rectory, near Coltishall 

Marshall, H. Cowper, Esq., Westwood Hall, Leeds 

Marshall, James Garth, Esq., Headingley, do. 

Marshall, John, Esq., Lane Ends, Horsforth, do. 

Marshall, Joseph, Esq., Street House, near Bradford 

Marshall, Rev. J. W. H., Rector of Ovingdean, near Brighton 

Marshall, Michael, Esq., Chew-Magna, near Bristol 

Marshall, Richard, Esq., Hornsea House, Yorkshire 

Marshall, R., Esq., Higham Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Marshall & Son, Messrs., Spring Mill, Huddersfield 

Marshall, William, Esq., Treworgey, near Liskeard, Cornwall 

Marshall, Rev. W., Vicar of Naseby, near Welford 

Marter, Rev. Richard, A.M., Millbrook, Southampton 

Martin, Charles W., Esq., Belvedere, Christchurch, Hants 

Martin, James, Esq., Gate-Helmsley 

Martin, J. A., Esq., Sidbrook, West Monkton, Taunton 

Martin, Sir Roger, Bart., Burnham Hall, Burnham-Market 

Martin, Thomas, Esq., Havant, Hants 

Martin, T. J., Esq., Pulborough, near Petworth, Sussex 

Martin, William, Esq., Bixley Hall, near Norwich 

Martin, William, Esq., Hemingstone Hall, near Needham-Maiket 

Martin, W. Benne, Esq., Worsborough Hall, Barnsley 

Martineau, Rev. A., M.A., Vicar of Whitkirk, Leeds 

Martinson, Edward, Esq., High Hedgefield, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Martyn, Richard W. Esq., Martock, Somerset 

Martyn, Rev. Thomas W addon, Lifton Rectory, near Launceston 

Mason, Captain H. Browne, R.N., Hilfield, Yately, Hants 

Mason, Rev. Jacob Montague, M. A., Scarborough 

Mason, Mathias, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 

Mason, Colonel William, Necton Hall, near Swaffham 

Massey, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Hatcliffe Rectory, Great Grimsby 

Massie, Rev. C., Great Finborough, near Stowmarket 

Mather, Edward, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Mathew, J. Mee, Esq., F.S. A. .Churchyard Court, Temple, London 

Matthews, Rev. John Jenkins, Rector of Melbury-Osmond 

Matthews, Rev. Thomas, B.A.. Rector of Bentworth, Alton, Hants 

Mdton, James, Esq., Manor House, Maddington, Devizes 

Matravers, William, Esq., Westbury, Wilts 

Maud, Abraham, Esq., Fleets Rilston, Skipton 

Maude, Arthur, Esq., Goole 

Maude, Francis, Esq., J.P., Alverthorpe Hall, Wakefield 

Maude, Rev. Francis, M.A., Incumbent of Hoyland, Barnsley 

Maude, John, Esq., Dep. Lieut., & J. P., Moor House, Stanley, 

Maude, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Elvington, Yorkshire [Wakefield 

Maugham, Rev. William, Incumbent of Benwell, Newcastle-upon- 

Maule, George Frederick, Esq., Huntingdon [Tyne 

Maunsell, Thomas P. Esq., M.P., Thorpe Malsor, Kettering 

Maxse, James, Esq., Woolbeding, near Midhurst, Sussex 

Maxwell, William Constable, Esq., Everingham Park, Pocklington 

May, Thomas," Esq., Basingstoke 

Mayo, Rev. Charles Erskine, M.A., Dalby Rectory, Stillingtoa 

Me Calmont, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Highfield, Southampton 

Me Carogher, Dr., Chichester 

Me Ghie, Rev. J. Powlett, A.M., Oxon, Vicar of Portsmouth 

Me Kinley, George, Rear-Admiral of the Red, Anglesea Villa 

Me Michael, George, Esq., Bridgenorth 

Meade, P. Esq., North Curry, near Taunton 

Meakin, Mr. John, Brockton, Newport, Salop 

Measure, John, Esq. .Lincoln's Inn, London 

Medhurst, Messrs., Hurstbourne-Tarrant, Andover 

Medlycott, Sir William Coles, Bart., Ven House, Milborne Port 

Meek, Alderman James, Middlethorpe Lodge, York 

Meers, Thomas Gay, Esq., Bale, near Holt, Norfolk 

Meiklam, John, Esq., R.Y.S., Cowes, Isle of Wight 

Mellor, Benjamin, Esq., Stainland, Halifax 

Melmoth and Son, Messrs. .Sherborne, Dorset 

Mence, Rev. J. W., B.A., Prestwold, Loughborough 

Mence, William Cookes, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 

Mercer, Rev. William, M.A., Incumbent of St. George's, Sheffield 

Merest, Rev. J. W. Drage, B.D., Vicar of Staindrop, Durham 

Merriman, James, Esq., Ashford House, Cannington, Bridgwater 

Meryon, John, Esq., Rye, Sussex 

Messiter, Messrs. G. and H., Wincanton, Somerset 

Metcalfe, George, Esq , Northumberland Square, North Shields 

Metcalfe, Thomas, Esq., West Boldon Hall, Gateshead 

Mewbuin, Thomas M., Esq., Solicitor, Darlington 

Meynell, George, Esq., Barrister at Law, York 

Meyer, Philip Herman, Esq., Stondon Place, Ongar 

Michell, Rev. H. C., M.A., Minister of Lymington, Hants 

Michell, J. C., Esq., East Street, Brighton 

Micklethwait, Rev. John Heaton, B.A., Denton, Otley 

Micklethwaite, Daniel, Esq., South Parade, Wakefield 

Micklethwaite, John, Esq., Ardsley House, Barnsley 



XX11 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Micklethwait, Nathaniel, Esq., Taverham, Norwich 

Middleton, Rev. F. G., M.A., Perpetual Curate of Bembridge 

Middleton, Peter, Esq., Stockeld Park, VVetherby 

Middleton, Sir W. F. F., Bart., Shrubland Park, near Ipswich 

MIDDLETON, The Right Honourable Lord 

Middleton, William, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Midgley, Rev. Edward James, B^A., Medomsley, Gateshead 

Mildmay, Lady, Dogmersfield Park, Hants 

Jlillei, Miss, Anstey House, Alton, Hants 

Miller, James, Esq., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Milles, W.H., Esq., Filleigh, Chudleigh, Devon 

Millett, Charles, Esq., Hill Place, Droxford, Hants 

Millett, John, N. R., Esq., Penzance 

Millett, Richard, Esq., Penzanee 

Milligan, Robert, Esq., Harden, Bingley 

Milligan, Robert, Esq., Acacia, Rawdon, Leeds 

Millington, Robert, Esq., Ordsall House, Retford 

Mills, John, Jun., Esq., Brandeston Hall, near Framlingbam 

Mills, Stephen, Esq., Elston House, Orcheston St. George, Wilts 

Milne, James, Esq., Hay Park, Polmont, Falkirk. N.B. 

Milne, Rev. John, M.A., Vice-Principal of the College, Huddeis- 

Milne, Thomas, Esq., VV'arley House, Halifax 

Milner, John C.., Esq., Thurlstone, Barnsley 

Milnthorpe, Thomas, Esq., High Harrogate 

Minster, Rev. Thomas, B.A., Woodsome Hall, Huddersiield 

Milverton, Miss, Ford Abbey, Thorncombe, Devon 

Milward, George, Esq., Manor House, Lechlade, Gloucester 

Mitchell, Eli, Esq., Solicitor, Ossett, Wakefield 

Mitchell, Joseph, Esq., Architect, Sheffield 

Mitchell, J., Esq., Wymondham 

Mitchell, Rev. Walter, B.A., Attercliffe, Sheffield 

Mitchell, W.,Esq., Petersfield, Hants 

Mitford, Captain Robert, R. N., Hunmanby Hall, Yorkshire 

Mitton, Michael & Son, Messrs., Solicitors, Pontefract 

Moffat, Andrew Ker, Esq., Beanley, Alnwick 

Moftatt, William Lambric, Esq., Architect, Doncaster 

Mogg, Rev. H. H., M.A., Stone-Easton, Old Down, Somerset 

Mogg, John Geo.,Esq., Manor House, Farrington-Gurney, do. 

Mogg, William Rees, Esq., Cholwell House, near Bath 

Molesworth, Rev. Hender, Falmouth, Cornwall 

Molesworth, Sir Wm., Bart., M.P., Pencarrow, Bodmin, Cornwall 

Monck, Charles Atticus, Esq., J.P., Humshaugh House, Ilexham 

Monks, George, Esq., Arundel, Sussex 

Moor, Rev. J. H. C., Clilton, near Rugby 

Moore, Francis George, Esq., M.R.C.S.L., Rotherham 

Moore, Samuel, Esq., Nottingham 

Moore, Thomas, Esq., Architect, Sunderland 

Moore, T. S., Esq., Warham All Saints, near Wells 

Moore, William, Esq., Wychdon Lodge, Rugeley, Staffordshire 

Moorhouse, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Halifax 

Moorhouse, William, Esq. .Marine Villa, Knottingley, Ferrybridge 

Moorman, Josiah, Esq., BexhilJ, near St. Leonard's, Sussex 

Mordey, William, Esq., Surgeon, Bishop-Wearmouth 

More, Eev. Robert H. Gayer, Larden Hall, near Wenlock, Salop 

Morehead, Rev. George Jeffery, Easington-cum-Liverton, Gisbo- 

Morehouse, Sidney, Esq., Morecrcft, Holmfirth [rough 

Morey, John Egleton, Esq., Doneaster 

Morfitt, John, Esq., Upper Bank House, Horsforth, Leeds [Hants 

Morgan, Heniy Mannington, Esq., Houghton Lodge, Stockbridge, 

Morgan, Rev. Thomas, Vicarof Dingestow-with-Tregare, .M oninou th 

Morgan, Wm., Esq., Woodovis, near Tavistock, Devon 

Morphew, Rev. T. C., Terrington, near Lynn 

Morrice, Rev. William D., B.A., Leeds 

Morris, E., Esq., High St. Cliff, Lewes 

Morris, Rev. George, M.A., Salisbury, Southampton 

Morris, Joseph, Esq., Greenside, Allerton, Bradford 

Morris, Rev. L. S., M.A., Rector of Thornton, Skipton 

Morris, W. E., Esq., Churwell, Leeds 

Morrish, Joseph, Esq., Greenside, Allerton, Bradford 

Morse, George, Esq., Catton Park, near Norwich 

Mortimer, John, Esq., Sen. Surgeon of Haslar Hospital, Gosport 

Mortlock, II., Esq., Caxton, Cambridgeshire 

Moss, J. C., Esq., Kempston Lodge, near Swaffham 

Mountain, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Beighton Villa, Sheffield 

MOUNT SANDFORD, The Right Honourable Lord, 

Moxon, Rev. J. B., Rector of Sandringham, near Lynn [shire 

Moxon, Rev. William Charles, M.A., Wintringham, Brigg, Lincoln- 

Muir, Alexander, Esq., Bradford 

Mules, Charles Hawkes, Esq., M.D., Ilminster, Somerset 

Mundy, Charles J. H., Esq., Mavis-Enderby, Spilsby 

Murgatioyd, William, Esq., Birks House, Bradford 

Murrell, Gibbs, Esq., Lesingham House, Surlinghum, near Norwich 

Musgrave, Simeon, Esq., Kirkstall, Leeds 



Muskett, H., Esq., Clippesby House, near Acle 

Muskett, J, S., Esq., lutwood Hall, near Norwich 

Musters, Rev. W. M., Colwick Rectory, Nottingham 

Mytton, H. G., Esq., Cleobury North, Bridgenorth 

Nairn, Philip, Esq., Waren House, Belford 

Nanney, Rev. Hugh, B.A.. Jarrow Parsonage, Gateshead 

Napper, Edward, Esq., Ifold, near Petworth, Sussex 

Naylor, Rev. Martin Joseph, D.D., Rector of Crofton, Wakeneld 

N.eill, John, Esq., Manager of the Union Bank, Wakefield 

Nell, David William, Esq., Leeds 

Nelson, George Brooke, Esq,, do. 

Nepean, Rev. Evan, Heydon Rectory, near Reepham 

Ness, John, Esq., Helmsley 

Netherwood, William, Esq., Skipton 

Nevill, The Hon. and Rev. C., Vicarage, East Grinstead, Sussex 

Nevio, Rev. Thomas, M. A,, Battyeford, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Newbery, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Incumbent of Shipley-cum-Heaton, 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, District Bank of [Bradford 

Newington, Charles, Esq., Highlands, Ticehurst, Sussex 

Newland, Major R. B., Midhurst 

Newlove, Rev. R., M.A., Vicar of Thorner, Leeds 

Newman, Edward, Esq., Creech Place, Southwick, Hants 

Newman, Edward, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 

Newman, Edwin, Esq., Yeovil, Somersetshire 

Newman, Rev. W. J.,, B.A., Tankersley, Barnsley 

Newnham, Rev. G. W., Chilcompton, Old Down, Somerset 

Newsam, Rev, James, M.A., MiildJeshorough 

Newton, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, York 

Newton, Isaac, Esq., Knaresbonough 

Newton, Rev, J. Farmer, B.A., Kirby-eum-Broughton, Stokesley 

Newton, Samuel, Esq., Croxton Park, Cambridgeshire 

Newton, William, Esq,., East Retford, Notts 

Niblet, J,. D. Thomas, Esq., Haresfield, near Gloucester 

Nicholetts, John, Esq., South Petherton, Somerset 

Nicholls, Samuel, jun., Esq., Bridgenorth, Salop 

Nicholls, Thomas, Esq., Axbridge, Somerset 

Nicholson, Edward, Esq., Solicitor, Doneaster 

Nicholson, George K., Esq., Ravensdowne, Berwiek-upon-Tweed 

Nicholson, Rev. Henry, Gjrafton-Underwood, Kettering 

Nicholson & Hett, Messrs., Solicitors, Brigg [bridge, Halifax 

Nicholson, Rev. P. C., M.A., Incumbent of St. James', Hebden- 

Nicholson, Captain Ralph, Thornton Park, Berwick-upon-Tweed 

Nicholson, Robert, Esq., M.I.C.E., Newcastle upon-Tyne 

Nicholson, Robert, Esq., Bradford, Yorkshire 

Nicholson, Stephen, Esq., Roundhay Park, Leeds 

Nickols, Riehard, Esq., Barnsley 

Nisbett,Marsden,&Co., Messrs., Chapel-town Iron- Works, Sheffield 

Noakes, William, Esq., Ticehurst, Sussex 

NORFOLK, His Grace the Duke of 

Norris, Charles, Esq., St. John's House, Halifax 

Norris, Rev. Fred., Rector of Gransden Parva, Caxton 

Norris, Rev. George Poole, Roseraddock House, Liskeard 

Norris, James Edward, Esq., Savile Hall, Halifax 

NORTHUMBERLAND, His Grace the Duke of 

NORWICH, The Right Honourable the Lord Bishop of 

Nottingham Subscription Library 

Nowell, James, Esq., Quarry Hill House, Dewsbury 

Noyes, H. Crine, Esq., Beaulieu, Hants 

Gates, Henry, Esq., Spring House, Heckmondwike 

Ogle, Rev. Edward C., M.A., Vicar of Bedlington, Morpeth 

Ogle, Rev. Wro. Reynolds, Meesom Hall, Wellington, Shropshire 

Ogel, Rev. J. S., M.A., Preb. Durham, Kirkley Hall, Newcastle 

OJdershaw, The Ven. John, Archdeacon of Norfolk 

Oldroyd, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Dewsbury 

Olive, Rev. John, Vicar of Hillingley, near Hailsham 

Oliver, George C., Esq., Bramdean Cottage, Ahesford 

Oliver, Royston, Esq., Stansfield, Todmorden 

Oliver, Thomas, Esq., Steepleton House, Blandford 

Oliver, William, Esq., Walbottle Colliery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Olivier, Rev. D. J., Rector of Clifton, Biggleswade 

Olliver, William, Esq., Courtlands, near Worthing 

Ommanney, Rear-Adml. Sir J. A., K.C.B., Warblington, Havant 

ONGLEY, The Right Honourable Lord 

Onslow, Hon. Col. Crawley, Upton House, Old Alresford, Hants 

Ord, Charles O., Esq., Solicitor, Stockton-upon-Tees 

Ord, William, Esq., M.P., V\ hitneld Hall, Northumberland 

Ojde, Charles W., Esq., Nunnykirk, Morpeth 

ORDNANCE, Her Majesty's Honourable Board of 

Orger, Rev. William, M.A., Incumbent of Shirley, Southampton 

Ornsby, Henry W., Esq., Solicitor, Dailingtou 

Orven, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Worksop," Notts 

Osborne, Rev. Edward, M.A., Hook Cottage, Horndean, Hants 

Osborne, Rev. George, M.A., Stainby, Colstersworth 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



XXlll 



Ostler and Sons, Messrs., Grantham 

Otter, Rev. W. Bruere, Vicar of Cowfold, near Horsham, Sussex 
Overend, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Kirkburton, Huddersfield 
Overend, Wilson, Esq., J. P., Sheffield 

Overman, J. R., Esq., Burnham-Sulton, near Burnham-Westgate 
Overton, Rev. C., Cottingham, Kingston-upon-Hull 
Overton, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, York 
Owen, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Worksop 
Owston, Robert, Esq., Solicitor, Brigg, Lincolnshire 
Oxley, George, E.sq., Park Place, Bradford 
Oxley, -John, Esq., Moorgate, Rotherham 
Oxley, John Fox, Esq., Askerne, Yorkshire 
Oxtoby, W. Christopher, Esq., New Road, Driffield 
Paddon, John, Esq., Fareham, Hants 
Padwick, William, Esq., Manor House, Hayling, Hants 
Pagan, Rev. Samuel, M.A., Stanningley, Leeds 
Page, C.T., Esq., Stiffkey Old Hall, near Wells, Norfolk 
Page, Robert, Esq., Charlton-Mackrel, Somerton, Somerset 
Paget, Rev. Edward, M.A., Fair Oak Lodge, Petersfield, Hants 
Paige, Rev. Lewis, M.A., Hartlepool, Durham 
Pain, Thomas, Esq., Winchester 
Paley, Thomas, Esq., Bowling Hall, Bradford 
Paley, Rev. James, Vicar of Lacock, Chippenham, Wilts 
Palin, Mr. William, Gherrington, near Newport, Salop 
Palmer, Rev. Dr., Yarcombe, Chard, Somerset [Tyne 

Palmer, Charles M., Esq., St. Mary's Terrace, Newcastle-upon- 
Parfett, W. B., Esq., Eversley, Hants 

Park, Rev. James Allan, M.A., Elwick Hall, Stockton-upon-Tees 
Parker, Rev. C. F., Rector of Ringshall, Needham-Market 
Parker, George, Esq., Bixley, Norwich 
Parker, Rev. Henry, M.A., Rtctor of Ilderton, Wooler 
Parker, Hugh, jun., Esq., Gannow Hill, & of Woodthorpe, Sheffield 
Parker, John, Esq., M.P., Woodthorpe, Sheffield 
Parker, Samuel, Esq., Low Elswick, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Parker, Capt. W., Clopton Hall, Woolpit, near Stow Market 
Parker, Rev. W.Harris, M.A., Newport, Isle of Wight 
Parkes, Thos. Wm., Esq., Verulam Buildings, Gray's Inn, London 
Parkin, Rev. John, Halton Parsonage, near Hastings 
Parkin, Thomas, Esq., Blyth, Nottinghamshire 
Parkinson, Rev. A. M., B.A., Cawthome, Barnsley 
Parkyns, G., Esq., Chediston Park, near Halesworth 
Parry, Rev. John Peers, M.A., Bothal Park, Morpeth 
Parsley, Samuel, Esq., Worle, Somerset 
Parsons, Rev. Henry, Rector of Goathurst, Somerset 
Patchett, John T., Esq., Union Bank, Halifax 
Patrent, Ambrose, Esq., Gorton House, Heytesbury, Wilts 
Pattinson, Hugh Lee, Esq., Gateshead, Durham 
Pattinson, William Watson, Esq., Felling, Gateshead 
Patton, William, Esq., Devonshaw House, Dollar 
Paver, Christopher, Esq., Peckfield, Selby 
Paver, Rev. Richard, Vicar of Bray ton, do. 
Paul, G. R., Esq., Portland Lodge, Worthing 
Paull, Matthew, Esq., Compton-Pauncefoot, Wincanton 
Pawson, William, Esq., J.P., Mayor of Leeds, 1842, Lawns House, 

[Farnley, Leeds 

Pawson, W., Esq., J.P., Shawdon Hall, Alnwick. Northumberland 
Payne, John, Esq., The Cottage, Milverton, Somerset 
Payne, Richard Ecroyd, Esq., Roundhay, Leeds 
Peachey, Rev. John, Ebernoe, Kirdford, near Petworth, Sussex 
Peacock, Anthony, Esq., Rauceby.rear Sleaford, Lincolnshire 
Peacock, John S., Esq., Solicitor, Darlington 
Pearce, Francis, Esq., Hadley Lodge, Wellington, Salop 
Pearse, Rev. William, Fairlight, near Hastings, Sussex 
Pearson, Rev. C. James, B. A. .Incumbent of St. John's, Bradford 
Pearson, Rev. John, Garencieres, Little Staughton, Bedfordshire 
Pearson, Matthew, Esq., Solicitor, Selby 
Pearson, Thomas, Esq., Croslands, Lockwood, Huddersfield 
Pearson, Rev. William, M.A., Norton Parsonage, Sheffield 
Pease, Rev. G., M.A., Vicar of Darrington, Ponttfract 
Peckover, Daniel, Esq., Woodhall, Calverley, Bradford 
Peel, Lawrence, Esq., Sussex Square, Kemptown, Brighton 
Peel, Thomas, Esq., Trenant Park, Looe, Cornwall 
Peirson, John, Esq., Thornton Fields, Guisborough 
Peirson, John, Esq., Guildhall, Framlingham 
Pelham, Hon. and Rev. J. F., Rector of Bergh-Apton, Norwich 
Pellelt, Michael, Esq., Arundel, Sussex 
Pemberton, Ralph S.. Esq., Usworth House, Gateshead 
Ptmberton, Richard, Esq., Barnes, Sunderland 
Pendarves, Edward W. W., Esq., M.P., Pendarves, Cornwall 
Penrice, Rev. Charles, Rector of Little Plumstead, near Norwich 
Perigal, Rev. Charles, M.A., Vicar of Ellingham, Alnwick 
Perkins & Backhouse, Messrs., Architects, Leeds 
Perks, John, Esq., Buiton-upoii-Trent, Staffordshire 



Perring, J. P., Esq., Combe-Florey, near Taunton, Somerset 
Perry, Rev. Edward, Vicar of Llangattock-Vibon-Abel, Monmouth 
Peters, John Weston, Esq., Bridge, South Petherton, Somerset 
Pettigrew, Rev. Augustus F., B.A., Bishop- Wearmouth, 
Peyton, Sir Henry, Bart., Swifts House, Oxon 
Phayre, Rev. Richard, West Raynham Rectory, near Rougham 
Pliear, Rev. John, Earl-Stonham Rectory, Stouham 
Phillimore, Rev. Robert, M.A., Vicar of Shipton- under- Wychwood 
Phillips, George, Esq., Brockton, near Shiffnall, Salop 
Phillips, Rev. Herbert, M.A., Rector and Vicar of Folklon, Hun- 
Phillips, John Lort, Esq., Staindrop, Darlington [manby 
Phillips, Rev. John M., M.A., Vicar of Skidbrooke, Louth 
Phillips, T. Bentley, Esq., Solicitor, Beverley 
Phillips, Thomas John, Esq., Landue, Launceston 
Phillips, Rev. W. J. G., A.M., Vicar of Eling, Hants 
Pickcup, Mark, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford 

Piele, Rev. T. W., Head Master of Repton School, Burton-on-Trent 
Pierce, William, Esq., Leominster, Herefordshire 
Pierson, Sir W. H., Km., Emsworth, near Chichester 
Pighills, Joseph, Esq., Appeiley Bridge, Bradford 
Pigott, Francis, Esq., Heckfield, Hants 

Pilkington, Captain, R.N., Halnaker Cottage, near Chichester 
Filling, Albert, Esq., Westfield, Huddersfield 
Pinckney, P., Esq., Wilsford House, Wilts 
Piper, Stephen Edward, Esq., Darlington 

Pippet, George, Esq., National Provincial Bank of England, Bar- 
Pitman, Harry H., Esq., Exeter [nard-Castle 
Pitman, Rev. Samuel, Oulton Hall, Aylsham 
Pix, Thomas, Esq., Woodside, Peasmarsh, near Rye 
Platt, Alexander, Esq., Worcester College, Oxford 
Platt, George E. Esq., Denne Park, near Horsham 
Player, G., Esq., Ryde, Isle of Wight 
Plowman, Thomas, Esq., North Curry, near Taunton 
Plues, Samuel Swire, Esq., Solicitor, Ripon 
Plumer, Rev. Chailes John, M.A., Norton, Stockton-upon-Tees 
Plummer, Matthew, Esq., J.P., Sheriffhill House, Gateshead Fell 
Pocock, Rev. G., Vicar of Hailsham, Sussex 
Pollard, George Thomas, Esq., Stannary Hall, Halifax 
Pollard, Joshua, Esq., J.P., Crow Trees, Bradford 
Pollen, Sir John, Bart., Redenham, Andover, Hants 
Pollit, Thomas, jun., Broadgaces, Halifax 
PollocJc, James, Esq., J.P., Gateshead, Durham 
Poole, Charles, Esq., Height House, Pudsey, Leeds 
Poole, Francis, Esq., Solicitor, Hartlepool 
Pope, Rev. Benjamin, Vicarage, Nether Stowey, Bridgwater 
Pope, John, Esq., Symondsbury, Bridport 
Popham, C. Wallis, Esq., Trevarno, Helston, Cornwall 
Popplewell, William, Esq., Solicitor, South Cave, Hull 
Portal, John, Esq., Freefolk-Priors, Overton, Hants 
Portal, William, Esq., Laverstoke, Hants 

Porteous, James Alison, Esq., Tilgate Lodge, near Crawley, Sussex 
Porr, Rev. George, M.A., Monk-Sherborne. Basingstnke 
Porter, Charles, Esq., Spital Tongues House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Porter, Richard, Esq., Quay Mills, Fareham, Hants 
Porter, William Henry, Esq., Dunston, Gateshead 
Potchett, Rev. Brownlow, Great Ponton Rectory, nearGrantham 
Potter, Archibald Gilchrist, Esq., Walbottle House, Newcastle- 
Potter, Edward, Esq., South Helton, Durham [upon-Tyne 
Potter, H. G., Esq., Jesmond High Terrace, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Potts, Rev. James, B.A., Whorlton, Barnard-Castle, Durham 
Potts, John, Esq., J. P., Benton Park, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
POULETT, The Right Honourable the Earl 
Poulton, William, Esq., The College, Huddersfield 
Powell, Rev. Henry W., M.A., Laceby, Brigg 
Powell, James, Esq., Chichester" 
Powell, Rev. Richmond, Boxgrove, near Chichester 
Powell, William H., Esq., M.D., Fareham, Hants 
Powley, Rev. J., M.A., Legbourn, Louth 
Powney, Captain John, Orizava, Chudleigh, Devon 
Powney, Rev. Henry, M.A., Over Wallop, Hants 
Poyner, Henry, Esq., Hadley, near Wellington, Salop 
Pratt, William Dodd, Esq., Architect, Sunderland 
Pratt, Mr. Samuel, Taverham Church Farm, near Norwich 
Prescott, Rev. I. Philip, B.A., Romsey, Hants 
Prest, John, Esq., York 

Preston, Rev. H. Edmund, Tasburgh Rectory, near Long Stratton 
Preston, John, Esq., Mearbeck, Settle 
Preston, Thomas Baynes, Esq., Solicitor, Skipton 
Preston, Rev. William, M.A., Rector of Bulmer, and Vicar of 
Pretor, Samuel, Es^., Sherborne House [Whenby, Yorkshire 

Price, Charles, Esq., Tenbury, Salop 

Prickett, Rev. Josiah J., B.A., South Cave, Kingston-upon-Hull 
Pridham, George, Esq., Plymouth 



XXIV 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Prime, Richard, Esq., Walberton House, near Arundel 

Prior, Rev. Henry, B.A., Saxton, Tadcaster 

Pritchard, George, Esq., Broseley, Salop 

Procter, Rev. Aislabie, A.B., Alwinton, Rothbury 

Procter, Rev. William, B.C.L., Vicar of Bishop Burton, Beverley 

Procter, Rev. William, M.A., Doddington, Wooler 

Proctor, Rev. George, D.D., Chichester House, Brighton 

Proctor, Sir W. B., Bart., Langley Park, Loddon, near Norwich 

Protheroe, Rev. T., M.A., Wimerslow, Wilts 

Prower, Rev. John Merwin, Vicar of Purton, do. 

Pryce, S. D., Esq., Redruth, Cornwall 

Pullein, Rev. John, M.A., Vicar of Kirkthorpe, Wakefield 

Pulley, Rev. William, Hawnes Vicarage, Ampthill, Bedfordshire 

Pulleyne, Rev. Benjamin, A.M., Vicar of Sheringham, Holt 

Pulteney, John, Esq., Northerwood, Lyndhurst, Hants 

Pumfrett, George Belts, Esq., Huntingdon 

Purcell, Rev. Jas. G., M.A., Vicar of Worminghall, Thame, Oxon 

Punly, Robert, Esq., Salthouse, near Cley, Norfolk 

Purton, Thomas Pardoe, Esq., Fairtree, Bridgenorth 

Putsey, Rev. William, Incumbent of Kirk-Leavington, Yarm 

Pycock, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Incumbent of Morley, near Leeds 

Pym, Francis, Esq., The Hasells, Biggleswade 

Pym, Rev. Robert, M.A., Rector of Elmley, Wakefield 

Pym, Rear- Admiral Sir Samuel, Loosleys, Tamerton, Devon 

Quick, James, Esq., Southampton 

Quick, John, Esq., Newton House, Devon 

Raban, William, Esq., Hatch- Beauchamp, near Taunton 

Rabett, Rev. Reginald, Bramfield Hall, near Halesworth 

Radclyffe, Rev. Henry Clifford, B.A., Nun-Monkton, York 

Raine, Rev. John, M.A., Vicar of Blyth, Nottinghamshire 

Raines, Rev. Charles Alfred, B.A., J arrow, Gateshead 

Ram, Rev. Abel John, M.A., Incumbent of the Minster, Beverley 

Ramsay, Geo. Heppel, Esq., J.P., Derwent Villa, Newcastle- upon- 

Ramsay, Ralph, Esq., Scotswood, Newcastle-upon-Tyne ['''y n 

Ramsden, Rev. Edward, M.A., Incumbent of Bradshaw, Halifax 

Ramsden, Robert, Esq., Carlton Hall, Worksop, Notts 

Ramshaw, Rev. Christopher, M.A., Vicar of Fewston, Otley 

Ramskill, John, Esq., Solicitor, Pontefract 

Rand, John, Esq., J.P., Wheatley Hall, Bradford 

Randall, Rev. J., M.A., Incumbent of Hawley, Hants 

Randolph, Rev. Charles, M.A., Rector of Kimpton, Andover 

Randolph, James, Esq., Milverton, Somerset 

Ransom, John, Esq., Holt, Norfolk 

Ranson, George Smith, Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland 

Raven, John, Esq., Summerfield, near Docking, Norfolk 

Ravenshaw, Rev. Edward, Rector of West Kington, Chippenham 

RAVENSWORTH, The Right Honourable Lord 

Rawlings, Rev. James, M.A., Rector of St. Pinnock, Cornwall 

Rawlins, Rev. Christopher, Vicar of Thornton cum Alleilhorpe, 

Rawlins, George, Esq., Woolverton Park, Hants [Pocklington 

Rawson, Christopher, Esq., Hope House, Halifax 

Rawson, Edward, Esq., Ash Grove, do. 

Rawson, John, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford 

Rawson, Thomas W., Esq., Belvedere, Bradford 

Rawson, George, Esq., Nottingham do. 

Rawstorne, Walker, Esq., Architect, 

Raymond, Rev. G., Rector of Symondsbury, Bridport [upon-Tees 

Raymond, Rev. Jn. Mayne St. Clere.M.A., Norton, nearStockton- 

Rayne, Charles, Carville House, Walls End, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Rayner, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Sheffield 

Rayson, Robert, Esq., Stockton- upon-Tees 

Rea, James, Esq., North Middleton, Wooler 

Read, Henry, Esq., Worlingham, near Beccles 

Read, Mr. James B., Penryn, Cornwall 

Read, J. Offley Crewe, Esq., Laverton House, Southampton 

Read, John, Esq., Derwent Hall, Sheffield 

Read, Rev. Thos. Fr. R., M.A., Rector of Full-Sutton, Pocklington 

Read, W. H. Rudston, Esq.,M.A., F.L.S., J.P.,Hayton, do. 

Reade, Rev. R., B.A., Rector of Romaldkirk, Barnard- Castle 

Ready, Rev. H., Rector of Waxham, near Stalham, Norfolk 

Redgrave, Mark, Esq., Catton Lodge, Norwich 

Redmayne, Thomas, Esq., Taitlands, Stainforth, Settle 

Reed, Rev. Christopher, M.A., Vicar of Tynemouth 

Reed, George, Esq., Manor House, Burnham, Bridgwater 

Reed, Henry John, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

RCPS, Rev. Samuel, Vicar of Horsey, North Walsham 

Register, the General, Office for Births, Marriages, and Deaths 

Reid, Jarnes, Esq., Shieldneld, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Rennoldson, John, Esq., Jesmond Grove, do. 

Reynard, Charles, Esq., Hob Green, Ripley 

Reynolds, William, Esq., Trevenson, Redruth, Cornwall 

Rhoades, Thomas, Esq., Chichester 

Rhodes, Rev. James Armitage, M.A., J.P., Horsforth Hall, Leeds 



Rice, Rev. Francis W., B.A., Vicar of Fairford, Gloucestershire 

Rice, Henry, Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight 

Rice, Howard, Esq., Stoneham Cottage, Highfield, Southampton 

Richards, J. W., Esq., Stapleton, Martock, Somerset 

Richards, Rev. S. More, M.A., Incumbent of Thorpe, Rotherham 

Richards, Rev. Thos., Vicar of Ickleshmn, near Winchelsea, Sussex 

Richards, Rev. William, A.M., Reading, Berks 

Richardson, Rear-Admiral Sir C., K.C.B., Painsthorpe, Pocklington 

Richardson, Col., Life Guards, Blue, Fulford House, York 

Richardson, John, Esq., Heydon, near Reepham, Norfolk 

Richardson, Jonathan, Esq., Shotley Bridge, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Richardson, Thomas, Esq., Eden Vale, Castle Eden, Durham 

Richardson, Rev. William, M.A., Sherburn House, do. 

Richardson, Wormley E., Esq., Riccall Hall, Selby, Yorkshire 

Richardson, W. W., Esq., Fincion Place, near Worthing 

Richmond, Rev. G., M.A., Grammar School, Haydon Bridge 

Ricketts, G. R.G., Esq., Woodside, North Stoneham, Southampton 

Rickman, John, Esq., Willingham, near Lewes [Tyne 

Riddell, Edward, Esq., J.P., Cheeseburn Grange, Newcastle-upon- 

Ridding, Thomas, Esq., Hawthorn Cottage, Southampton 

Ridehalgh, John, Esq., Solicitor, Brigroyd, Halifax 

Ridehalgh, Richard, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford 

Ridge, William, Esq., Stoneham, near Lewes 

Ridley, John, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Ridley, John, Esq., Alderman & J.P., do. 

Ridley, John, Esq., Park End House, Hexham 

Ridley, Sir Mathew W'hite, Bart., Blagdon, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Ridley, Samuel, Esq., Shieldfield, do. 

Ridley, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, do. 

Ridsdale, George, Esq., Old Hall, Wakefield 

Ridsdale, John, Esq., North Grove, Wetherby [Driffield 

Rigby, Rev. J., Vicar of Hutton-Cranswick, & P.C. of Beswick, 

Riley, John, Esq., Hawksclough, Hebden Bridge 

Ripley, Edward, Esq., Lodge, Bowling, Bradford 

Ripley, George Bates, Esq., do. do. 

Rippingall, Rev. S. Frost, Langham, near Holt, Norfolk 

Rippon, George, Esq., J.P., Water- Ville, North Shields 

Rising, William, Esq., Somerton Hall, Yarmouth 

Ritso, F. Esq., Cley Hall, near Holt 

Ritso, Captain John, South Parade, Doncaster 

Robb, Major F. C., E.I.C.S., Woolston Lawn, Southampton 

Roberson, Rev. F. Berners, M. A. .Ovingham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Roberson, Henry, Esq., Healds Flail, Liversedge, Leeds 

Robert, Joseph Edward, Esq., Solicitor, Delph, Saddleworth 

Roberts, Rev. George, Vicar of Monmouth 

Robertson, Rev. Ebenezer, Rector of Mottiston, Isle of Wight 

Robertson, George, Esq., Thornton Dale, Pickering 

Robins, Foster, and Co., Messrs., East Cornwall Bank, Liskeard 

Robins, Thomas, Esq., Liskeard, Cornwall 

Robinson, Benjamin, Esq., M.D., Rotherham 

Robinson, Benjamin, Lane, Huddersfield 

Robinson, Rev. Christopher, M.A. & J.P., Kirknewton, Wooler 

Robinson, Edward, jun., Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight 

Robinson, George, Esq., Houghton-le-Spring 

Robinson, George, Esq., Solicitor, Rotherham 

Robinson, Rev. (J. Alington, B.A., Hector of Irby-upon-Humber 

Robinson, Rev. John, M.A., Rectory, Bentham, Settle 

Robinson, John, Esq., Craven Bank, Skipton 

Robinson, John, Esq., South fields 

Robinson, John E., Esq., Coatham, Guisborough 

Robinson, Thomas, Esq., Huddeisfield 

Robinson, Thomas, Esq., Potternewton & Leeds 

Robinson, Thomas, Esq., Darlington 

Robinson, Thomas, Esq., Harrogate 

Robinson, W. Robinson, Esq., Silksworth Hall, Sunderland 

Robinson, Rev. W. B., Rector of Littlington, Lewes 

Robson, Edward, Esq., Swalwell, Gateshead 

Robson, Rev. Js., M.A. & J.P., Ponteland, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Robson, John, Esq., Hetton, Durham 

Robson, John, Esq., Monk-Wearmouth [Bridge 

Robson, Rev. John Evans, M.A., Incumbent of Hartwith, Pateley 

Robson, Joseph, Esq., Gateshead Park, Durham 

Robson, Thomas, Esq., The Heath, Halifax 

Rodwell, George, Esq., Burnham- Deepdale, Norfolk 

Rodgers, Rev. Chailes Eboral, M.A., Vicar of Harworth, Bawtry 

Rodgers & Sons, Messrs. Joseph, Cutlers, Sheffield, Yorkshire 

Rogers, Arundel, Esq., Helston, Cornwall 

Rogers, Henry, Esq., Thetford 

Rogers, John Jenkins, Esq., Huntspill Court, Bridgwater 

Rogers, Rev. J. M.A., Canon of Exeter, Penrose, Cornwall 

Rogers, Joseph, Esq., Cross Flatts House, Beeston, Leeds 

Rogers, Rev. R. G., Rector of Yailington, Somerset 

Rogers, Lieutenant-Colonel W. Cooper, Highfield, Southampton 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



XXV 



Rogerson, Thomas, Esq., Grove House, Bramley ; & Leeds 
Rokeby, Langham, Esq., Arthingworth Hall, Northampton 
Rolfe, Rev. S. C.'E. N., Vicar of Heacham, Heacharn Hall, near 
Romney, Rev. John, M.A., Cramlington, Newcastle-upori-Tyne 
Roolce, Rev. Willoughby, M.A., Old Alresford, Hants 
Roots, Ur. William, Surbiton, Kingston- upon-Thames 
Roper, John, Esq., York 
Roper, Rev. T. A., Clifton, Nottingham 
Roper, Rev. T. R., Wick Hill House, Hove, near Brighton 
Rose, J. C., Esq., Cransley Hall, near Kettering 
Rose, Sir-George, Bart., M.P., Christchurch, Hants [House, Settle 
Roughsedge, Hornby, Esq., J.P., Foxghyll, Ambleside; & Bentham 
Roundell, Richard Henry, Esq., J.P.,Gledstone, Skipton 
Rous, Rev. George, Rector of Laverton, Somersetshire 
Rouse, Joshua, Esq., Barkisland, Halifax 
Rowden, Rev. F. Marmaduke, B.A., Highworth, Wilts 
Rowden, Mr. John, Heytesbury, Wilts 
Rowell, Thomas, Esq., Mayor of Hartlepool in 1843 
Rowley, Rev. Thomas, D.D., Bridgenorth, Salop 
Roxby, James William, Esq., J.P., Ogle Terrace, South Shields 
Royle, Rev. John, Rector of Compton-Martin, Somersetshire 
Royston, Aquila E., Esq., West Parade, Halifax 
Rudd, Rev. Edward, D.D., Trebartha Hall, Cornwall 
Rudd, J. B., Esq., Guisborough 

Rumbold, C. E., Esq., M.P., Preston-Candover, Hants 
Russ, Harry, Esq., Castle-Carey, Somerset 
Russell, David, Esq., Solicitor, York 

Russell, Rev. H. V., Stottesden Vicarage, near Cleobury-Mortimer, 
Russell, Samuel, Esq., Blyth, Nottinghamshire [Salop 

Russell, Messrs. Thomas A. & James, Solicitors, Alnwick 
Rutherford, Andr., Esq., M.P., Craigie Hall, Cramond, Edinburgh 
Rutland, Mrs. Margaret, Testerton House, near Fakenham 
Ryall, William, Esq., Butleigh, Somerset 

Ryder, Rev. George Dudley, M.A., Rector of Easton, Winchester 
Ryle, Matthew, Esq., Herrington Hill, Houghton-le-Spring 
Sabben, Rev. James, M.A., Rector of St. Denis, York 
Sadler, John, Esq., Percy Banks, North Shields 
Sadler, Joseph, Esq., \Vinterton, Lincolnshire 
Saint Andrews, University of, Scotland 
Sainsbury, Rev. Henry, Rector of Beckington, Somersetshire 
Sainsbury, Rev. Langford, M.A., Froyle Parsonage, Alton, Hants 
Salt, Titus. Esq., Bradford 
Salter, Richard, Esq., Arundel, Sussex 
Salter, Thomas, Esq., Attleburgh Hall, Norfolk 
Salter, Thomas Bell, Esq., M.D., and F.L.S., Ryde, Isle of Wight 
Salter, W. P., Esq., New Hall Farm, Whinburgh, Norfolk 
Sampson, Rev. T., M.A., Eakring Rectory, Ollerton, Notts 
Sanctuary, Thomas, Esq., Worthing, Sussex 
Sanders, Samuel, Esq., Fernhill Park, Isle of Wight 
Sanderson, John, Esq., New Hall, Attercliffe, Sheffield 
Sanderson, R. Esq., Gunton Park, and Belgrave Square, London 
Sanderson, R. Burdon, jun., Esq., West Jesmond, Newcastle 
Sandford, Charles S. R., Esq., Northfield House, Rotherham 
Sandford, Rev. John, M.A., Vicar of Dunchurch 
Sandys, Carne, and Vivian, Messrs., Hayle, Penzance 
Savage, Thomas, Esq., Midsomer-Norton, Somerset 
Sawle, Sir J. S. Graves, Bart., Peurice, St. Austell, Cornwall 
Say, Rev. Henry, Swatfham, Norfolk 
Scarbrough, John, Esq., Wintringham, Brigg 
Scatchard, John, Esq., East Keswick, Harewood, Yorkshire 
Scatcherd, Thomas, Esq., Boston, Tadcaster 
Schobell, Rev. John Samuel, B.A., Vicar of St. Kew, Cornwall 
Scholefield, Michael, Esq., Manor House, Temple-Newsom, Leeds 
Scholefield, Thomas, Esq., Ivy House, Leeds 
Scholefield, William, Esq., Batley House, Baildon, Bradford 
Scholes, Joseph Seddon, Esq., Slaithwaite, Huddersfield 
Scholfield, E., Esq., M.D., Doncaster 

Scholfield, William, Esq., Sand Hall, Howden [Steyning, Sussex 
Schomberg, Rev. Alexander William, M.A., Rector of Edburtcn 
Scott, Carteret George, Esq., Malleny, Currie, Edinburgh 
Scott, Rev. E., St. John's Parsonage, Wakefield, Yorkshire 
Scott, Rev. George Henry, M.A., Ifield, near Crawley, Sussex 
Scott, Henry E., Esq., Manchester & Leeds Railway, Wakefield 
Scott, John, Esq., J.P., Sunderland 
Scott, Joseph, Esq., Badsworth Hall, Yorkshire 
Scott, Richard, Esq., Solicitor, Sunderland 
Scott, Rev. Walter, S.T.P., Airedale College, Bradford 
Scott, W. L. Fenton, Esq., J.P., \Vood Hall, Wetherby 
Scroggs, Lieut.-Col., Standen, Chute, Wilts 
Scurfield, Robert, jun., Esq., Sunderland 
Scutt, Thomas W., Esq., Lewes, Sussex 
Seagram, E. F., Esq., Bratton House, Westbury, Wilts 
Seagram, W. F., Esq., Warminster 
VOL. I. 



Seagrave, Rev. S. Young, M.A., Rector of Westcott Barton, Oxon 
Seaton, Rev. John, M.A., Incumbent of Cleckheaton, Leeds 
Sedgwick, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Vicar of Scalby, Scarborough 
Selby, Prideaux, Esq., Swansfield, Alnwick 
Selby, Prideaux J., Esq., Twizell House, Belford, Durham 
Semple, George, Esq., Shipley Hall, Bradford 
Senior, Joseph, Esq., Dalton Ledge, Huddersfield 
Senior, Joseph, Esq., Batley, Dewsbury 
Seppings, Thomas, Esq., Whitehall, Syderstone, Fakenham 
Seppings, William, Esq., Lynn 

Sergeantson, Rev. R. J., M.A., Vicar of Snaith, Yorkshire 
Settle, Joseph, Esq., Oxford Street, Leeds 
Sewell, Messrs., Newport, Isle of Wight 
Seymour, Capt. Michael, R.N., Cadlington, Horndean, Hants 
Seymour, George Hicks, Esq., Solicitor, York 
Sh'ackleton, John, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Shadwell, W. Lucas, Esq., Hastings, Sussex [Durham 

Shafto, Rev. Arthur Duncombe, Jun., M.A., Houghton-le-Spring, 
Sharp, David Wilkinson, Esq., Bingley, Yorkshire 
Sharp, Rev. John, D.D., Vicar of Doncaster 
Sharp, Rev. John, M.A., Incumbent of Horbury, W r akefield 
Sharpe, Samuel, Esq., Docking, Rougham, Norfolk 
Shattock, John, Esq., Bishop's-Lydeard, Taunton 
Shaw, Benjamin L., Esq., Honley, Huddersfield 
Shaw, William, Esq., Miluthorp Cottage, Wakefield 
Shaw, William, Esq., Seed Hill, Holmfirth, Yorkshire 
Shaw, Mr. W., St. John's Common, Keymer, near Brighton 
Shebbear, Joseph Charles, Esq., Basingstoke 
Shedden, Captain Lewis, Bittern Manor House, Southampton 
Sheepshanks, The Rev. and Ven. John, Archdeacon of Cornwall 
SHEFFIELD, The Right Honourable the Earl of 
Shelley, John Villiers, Esq., Maresfield Park, near Uckfield, Sussex 
Shelley, Sir Thomas, Bart., Field Place, near Horsham 
Shelton, Charles Jackson, Esq., Bradford 
Shephard, John, Esq., Doctors Commons, London 
Shepherd, John, jun., Esq., St. Mark's Villa, Woodhouse, Leeds 
Shepherd, R., Esq., Solicitor, Driffield 
Shepherd, Rev. Robert, M.A., Houghton-le-Spring 
Shepherd, Rev. Samuel, B.A., North Somercoates, Louth 
Shepherd & Simpson, Messrs., Solicitors, Beverley 
Shepherd, Rev. Thomas H., Rector of Clayworth, Bawtry 
Shepherd, William, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 
Sheppard, George, Esq., Fromefield House, near Frome, Somerset 
Sheppard, SirThomas Cotton, Bart., Crakemarsh Hall, Uttoxeter 
Sherard, Philip Castel, Esq., Glaton, near Stilton, Hunts 
Shei borne, King's School Library 

Sheriffe, Rev. T., jun., M.A., Henstead Hall, Wrentham, Suffolk 
Sherson, Rev. Robert, M.A., Oxon, Rector of Yaverland 
Sherwin, J. Sherwin, Esq., Bramcote Hills, Nottingham 
Sherwood, Rev. William, B.A., Holybourne, Alton, Hants 
Shevill, John Heppell, Esq., Sunderland 
Shield, Robert Spencer, Esq., Chester-le-Street 
Shields, William, Esq., Gateshead, Durham 

Shipperdson, Rev. Thomas R., M.A., Vicar of W r oodhorn, Morpeth 
Shirley, Charles, Esq., Midhurst, Sussex 
Shirreff, Rev. R. St. John, B.A., Oxon, Blackheath 
Shirt, John, Esq., Wales, Sheffield 
Shooter, Rev. J., M.A., Vicar of Bishop-Wilton, York 
Shrubb, Rev. Charles, M.A., Vicar of Boldre, Lymington, Hants 
Shorter & Phillips, Messrs., Hastings, Sussex 
Shutt, Isaac Thomas, Esq., Architect, Low-Harrogate 
Sidebotham, Edward Lowe, Esq., J.P., Aston Hall, Sheffield 
Sidebottom, Edward, Esq., Pleadwick Hall, Wakefield 
Siely, B. C., Esq., Beech Grove, North Walsham 
Sigston, William, Esq., Gomersal Hall, Leeds 
Sillick, James, Esq., Claremont Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Silver, Rev. Thomas, LL.D., Vicar of Charlbury, Oxon 
Simcoe, Rev. Henry, A., Penheale, Launceston, Cornwall 
Simes, F., Esq., Townend House, Bradford 
Simes, Mr. Henry, Vine Hall, near Robertsbridge, Battle 
Simpson, Alfred, Esq., Solicitor, Malton 
Simpson, Christopher, Esq., East Hal ton, Skipton 
Simpson, Rev. Fred. R., M.A., North Sunderland, Belford 
Simpson, Rev. G. F., M.A., Principal of the College, Kingston-upon- 
Simpson, Rev. John. M.A., Vicarage, Acklam, Malton [Hull 

Simpson, Rev. John Pemberton.M.A., Wakefield 
Simpson, Joseph Pringle, Esq., Springwell, Bishop- Wearmouth 
Simpson, Rev. M., Rector of Mickfield, Stonham, Suffolk 
Simpson, Rev. Philip, M.A., Copthorne, Fawley, Hants 
Simpson, Robert, Esq., Alnmouth, Alnwick 

Simpson, Rev.Thos.,M.A., Perpetual Curate of Cold Kirby, Thirsk 
Simpson, Thomas, Esq., M.D., Yoik 

Simpson, Rev. William, M.A., Incumbent of Tanfield, Durham 

C 



XXVI 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Sinclair, Rev. W., M.A., Incumbent of St. George's, Leeds 

Singleton, John, Esq., Carr House, Rotherham 

Siny, Joshua, Esq., Bridgenorth, Salop 

Siny, William, Esq., Swancote, Bridgenorth 

Sivewright, Charles Kane, Esq., Musbury, Axminster, Devon 

Skelley, Thomas, Esq., Freelands, Alnwick 

Skelton, Charles Jackson, Esq., Manor Street, Bradford 

Skelton, Henry, jun., Esq., Field Head, Thorner, Leeds 

Skelton, John, Esq., Moor-Allerton House, Leeds 

Skelton, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Vicar of Wold-Newton, Hunmanby 

Skelton, Rev. Robert, M.A., Rector of Levisham, Pickering 

Skey, Robert S. Esq., Newport, Salop 

Slack, Rev. Sam., M.A., Head Master, Grammar School, Bradford 

Slade, Mr. Henry, Edington, Westbury, Wilts 

Sladen, Thomas, Esq., Mearclough House, Halifax 

Slater, Rev.Thos. Augustine, R.C.P., Hutton House, Castle Eden 

Slatter, William, Esq., Surgeon, Wakefield 

Sleigh, Major-Gen., Shirley House, near Southampton 

Slight, Lewis, Esq., Brighton, Sussex 

Smalman, John, Esq.,Quatford Castle, Bridgenorth 

Smart, Daniel, Esq., Emsworth, near Chichester 

Smeddle, R., Esq., Bamburgh Castle, Belford 

Smetham, J. Esq., Lynn, Norfolk 

Smith, Bartholomew, Esq., Timsbury, near Bath 

Smith, Lieut.-Col. Charles, Plainville, York 

Smith, Charles Sergison, Esq., Farleigh House, Basingstoke 

Smith, Edward, Esq., Armfield Plain, Gateshead 

Smith, Rev. Edward Herbert, B.A., Killamarsh, Chesterfield 

Smith, George Nicholson, Esq., Surgeon, Goole 

Smith, George Pyemont, Esq., M.D., Park Row, Leeds 

Smith, Mr. George, Camborne, Cornwall 

Smith, Rev. Hen. Jno., M.A., Incumbent of Birkenshaw, nr. Leeds 

Smith, Jeremiah, Esq., Springfield Villa, near Rye, Sussex 

Smith, John, Esq., Field House, Horton, Bradford 

Smith, John, Esq., Morton, Bingley 

Smith, John, Esq.,Weyhill House, Andover, Hants 

Smith, John, Esq., St. Anne's, Lewes, Sussex 

Smith, Rev. John Tetley, Repton, near Burton-upon-Trent 

Smith, Joseph, Esq., Low Street, Keighley 

Smith, Lawrence, Esq., Mount Villa, Hurst-Pierepoint, Sussex 

Smith, Noel Thomas, Esq., M.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Smith, Rev. Robert, Chaplain at Haggerston Castle, Berwick 

Smith, Robert, Esq., Oldcoates, Tickhill 

Smith, Rev. Robert, M.A., Kyloe, Belford 

Smith, Rev. Samuel, M.A., Grindleton, Clitheroe 

Smith, Mrs. S. Mackworth, Bersted Lodge, Bognor 

Smith, Spencer, Esq., Brooklands, Southampton 

Smith, Stephen, Esq., Brown's Place, Robert's Bridge, near Battle 

Smith, Tilden, Esq., Vine Hall, near Battle, Sussex 

Smith, Thomas, Esq., M.D., Leeds 

Smith, Thomas George, Esq., Togston House, Alnwick 

Smith, Thompson, Esq., Willington Quay, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Smith, Walker, Esq., Brotherton, Ferrybridge 

Smith, William, Esq., Learmouth, Coldstream 

Smith, William, Esq., Benton Lodge, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Smith, William, Esq., Mayor of Leeds 

Smith, Rev. William Henry, M.A., Hinderwell, Guisborough 

Smith, William, Esq., Potton, Bedfordshire 

Smithson, Charles, Esq., Solicitor, Malton 

Smithson, Robert, Esq., Holtby Hall, York 

Smithson, Samuel, Esq., Heighington, Darlington 

Smyth, Rev. George Watson, M.A., Rector of Fyfield, Hants 

Smyth, John George, Esq., J. P., Heath Hall, Wakefield 

Smyth, Rev. T. Graham, Aldwick Lodge, near Bognor 

Smythe, William Meade, Esq., Deer Park, Honiton, Devon 

Sorby, James, Esq. ,Gatefield House, Sheffield 

Sorsbie, Malin, Esq., Deckham Hall, Gateshead 

Southwells and Co., Messrs. Bridgenorth 

Sowerby, J. N. P., Esq., Solicitor, Stokesley 

Sowerby, Thomas, Esq., Saltwell Vale, Gateshead 

Spackman, Charles Esq., Bradford, Wilts 

Sparke, Rev. E. B., Feltwell Rectory, near Brandon 

Sparke, Rev. J. H., Gunthorpe, near East Dereham, Norfolk 

Sparrow, James, Esq., Rye, Sussex 

Sparrow, John, Esq., Bramshott Place, Liphook, Hants 

Speck, Rev. T., Chichester, Sussex 

Speke, Rev. Hugh, M.A., Rector of Dowlish-Wake, Somerset 

Spence, Rev. John, M.A., Rectory, East Keal, Lincolnshire 

Spencer, Rev. Charles John, Radwell Rectory, near Baldock, Herts 

Spencer, George, Esq., North Gate House, Keighley 

Spencer, Rev. Isaac, M.A., The Plantation, York [Tyne 

Spencer, John, jun., Esq., Newburn Steel Works, Newcastle-upon- 

Spencer, Rev. William, M.A., Vicar of Dronh'eld, Sheffield 



Spencer, Rev. W. Pakenham, M.A., Rector of Starston, Norfolk 

Spode, Mrs., Armitage Park, near Rugeley, Staffordshire 

Spurgeon, Rev. Richard, Rector of Mulbarton, near Norwich 

Spurrell, D., Esq., Bessingham, near Aylsham, Norfolk 

Spurrell, W. D., Esq., Thurgarton, do. 

Spink, George, Esq., Solicitor, Howden 

Spink, Henry Hawks, Esq., Tadcaster 

Spours, W., Esq., Solicitor, Alnwick 

ST. GERMANS, The Right Honourable the Earl of 

St. John, The Hon. Gen., Rough Heath, near Chailey, Lewes 

St. John, Rev. H. G., M.A., West Court, Wokingham, Berks 

St. Quintin, Thomas, Jun., Esq., Hatley Park, Cambridgeshire 

St. Quinton, William, Esq., Scampton Hall, Malton 

Stables, George, Esq., Solicitor, Horsforth, Leeds 

Stables, Henry, Esq., Lockwood House, Huddersfield 

Stables, W. W., Esq., Crosland Hall, do. 

Stackhouse, Anthony, Esq., Stainforth, Settle 

Staff, J. R., Esq., Norwich 

STAFFORD, The Right Honourable Lord 

Stafford, W. W., Esq., Hailsham, Sussex 

Stagg, Joseph Dickinson, Esq., Middleton, Barnard-Castle 

Staincliffe, John, Esq., Over Hall, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Stamp and Tax Office, Her Majesty's, Edinburgh 

Staniford, F., Esq., Eldon Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Staniland, George A., Esq., Brotherton House, Ferrybiidge 

Staniland, Samuel, Esq., Leeds 

Stanley, John, Esq., Newport, Salop 

Stanley, Mr. Thomas, Burbage Wharf, nearMarlborough, Wilts 

Stansfeld, George Micklethwait, Esq., Bradford 

Stansfield, James, Esq., Greenbank, Halifax 

Stansfield, James, Esq., Solicitor, Ewood, Todmorden 

Starkey, William, Esq., Wakefield 

STATIONERY OFFICE, Her Majesty's 

Statter, W., Esq., Wakefield 

Staveley, Capt. John, Wales, Sheffield 

Stead, Henry, Esq., Newlaiths, Horsforth, Leeds 

Stead, Henry Cox Mason, Esq., Low-Harrogate 

Stead, Samuel, Esq., Crow Trees, Gomersal, Leeds 

Steel, John, Esq., Bradford 

Stephens, Mr. John, Hurcott, near South Petherton, Somerset 

Stephens, Rev. Richard, Culver House, Exeter 

Stephens, Thomas, Esq., North Shields 

Stephens, Mr. Thomas, White Lackington, Somerset 

Stephenson, Appleton, Esq., Hawsker Hall, VVhitby [Tyne 

Stephenson, Robert, & Co., Messrs., Engineers, Newcastle-upon- 

Stephenson, William, Esq., Lands House, Holmfirth 

Stevens, E., Esq., Walton, Norfolk [Rollright, Oxon 

Stevens, Rev. W. Everett, M.A., Rector of Salford and Little 

Steward, Rev. Francis, Rector of Barking, Needham-Market, Suffolk 

Stileman, Richard, Esq., The Friars, Winchelsea, Sussex 

Stillingfleet, Rev. E. W., B.D., Hotham Cave, Yorkshire 

Stockdale, Rev. Henry, B.A., Bawtry 

Stockdale, Rev. Walter, B.A., Linwood, Market-Rasen 

Stocken, Rev. H., M.A., Incumbent of Arkendale, Knaresborough 

Stocker, Rev. W. H. Browell, Incumbent of Horsforth, Leeds 

Stocks, Joseph, Esq., Upper Shibden Hall, Halifax 

Stocks, Robert, Esq., Abden, Kinghorn 

Stone, Charles, Esq., Prebendal House, Thame, Oxon 

Stone, Rev. D. S., Corneystrowe House, Trull, Somerset 

Stone, George, Esq., Taunton, Somerset 

Stone, W. T., Esq., Stone Bridge, near Uckfield, Sussex 

Storey, Ralph, Esq., Beanley, Alnwick 

Storrs, Robert, Esq., Doncaster 

Story, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Stott, Lieut.-Col., E.I.S., Eccleshill Hall, Bradford 

Stowey, Augustus, Esq., Kenbury, Exminster, Devon 

Stracey, John, Esq., Sprowston, near Norwich 

Straker, John, Esq., Point Pleasant, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Strakers & Love, Messrs., Howdon Dock, do. 

Stratton, William, Esq., Upavon, Pewsey, Wilts 

Streatfeild, R. Shuttleworth, Esq., The Rocks, near Uckfield, Sussex 

Strode, R. C., Esq., Southill House, West Cranmore, Somerset 

Strong, P. B., Esq., Trull, Somerset 

Sturges, John William, Esq., Beech Field, Doncaster 

Sturgis, Rev. Frederick George, Brandsburton, Beverley 

Suckling, Rev. Alfred, LL.B., Rectory, Barsham, Beccles, Suffolk 

Sugden, Joah, Esq., Spring Field House, Huddersfield 

Sugden, John Greenwood, Esq., Steeton Hall, Keighley 

Sugden, Thomas, Esq., Brighouse, Halifax 

Sugden, William, Esq., Eastwood House, Keighley 

Sulivan, George James, Esq., Wilbury Park, Amesbury, Wilts 

Sumner, Gillyatt, Esq., Woodmansey, Beverley 

Sunderland, Rev. S., B.A., Peniston, Barnsley 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



xxvn 



Surtees, Aubone, Esq., Pigdon Cottage, Morpeth 

Sutcliffe, George, Esq., Solicitor, Sowerby-Bridge, Halifax 

Sutcliffe, John Crossley, Esq., Lee, Hebden-Bridge 

Sutcliffe, John F., Esq., Willow Hall, Halifax 

Sutcliffe, Richard, Esq., Lumb Bank, Hebden-Bridge 

Sutcliffe, Thomas, Esq., Stoneshay Gate, do. 

Sutcliffe, William, Esq., Lower Laith, Todmorden 

Sutton, Rev. John Lucas, M.A., Vicar of Weekley, Kettering 

Sutton, Rev. T. Manners, M.A., Averham Rectory, Newark 

Swaiuson, Rev. John, B.A., Old Byland & Kirkdale, Helmsley 

Swale, Rev. H. John, M.A., Ingfield, Settle 

Swallow, John, jun., Esq., Sterne Mill, Halifax 

Swallow, Richard, Esq., Mosborough Hill, Sheffield 

Swan, William Robert, Esq., Solicitor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Swann, John, Esq., Hutton Hall, York 

Swayne, W. C., Esq., Heytesbury, Wilts 

Sweet, Rev. Charles B., M.A., Broadleigh, Somerset 

Sweelland, William, Esq., Staplake Mount, Starcross, Devon 

Sykes, John, Esq., Beech Grove, Leeds 

Sykes, Joseph, Esq., Acre Cottage, Lindley, Huddersfield 

Sykes, Sir Tatton, Bart., Sledmere House, Yorkshire 

Sykes, William, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Sykes, William, Esq., Milns Bridge, Huddersfield 

Sykes, W'illiam, Esq., Mill Bridge, Leeds, Yorkshire 

Sykes, Rev. William, Vicar of Collumpton, Devon 

Symes, Thomas, Esq., Bridgwater, Somerset 

Symons, Henry, Esq., Axbridge, Somerset 

Sympson. Edmund Walcott, Esq., Winkton, Hants 

Syms, Rev. W., West Grinstead, near Horsham, Sussex 

TALBOT, The Right Honourable the Earl 

Talbot, John, Esq., Woodland House, Ashill near Taunton 

Tanner, Henry, Esq., Bishop- Wearmouth 

Tanner, Mr. Joseph, Cholderton, Wilts 

Tanner, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Incumbent of Bradninch, Devon 

Tate, Captain, W. A., E.I.C.S., East Harptree, Somerset 

Tate, Rev. William Bunting, M.A., Vicar of Nether Wallop, Hants 

Taylor, Edward, Esq., Kirkham Abbey, Whitwell, Yorkshire 

Taylor, Rev. Harrison, M.A., Treeton, Rotherham 

Taylor, James, Esq., J.P., The Hall, Todmorden 

Taylor, John, Esq., Castle Eden, Durham 

Taylor, Rev. Mascie Domville, Lymme Hall, Warrington 

Taylor, Rev. Robert, M.A., Incumbent of Hartlepool 

Taylor, Robert, Esq., Treeton, Rotherham 

Taylor, Thomas, Esq., Dudworth, Barnsley 

Taylor, Thomas, Esq., St. John's, Wakefield 

Taylor, Thomas, Esq., Long Benton, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Taylor, Thomas, Esq., Cricklade, Wilts 

Taylor, Thos.Lambe, Esq., Starston Place, near Harlestone, Norfolk 

Taylor, Rev. W. R., Holt, Norfolk 

Tayton, William, Esq., Pattesley House, near Rougham 

Teal, Henry, Esq., Stourton Lodge, Rothwell, Leeds 

Teale, Edward J., Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Teale, William, Esq., do. do. 

Tee, Charles, Esq., Pindar Oaks, Barnsley 

Teed, Rev. Frederick, B.A., Rector of St. Michael's, Lewes, Sussex 

Teesdale, Christopher, Esq., Sudley Cottage, near Bognor, Sussex 

Teesdale, Symes, and Weston, Messrs., Fenchurch Street, London 

Tempest, Col. J. Plumbe, Tong Hall, Leeds 

Temple, William, Esq., Bishopstrow House, near Warminster 

Templer, James, Esq., Bridport, Dorset 

Templer, Rev. G. H., M.A., Shapwick, Glastonbury, Somerset 

Tench, Rev. John, B.D., Rector of Great Rollright, Oxon 

Tennant, Charles A., Esq., Solicitor, Dewsbury 

Tennant, Rev. Ottiwell, Rector of Upton, Hunts 

TENTERDEN, The Right Honourable Lord 

Terrell, William, Esq., Stoke-under-Hamdon, Yeovil, Somerset 

Terry, Stephen, Esq., Dummer House, Basingstoke 

Tewart, John, Esq., Glanton, Alnwick 

Thew, Edward, jun., Esq., Lesbury House, do. 

Thoburn, James, Esq., Paradise Row, Blyth 

Thomas, Francis Henry, Esq., Hereford 

Thomas Inigo, Esq., Ration, near Eastbourne 

Thomas, William, Esq., MD., Wakefield 

Thomas, Rev. W.P., LL.B., Drake's Place, Wellington, Somerset 

Thompson, Benjamin Blaydes, Esq., Solicitor, Tadcaster 

Thompson, Benjamin, Esq., Park Gate, Guiseley, Leeds 

Thompson, Corden, Esq., M.D., Sheffield 

Thompson, Edward, Esq., Sailer's Hall, London 

Thompson, Rev. F., LL.B., Carham, Coldstream 

Thompson, Rev. F. B., B.A., Eaglescliffe, Yarm 

Thompson, George, Esq., Sunderland 

Thompson, Rev. Sir Hen. , Bart., M. A., Holy Trinity, Fareham, Hants 

Thompson, H. Stafford, Esq., Fairfield, York 



Thompson, James, Esq., Wakefield 
Thompson, John, Esq., Solicitor, Sheffield 
Thompson, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Satley, Wolsingham 
Thompson, Joseph, Esq., Bradford, Yorkshire [upon-Hull 

Thompson, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Incumbent ofMarfleet, Kingston- 
Thompson, Rev. William, B.A., Rector of Addingham, Skipton 
Thompson, William, Esq., Lewes, Sussex 
Thomson, Rev. George Selby, M.A., Rothbury 
Thornely, John, Esq., J.P., Dodworth Green, Barnsley 
Thornhill, Thomas, Esq., Woodleys, Woodstock, Oxon 
Thorns, Joseph, Esq., Green House, Ossett, Wakefield 
Thornton, Stephen, Esq., Moggerhanger House, St. Neot's 
Thorold, Sir John C., Bart., Syston Park, Granlham 
Thorold, Richard, Esq., J.P., Weelsby, Great Grimsby 
Thorold, W. M., Esq., Wigthorpe, Worksop, Notls 
Thorp, Rev. Charles, M.A., Sandford, near Enslone, Oxon 
Thorp, Rev. Henry, M.A., Perpetual Curate of Topsham, Devon 
Thorp, Richard, Esq., Monk Bretlon, Barnsley 
Thorpe, William, Esq., Solicitor, Thome 

Thring, Rev. W. D., D.D., Reclor of Sulton-Veny, Warminster 
Thruston, John, Esq., Weslon Hall, Harling, Norfolk 
Thursfield, Rev. R. P., Beckbury, Shiffnall, Salop 
Thurston and Liddle, Messrs., Newport, Salop 
Thwaite, Samuel, Esq., Woodlands, Halifax 
Thwaites, J. B., Esq., Paradise House, Burnham, Bridgwater 
Tichborne, Sir Henry J., Barl., Tichborne House, Hanls 
Tiffin, Rev. Joseph, M.A., Rainton, Durham 
Tierney, Rev. M.A., Arundel, Sussex 
Timbrell, Charles, Esq., Bradford, Wills 
Timbrell, Thomas, Esq., Shrewton Lodge, Devizes 
Timson, Henry, T. Esq., Tatchbury Mount, Eling, Hanls 
Tindall, John, Esq., J.P., The Cliffe, Scarborough 
Tinker, Uriah, jun., Esq., Benl House, Meltham, Huddersfield 
Tinling, Charles S., Esq., Worthing 
Titchener, Edward, Esq., Chichester 

Todd, Colonel Francis, Victoria Cottage, Shirley, Southampton 
Todd, Rev. James Frederick, Vicar of Liskeard. Cornwall 
Todd, Roberl, Esq., Picton House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Todd, The Venerable Archdeacon, Rector of Settrington, Malton 
Todd, Rev. T., B.A., Holbeck, Leeds 
Toll, Henry L., Esq., Perridge House, Kenn, near Exeler 
Tolson, James, Esq., Mill Hill, Dalton, Huddersfield 
Tolson, Richard, Esq., Ashfield Place, Bradford 
Tomkins, Joshua, Broughton, Hanls 

Tompson, Charles Kelt, Esq., The Hall, Witchingham, Norfolk 
Tonge, Roberl, Esq., Solicitor, Driffield 
Tootall, Mrs. Anne, St. John's, Wakefield 
Toplis, Rev. John, B.D., South Walsham, near Acle, Norfolk 
Torre, Rev. Henry, B.A., Rector of Thornhill, Dewsbury 
Torre, James Whitwell, Esq., Snydale Hall, Pontefracl 
Towle, Benjamin, Esq., Basford, near Notlingham 
Townend, Edward, Esq., Field Head, Denholme, Bradford 
Townsend, Rev. George, College, Durham 
TOWNSHEND, The Righl Honourable Lord James 
Tragell, Rev. T. Heathcote, M.A., Awbridge Danes, Romsey, Hants 
Traviss, John, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 
TREASURY, The Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's 
Trebeck, Rev. Thomas, Rectory, Chailey, near Lewes 
Trenchard, Rev. J. Ashfordby, M.A., Stanlon House, Highworth 
Treslail, John, Esq., Truro, Cornwall 

Trevanion, Rev. Frederick, M.A. Vicar of Wadworlh, Doncaster 
Trevelyan, Rev. John Thomas, Vicar of Milverton, Somerset 
Trevenen, James, Esq., Bosahan, Helston, Cornwall 
Trevor, The Hon. Lieul.-Gen., Glynde Place, near Lewes, Sussex 
Treweeke, Rev. George, lllogan Reclory, Redruth, Cornwall 
Trimmer, Rev. H.Syer, B.A.,Marston-on-Dove, Burton-upon-Trent 
Tripp, Rev. Charles, D.D., Rectory, Sampford-Bretl, near Taunton 
Trocke, Rev. Thos., M.A., Minister of the Chapel Royal, Brighton 
Trotter, Charles, Esq., Mayor of Stockton-upon-Tees 
Trotter, John, Esq., J.P., Staindrop, Durham 
Trotter, John, Esq., Bush, Glencross, Edinburgh 
Trotler, Thomas, Esq., Worthing, Sussex 
Trueman, Rev. Edward, M.A., Langloft, Grimslon, Mallon 
Tuck, Rev. William Gilbert, Curate of Moulton-St. Michael 
Tucker, William, Esq., Corylon House, Axminsler, Devon 
Tuckfield, R. Hippisley, Esq., Fulford Park, Credilon, do. 
Turley, William, Esq., Lane Head House, Yeaden, Leeds 
Turnbull, John, Esq., Solicilor, Haydon-Bridge 
Turner, Rev. Arthur, M.A. , Ladbroke Reclory, Warwickshire 
Turner, Rev. Ed., M.A., Maresfield Rectory, near Uckfield, Sussex 
Turner, Frederick, Esq., Blagdon, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Turner, George, Esq., Ashfield Place, Bradford 
Turner, Rev. Geo. Thos., Rector of Kettleburgh, Suffolk 

c 2 



XXV111 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Turner, Rev. Henry, Chichester, Sussex 

Turner, John, Esq., Crofts, Rotherham 

Turner, John Gilgrass, Esq., Solicitor, Rothwell, Leeds 

Turner, John, Esq., Trowse Hall, near Norwich 

Turner, Messrs. R. and N., Bognor, Sussex 

Turner, Samuel, Esq., 9, Gray's Inn Square, London 

Turner, William, Esq., Solicitor, Hopton, Dewsbury 

Tumor, Christopher, Esq., M.P., Stoke- Hochford, Lincolnshire 

Twiss, Rev. W. C., M.A., Rector of Wrestlingworth, Potton, Beds 

Tyas, John, Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 

Tyner, Rev. William, Vicar of Compton, near Chichester, Sussex 

Tyzack, Benjamin George, Esq., Solicitor, North Shields 

Umphelby, Charles, Esq., Denton House, near Harleston 

Upcher, Rev. Abbot, Kirby-Cane, Bungay, Suffolk 

Upcher, Henry R., Esq., Sheringham Hall, Crorner 

Upperton, Robert, Esq., Lansdowne Place, Brighton 

TJppleby, Charles, Esq., The Hall, Barrow-upon-Humber 

Uppleby, Rev. George, B.A., Vicar of Barton-upon-Humber 

Uppleby, John G., Esq., Park Square, Leeds 

Uppleby, Leadbetter, Esq., Wootton Hall, Barrow-upon-Humber 

Upwood, Rev. Thomas T., Lovell's Hall, Terrington, near Lynn 

Urquhart, Rev. John, M.A., Parsonage, Chapel- A llerton 

Usticke, Rev. R. M. N., Penwarne, TVlawnan, near Falmotith 

Utting, John, Esq., Long Stratton, Norfolk 

Utting, John, Esq., Stanninghall , Norwich 

Vaughan, Rev. John, LL.B., Rector of Upton-Lovell, \\ilts 

Veale, Rev. William, Trevayler, Gulval, Penzance 

Veitch, Rev. W. Douglas, M.A., Sopley Vicarage, Hants 

Vernon Rev. H. John, B.A., Newchurch, Isle of Wight 

Vernon, Rev. Mark Henry, Vicar of VVestfield, Sussex 

Vernon, Robert, Esq., Gateshead 

Verrall, John, Esq., Southover, Lewes, Sussex 

Verrall, William, Esq., do. do. do. 

Vibart, Lieut. James, R.N., Chilliswood, Taunton 

Yickers, Valentine, Esq., Ellerton Grange, Newport, Salop 

Vidler, John, Esq., Rye, Sussex 

Vigers, C. K., Esq.,Truro, Cornwall 

Vilett, Colonel, Swindon, Wilts 

Vincent, Lieut.-Col., Hemsworth, Lane End, Pontefract 

Vollum, William John, Esq., Mayor of Hartlepool, 1842 

Vyner, Rev. Wm. Phillips, M.A., Rector of Withern, Louth 

Waddington, J. H., Esq., Langrish, Petersfield, Hants 

Waddilove, Richard, Esq., Rilstone, Skipton, Craven 

Wade, Rev. Albany, B.A., Rector of Elton, Stocklon-upon-Tees 

Wade, Rev. Garrod, Coney- Weston Lodge, near Thetford 

Wade, John, Esq., Hornsea House, Yorkshire 

Wagstaff, John Reid, Esq., Solicitor, Bradford 

Wailes, William, Esq., Westgate, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Wainhouse, Edward, Esq., Belle Vue, Leeds 

Wainman, Richard Bradley, Esq., J.P., Carhead, Skipton 

VVainwright, Thomas, Esq., Barnsley 

Wait, James, Esq., North Shields 

Waite, Rev. John, M.A., Rector of Tathwell, Louth 

Waites, Rev. J. Bentley, M.A., Vicar of South Stainley, Yorkshiie 

Wake, George Anthony, Esq., Tatchbury Manor House, Hants 

Wake, Rev. Henry, A.M., Rectorof Over- Wallop, Andover, do. 

Wake, William, Esq., Osgathorpe House, Sheffield 

Wakefield Proprietary Grammar School, by Rev. Dr. Fennell 

Wakeford, Joseph, Esq., Andover, Hants 

Wakeman, Thomas, Esq., Graig House, Monmouth 

Wales, John, Esq., Killingworth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Walker, Benjamin, Esq., Cross Hall, Morley; & Water Hall, Leeds 

Walker, Rev. G. A., M.A., Incumbent of Alverthorpe, Wakefield 

Walker, Henry, Esq., Clifton House, Rotherham 

Walker, Henry, Esq., South Parade, Wakefield 

Walker, John, Esq., Wheatleys, Gomcrsal, Leeds 

Walker, Rev. Robert, Vicar of Dunton, Bedfordshire 

Walker, S. H., Esq., Holywell Green, Stainland, Halifax 

Walker, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Dewsbury 

Walker, Thomas, Esq., Ravenfield Park, Rotherham 

Walker, Thomas, Esq., Old Malton 

Walker, William, Esq., Belle Vue, Bradford 

Wallace, Robert, Esq., Town Surveyor, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Wallen, William B., F.S.A., Architect, Huddersfield 

Wallis, Preston, Esq., Bodmin, Cornwall 

Wallis, Robert, Esq., Chapter Row, South Shields 

Wallis, Thomas, Esq., Bent House, do. 

Wallis, William, Esq., Westoe, do. 

WALPOLE, The Right Honourable Lord 

Walton, John, Esq., Horton Street, Halifax 

Walton, Rev. J. Leidger, M.A., Incumbent, of Selby 

Wand, Christopher, Esq., Spring Place, Bradford 

Walthew, William, Esq., Clarence Cottage, Hayling, Hants 



Warburton, Rev. R., M.A., Rector of Holtby, Yorkshire 

Ward, Rev. Edward, Haughley, Stowmarket 

Ward, Rev. E., Langton,M.A.,Oxon, Rectorof Blendworth, Hants 

Ward, J. A., Esq., Crockerton, near Warminster 

Ward, Mr. Joseph, Tixall Farm, Stafford 

Ward, Rich. M., Esq., Brandon, Suffolk, and Matlock, Derbyshire 

Ward, Robert, Escj., Sal ho use Hall, near Norwich 

Warde, R.ev. William, M.A., Witton-le-Wear, Durham 

Wardell, Rev. Henry, M.A., Rector of Winlaton, do. 

Ware, Rev. Henry, St. Ladoca Parsonage, near Truio, Cornwall 

Ware, Rev. James, Vicar of Wyverstone, Stowmarket 

Ware, W. J., Esq., Skirpenbeck, Yorkshire 

Waring, Rev. William, M.A., Itchen, Southampton 

Warne, James, Esq., Solicitor, Basiugstoke 

Warner, Rev. A. N., Wymbndham 

Warner, Rev. G. Townsend, B.A., Incumbent of St. Paul's, Leeds 

Warner, Rev. Richard, Rector of Chelwood, Somerset 

Warre, Rev. F., LL.D., Rectory, Cheddon-Fitzpaine, Taunton 

Warren, Rev. T., Alston, B.D., Rectorof South Warnborough, Hants 

Warren, Rev. Z. S., M.A., Vicar of Ancaster, Grantham 

Warriner, E. Esq., Manor House, Conock, near Devizes 

Warry, Miss, Shapwick, Glastonbury, Somerset 

Warry, George, Esq., Sherborne, Dorset 

Warter, Rev. John Wood, Vicarage, West Tarring, Worthing, Sussex 

Wasney, John Wilkinson, Esq., Fence End, Skipton 

Waterhouse, J., Esq., Well Head, Halifax 

Waters, Robert, Esq., Arminghall, near Norwich 

Waterworth, H., Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight 

Watherston, Rev. P. John, M.A., Charlton-Horethorne, Somerset 

Walkin, William, Esq., Cleatlam, Staindrop 

Watkius, Rev. Henry, B.A. & J.P., Vicar of Silkstone, Barnsley 

Watkins, R., Esq., Tower House, Arundel, Sussex 

Watson, Cuthbert, Esq., Ovington, Barnard-Castle 

Watson, Rev. George, M.A., Vicar of Caistor, Lincoln 

Watson, John, Esq., Burnopfield House, Gateshead 

Watson, John, Esq., Solicitor, Pickering 

Watson, Rev. John, DD., Ringstead, North Hants 

Watson, Rev. J. D., Guilsborough, Northampton 

Watson, Rev. Joseph Spencer, Westbury, Wilts 

Watson, Hon. Richard, Rockingham Castle, Northamptonshire 

Watson, William, Esq., Spring Lodge, Barnard-Castle 

Watt, Francis, jun., Esq., Beverley 

Watt, Richard, Esq., Bishop Burton, do. 

Watts, Capt. Geo. Edward, R.N., Langton Grange, Darlington 

Watts, Rev. George, Ewhurst, near Battle, Sussex 

Watts, William, Esq., Solicitor, Dewsbury f burgh 

Wauchope, Andrew, Esq., Niddrie, Marischall, Liberton, Edin- 

W r augh, Alexander, Esq., North Earle, W r ooler 

Wayland, Rev. Charles, Stratton Rectory, Old Down, Somerset 

Wealleans, Christopher, Esq., Flotterton House, Rothbury 

W r eatherhead, Samuel, Esq. .Solicitor, Bingley 

Weatherley, Capt. James Dent, 60th Rifles, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Webb, Charles H., Esq., Forebridge Hall, Stafford 

Webb, Joseph A., Esq., Stowmarket, Suffolk 

Webb, Joseph C., Esq., Park Place, Hempnall, Long Stratton 

Webb, Matthew, Esq., Bank House, Ketley, near Wellington 

Webb, Thomas, Esq., Nutall House, Barton-under-Needwood 

Webb, Rev. William, M.A-, Rectorof Sunderland 

Webber, George Wood, Esq., Hexworthy, Lawhitton, Cornwall 

Webster, Mrs. John, Springfield House, Morley, Leeds 

Webster, Joseph, Esq., Old Hall, do. do. 

Webster, Mrs. Samuel, Bank House, do. do. 

Weddall, Thomas M., Esq., Solicitor, Selby 

Weekes, George, Esq., Hurst-Pierrepoint, Sussex 

Weightman, Hugh, Esq., Mitre Court Buildings, Temple, London 

Weir, Archibald, Esq., Coopers' Hall, London 

Welby, Rev. M. E., Rctor of Long Bennington, Grantham 

Welch, Henry, Esq., Civil Engineer, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Weld, James, Esq., Archers' Lodge, Southampton 

Welfitt, William Teale, Esq., J.P., Manby Hall, Louth 

Wells, Henry, Esq., Midhurst, Sussex 

Wells, Nathaniel, Esq., Piercefield, Chepstow, Monmouth 

Wells, William Harrison, Esq., Dilham Mills, Worstead, Norfolk 

Wells, William, Esq., Park Place, Bradford 

Wenman, The Baroness, Thame Park, Oxon 

Wentworth, F. W. T. Vernou, Esq., Wentworth Castle, Barnsley 

Were, Rev. Ellis Bowden, M.A., Vicar of Chipping- Norton, Oxon 

West, Frederick R., Esq., Arnewood House, Lymington 

West, John, Esq., St. Faith's Abbey, near Norwich 

West, John, Esq., Breckle's Hall, near Watton 

Westell, James, Esq., Witney, Oxon 

Westerman, George H., Esq., Castle Grove, Sandal, W T akefield 

Westgarth, George, Esq., Alum-Works, Boulby, Guisborough 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



XXIX 



Westmorland, Joseph Williamson, Esq., South Parade, Wakefield 
Westmorland, Rev. T., M.A., Vicar of Sandal-Magna, do. 
Wetherall, Rev. John, Rector of Rushton, Kettering 
Whaites, John Johnson, Esq., Ingham House, near Stalham 
Whall, John, Esq., Solicitor, Worksop 

Whateley, Rev. C., M.A., Rector of Rise, Kingston-upou-Hull 
Whatley, David, Esq., Golden Farm, Cirencester 
Wheat, James, Esq., Norwood Hall, Sheffield 
Wheatley, Charles, Esq., Sands House, Hopton, Dewsbury 
Wheatley, Francis, Esq., Mundsley, near North Walsham, Norfolk 
Wheatley, J. Flint, Esq., Woodlands, Hopton, Dewsbury 
Wheatley, Matthew, jun., Esq. .Shield Field, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Wheatley, T., Esq., J.P., Cote Walls, Hopton, Mirfield, Dewsbury 
Wheatley, William, Esq., Royds House, do. do. 
Wheeler, Rev. Wm., B.D., Fellow of Magdalene College, Oxford 
Wheldon, Thomas, Esq., Solicitor, Barnard- Castle 
Wheler, Rev. H. Trevor, M.A., Berkley Rectory, Frome, Somerset 
Whichcote, Sir T., Bart., Aswarby Park, Falkingham, Lincolnshire 
Whitacre, John, Esq., Wood House, Huddersfield 
Whitaker, Alfred, Esq., Frome, Somersetshire 
Whitaker, Frederick, Esq., Bampton, Oxon 
Whitaker, Rev. G. H., M.A., Vicar of Garforth, Leeds 
Whitaker, James, Esq., Bramham, Tadcaster 
Whitaker, Jonas, Esq., J.P., Greenholme, Otley 
Whitaker, Joshua, Esq., Ossett, Wakefield 
White, David B., Esq., M.D., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
White, Capt. Frederick, Saxby Hall, Barton-upon-Humber 
White, Rev. James, B.A., Wood Lynch, Bonchurch, Isle of Wight 
White, James, Esq., Wooldringfold, Horsham, Sussex 
White, Rev. J. Neville, B.D., Rector of Tivetshall, Norfolk 
White, John, Esq., Upper Wood House, Rawdon, Leeds 
White, John, Esq., Warden of Whixley Hospital, York 
White, Joseph, Esq., Anfield House, Romsey, Hants 
White, Robert, Esq., Woodhouse Grove, Leeds 
White, Thomas W., Esq., Nursling, Southampton 
White, Rev. William, M.A., Vicar of Stradbroke, Suffolk 
White, William Lambert, Esq., Yeovil, Somerset 
Whitehead, John, Esq., Cambridge 

Whitehead, Matthias, Esq., J.P., The Crescent, Selby [worth 

Whitehead, Ralph Radcliffe, Esq., Royal George Mills, Saddle- 
Whiteley, John Denton, Esq., Stainland, Halifax 
Whiteley & Sons, Messrs. John, Calder Side, Hebden-Bridge 
Whitfield, Edward, Esq., Elswick Villa, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 
Whitfield, William, Esq., Solicitor, Rotherham 
Whitham, Joseph, Esq., Kirkstall, Leeds 
Whitley, Edward, Esq., West Coker, Yeovil, Somerset 
Whitmore, Rev. Ainslie H., Leasingham Rectory, Sleaford 
Whitmore, Thomas, Esq., Apley Park, Bridgenorth, Salop 
Wickham, James, Esq., Sutton-Scotney House, Whitchurch 
Wickham, Rev. Robert, M.A., Twyford, Winchester 
Wickham, William, Esq., Bullington House, Whitchurch 
Wickham, William, Esq., Winchester 
Wicksted, Charles, Esq., Shakenhurst, Cleobury-Mortimer 
Wilberforce, William, Esq., Oriel College, Oxford 
Wilby, John, Esq., Solicitor, Wakefield, Yorkshire [terfield 

Wilcocks, Rev. W. Wright, M.A., Incumbent of Ridgeway, Ches- 
Wild, Rev. William Taylor, B.D., Vicar of Westow, Whitwell 
Wilde, Rev. Spencer D., Fletching, near Uckfield, Sussex 
Wilkins, Rev. Edw., M.A., Rector of Hempstead, Stalham, Norfolk 
Wilkinson, Rev. C., M.A., Vicar of Bardsey, Wetherby 
Wilkinson, Rev. H. T., Weston Rectory, Harling, Norfolk 
Wilkinson, John Etridge, Esq., Dunston Lodge, GatesheaH 
Wilkinson, Rev. Marmaduke, M.A., Redgrave Rectory, Botesdale 
Wilkinson, Rev. Wm. Hutton, M.A., Incumb. of All Saints, Portsea 
Wilkinson, William, Esq., Brow Bridge, Elland, Halifax 
Wilkinson, Rev. W. G., Bubwith Vicarage, Howden 
Wilks, John, Esq., Solicitor, Dewsbury 
Willan, Robert, jun., Esq., Solicitor, Barnsley 
Willan, Whaley, Esq., Solicitor, Bentham, Lancaster 
Willders, J. W., Esq., Chesterton House, Stilton 
Willebois, H., Esq., Marham House, near Downham-Market 
Williams, Rev. E., B.A., Perpetual Curate of Linfield and Ascot 
Williams, Rev.H. J., Vicar of Buckland-Denham, Somerset 
Williams, Rev. James P., Sidlesham, near Chichester, Sussex 
Williams, John, Esq., Burncooso, Truro, Cornwall 
Williams, John, Esq., Retley Hill, Wellington, Salop 
Williams, John, Esq., M.D., Beverley [Hull 

Williams, Rev. Preston J., M.A., Sigglesthorne, Kingston-upon- 
Williams, Rev. Stephen, Magor, Newport, Monmouth 
Williams, William, Esq., Hallatrow, near Bath, Somerset 
Williamson, Captain, Crawley, Hants 

Williamson, Rev. R. H., M.A., Incumbent of Holy Trinity, Dar- 
Willington, John S., Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight [lington 

VOL. I. 



Willis, George, Esq., Sopley Park, Ringwood, Hants 

Willoby, W. & E., Messrs., Solicitors, Berwick-upon-Tweed 

Willoughby, Henry, Esq., Birdsall Hall, Malton 

Willson, John, Esq., Quarry House, Northowram, Halifax 

Wilson, Benjamin, Esq., Bank House, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Wilson, Frederick W., Esq., Solicitor, Sheffield 

Wilson, George, Esq., M.D., Alnwick 

Wilson, George St. V., Esq., Redgrave Hall, near Botesdale 

Wilson, Henry, Esq., Solicitor, Alford 

Wilson, Henry, Esq., Stowlangtoft Hall, near Ixworth, Suffolk 

Wilson, Sir Isaac, Knt., and M.D., Fareham, Hants 

Wilson, J., Esq., Solicitor, Goole 

Wilson, James William, Esq., Solicitor, Louth 

Wilson, John, Esq., Union Bank, Huddersfield 

Wjlson, Joseph, Esq., Clifford, Sheffield 

Wilson, Joseph Radcliffe, Esq., Solicitor, Stockton-upon-Tees 

Wilson, Knowlton, Esq., M.D., Sheffield 

Wilson, R., jun., Esq., Solicitor, Hartlepool 

Wilson, Rev. Samuel, M.A., Vicar of Warter, Pocklington 

Wilson, Rev. Thomas, M.A., Incumbent of Walton, Wetherby 

Wilson, Thomas, Esq., Merchant, Kingston-on-Hull 

Wilson, Thomas, Esq., Hornsea, Yorkshire 

Wilson, Thomas, Esq., Shotley Hall, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Wilson, Thomas, Esq., Fell House, Gateshead Low Fell 

Wilson, Thomas, Esq., Birkby House, Huddersfield 

Wilson, Major Thomas, Titchfield, Hants 

Wilson, Rev. T. D. Holt, Rector of Hinderclay, near Botesdale 

Wilson, Rev. William, M.A., Incumbent of Ryhope, Sunderland 

Wilson, W. Murray, Esq., Horsforth, Leeds 

Wilson, Rev. William, Palgrave Rectory, near Diss, Norfolk 

Wilson, Rev. William, D.D., Vicar of Holy-Rood 

Wimble, Nehemiah, Esq., Lewes, Sussex 

Windham, W. H., Esq., Felbrigg Hall, Norfolk 

Winearls, R. G., Esq., Marham, near Downham-Market 

Wing, Rev. Wm. M.A., Rector of Stibbington, Wansford, Hunts 

Winn, Charles, Esq., J.P., Nostal Priory, Wakefield 

Winn, Joseph, Esq., Newlay House, Leeds 

Winnington, Rev. Francis, Rectory House, near Bromyard 

Winpenny, Rev. J., Incumbent of Yarm 

Winsloe, Rev. Richard, Wilton, Taunton, Somerset 

Winslow, John, Esq., Lashlake, Thame 

Winstanley, Rev. J. Robinson, D.D., Vicar of Bampton, Oxon 

Winterbottom, Thomas M., Esq., M.D., Westoe, South Shields 

W1NTERTON, The Right Honourable the Earl of 

Wise, Rev. John Henry, Stradbrooke, Suffolk 

Wiseman, William Wood, Esq., Ossett, Wakefield 

Witham, H. T. M., Esq., J.P., Lartington Hall, Barnard- Castle 

Wither, Rev. Harris Jervois Bigg, M.A., Worting Rectory, Hants 

Wither, Rev. Lovelace Bigg, M. A., Tangier Park, do. 

Wither, Rev. William Bigg, B.C.L., Otterbourne, do. 

Withers, William, Esq., Church House, Holt, Norfolk 

WODEHOUSE, The Right Honourable Lord 

Wodehouse, Edmund, Esq., M.P., Bracondale, near Norwich 

Wollaston, Rev. W. C., Rector of East Dereham, Norfolk 

Wollen, Rev. J., Bridgwater, Somerset 

Wollocombe, Rev. John, M.A., Rector of Stowford, Cornwall 

Wonham, Mr. W. K., Bognor, Sussex 

Wood, Charles Thorold, Esq., Campsall Park, Doncaster 

Wood, George, Esq., Morston Hall, Blakeney, Norfolk 

Wood, Rev. John A., M.A., Beadnell, Belford 

Wood, John, Esq., Thedden Grange, Alton, Hants 

Wood, John, Esq., Woodlands, Darlington 

Wood, Joseph, Esq., Woolley Moor, Wakefield 

Wood, Joseph, Esq., Sandal , do. 

Wood, Rev. Peter, Rector of Broadwater, near Worthing, Sussex 

Wood, Thomas, Esq., Arthingworth, Northamptonshire 

Wood, William, Esq., Mayor of Pontefract in 1841 

Wood, William Cole, Esq., Martock, Somerset 

Woodd, Bazil T., Esq., J.P., Aldborough Lodge, Boroughbridge 

Woodall, Henry, Esq., North Dallon, Beverley 

Woodall, John, Esq., J.P., The Crescent, Scarborough 

Woodall, William Edward, Esq., Solicitor, Scarborough 

Woodhams, William R., Esq., Hammond's House, Udimore, Rye 

Woodhead, William Wright, Esq., Solicitor, Sheffield 

Woodman, William, Esq., Town Clerk of Morpeth 

Woodroffe, Rev. T.,M.A., Oxon, Rector of Calbourne, Isleof Wight 

Woods, James, Esq., Stowmarket, Suffolk 

Woods, Miss, Shopwyke, near Chichester, Sussex 

Woods, William, Esq., Newcastle-upon-Tyne 

Woodward, Rev.Thos., M.A., Hopton-Wafers, Cleobury-Mortimer 

Wooldridge and Son, Messrs., Winchester, Hants 

Wordsworth, Rev. William, B.A., Monk Bretton, Barnsley 

Workman, Rev. William, A.M., Rector of Eastrop, Basingstoke 

d 



XXX 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Wormakl, Frank, Esq., Field Head, Mirfield, Dewsbury 

Wormald, Henry, Esq., South Parade, Wakefield 

Wormald, Percival, Esq., Moor Lane, Gomersal, Leeds 

Wormald, Smith, Esq., Tickton Grange, Beverley 

Wormald, William, Esq., Solicitor, Leeds 

Worsley, Charles C. Seymour, Esq., Newport, Isle of Wight 

Worsley, Rev. Charles, M. A., Oxon, do. do. 

Worsley, Rev. Henry, D.D., Oxon, Rector of Gatcombe, do. 

Worsley, Rev. Ferryman, M.A., Rector of Little Ponton, Grantham 

Worsley, Thomas, Esq., Cubley, Penistone, Barnsley 

Worsley, Sir William, Bart., Hovingham Hall, Whitwell 

Worsop, John Arthur, Esq., Landford House, Wilts 

Wrench, Rev. J. G., D.C.L., Salehurst Vicarage, Sussex 

Wright, Chas., Esq., Mattishall Burgh Cottage, near East Dereham 

Wright, Mrs. E., Feniton, nearHoniton, Devon 

Wright, Francis Bowcher, Esq., Hinton-Blewett, near Bath 

Wright, Francis, Esq., Revell Grange, Stannington, Sheffield 

Wright, Ichabod, Esq., Mapperley, Nottinghamshire 

Wright, James, Esq., Ravenhill, near Rugeley, StafFordshiie 

Wright, James, Esq., Blyth, Northumberland 

Wright, John Francis, Esq., Kelvedon Hall, Ongar, Essex 

Wright, Joshua Collett, Esq., Beckwith House, Harrogate 

Wright, R., Esq., Dep.-Lieut., Sands House, Rushyford, Durham 

Wright, Rev. R. J. W., M.A., Winchester, Hants 

Wright, Thomas G., Esq., M.D., South Parade, Wakefield 

Wright, William, Esq., Silsden, Keighley 

Wright, Rev. W., B.A., Principal of the College, Huddersfield 

Wrigley, Thomas, Esq., Waterloo Villa, Halifax 



Wyatt, Hugh P., Esq., Cissbury, near Worthing 

Wyatt, Rev. Thomas, North Lodge, Worthing 

Wylam, William, Esq., Prospect Cottage, Gateshead 

Wyld, Rev. Thomas, Rector of North Wraxall, Chippenham 

Wylie, Robert, Esq., J.P., Beverley 

Wymer, Rev. Edward, Rector of Westwick, Norfolk 

Wynch, Rev. Henry, Rector of Pett, near Winchelsea, Sussex 

Wyndi.am, Col. George, Petworth Park, Petworth, do. 

Wythe, Thomas, Esq., Manor House, Middleton, near Lynn 

Yaldwyn, Mrs. JV1., Blackdown House, near Petworth, Sussex 

YARBOROUGH, The Right Honourable the Earl of 

Yard, Thomas, Esq., Bucklands, Ryde, Isle of Wight 

Yarker, Rev. Luke, M.A. & J.P., Vicar of Chillingham, Belford 

Yate, Rev. Charles, B.D., Vicar of Holme-on-Spalding-Moor, 

Yates, James, Esq., Barbot Hall, Rotherham [Market- Weighton 

Yates, Rev. H. S., Henlow, Biggleswade, Bedfordshire 

Yates, R. B., Esq., Ballard Lodge, Alverstoke, Hants 

Yeatman, Rev. H. F., Stock House, Dorset 

Yerbury, Francis, Esq., Belcomb House, Bradford, Wilts 

Yewdall, William, Esq., Buxton House, Rawdon, Leeds 

YORK, His Grace the Lord Archbishop of 

York, E., Esq., J.P., Wighill Park, Tadcaster [London 

Yorke, the Hon. Eliot Thomas, M.P., Norfolk Street, Park Lane, 

Yorke.The Hon. & Rev. Grantham, M.A., Edinburgh 

Young. James, Esq., West Docks, South Shields [Spring 

Young, Rev. J., D.D., Master of the Kepier School, Houghton-le- 

Young, Thomas, Esq., Northumberland Square, North Shields 

ZETLAND, The Right Honourable the Earl of 



TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY 



OF 



ENGLAND. 



ABBE 

ABBAS-COMBE, or TEMPLE-COMBE (ST. MARY), a 
parish, in the union of WINCANTON, hundred of HORE- 
THORNE, E. division of SOMERSET, 4^ miles (S. by W.) 
from Wincanton, on the road to Blandford ; containing 
461 inhabitants. It derived the name of Temple-Combe 
from the military order of Knights Templars, who had 
an establishment here, which at the dissolution possessed 
a revenue of 128. 7- 9- The parish comprises by 
measurement 1884 acres of land, and contains good 
building stone of the granite species, and limestone, 
both of which are quarried. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 9- 9. 4^., and in the 
gift of the Rev. Thomas Fox : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent- charge of 370, and the glebe con- 
sists of 38 acres. The church exhibits the unusual 
spectacle of a tower on the south side of the nave. 
There is a place of worship for Independents ; and two 
schools are supported chiefly by subscription. Some 
remains of the chapel attached to the old priory-house 
are still to be seen. 

ABBERBURY, county SALOP. See ALBERBURY. 

ABBERLEY (Sr. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of HARTLEY, Lower division of the hundred of DOD- 
DINGTREE, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the 
county of WORCESTER, 4^ miles (W. S. W.) from Stour- 
portj containing 559 inhabitants. There are 2564 
acres in the parish, the surface of which is well watered 
by numerous brooks, and the soil is rather above the 
average in fertility. The village is situated to the right 
of the road leading from Worcester to Ludlow, in a 
valley surrounded by hills whose summits afford delight- 
ful prospects ; the declivities are laid out in sheep- 
walks, and enriched with thriving plantations. Coal 
of excellent quality is worked to a considerable extent ; 
and some limestone is found in the neighbourhood. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
11. 10. 2^., and in the gift of H. Bromley, Esq. : the 
incumbent's tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
VOL. I. 1 



ABBE 

charge of 333. 8. 6., and those of the impropriators 
for one of 100. A school was founded under grants 
by Elizabeth and Victoria Walsh, in 1717, and has an 
income of 15 per annum, in addition to a house and 
garden ; and there is also an infants' school. William 
Walsh, the poet, and a correspondent of Pope and 
Addison, was born here, in 1663. 

ABBERLOFT, a hamlet, in the parish of WIL- 
LOUGHBY, union of SPILSBY, Wold division of the hun- 
dred of CALCEWORTH, parts of LINDSEY, county of 
LINCOLN ; containing 23 inhabitants. 

ABBERTON (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of LEXDEN and WINSTREE, hundred of WINSTREE, 
N. division of ESSEX, 4^ miles (S.) from Colchester ; 
containing 248 inhabitants. It is situated about a mile 
and a half to the east of the river Colne, and com- 
prises by measurement 1067 acres. There are some 
gravel-pits, which afford good materials for repairing the 
roads ; and chalk can be obtained at a distance of three 
miles, being brought by vessels into the Strode of 
Mersea island. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 14. 7- 8^., and in the patronage of 
the Crown : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 300, and there are 50 acres of glebe. The 
church is a small neat building, on an elevated site, 
with a square tower of brick. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans ; and a day school for girls is 
supported by subscription. 

ABBERTON, a parish, in the union, and Upper di- 
vision of the hundred of PERSHORE, Pershore and E. 
divisions of the county of WORCESTER, 7 miles (N. E. 
by N.) from Pershore ; containing 8 1 inhabitants. This 
parish, bounded on the south by a branch of the river 
Piddle, comprises 990 acres, of which nearly one-half is 
fine pasture land, much esteemed for its dairy produce. 
The hall is a large structure, commanding a beautiful 
panoramic view of the eastern part of the county. The 
living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books 

B 



A B B O 



A B BO 



at 5. 8. 1|., and in the patronage of the Sheldon 
family; net income, 161. Here is a mineral spring, 
the water of which is bitter and cathartic, being some- 
what similar to that at Cheltenham. 

ABBERWICK, a township, in the parish of EDLING- 
HAM, union of ALNWICK, N. division of CoauETDALE 
ward and of NORTHUMBERLAND, 4 miles (W.) from 
Alnwick ; containing 170 inhabitants. It includes the 
north-eastern part of the parish, adjoining Alnwick 
moor; and near it runs the river Aln, which is here 
joined by the Lemmingtoii brook. 

ABBEY, a tything, in the parish, union, and hun- 
dred of AXMINSTER, Honiton and S. divisions of 
DEVON ; containing 76 inhabitants. 

ABBEY-LANDS, a township, in the parish and 
union of ALNWICK, E. division of COQUETDALE ward, 
N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND ; containing 2Q5 inha- 
bitants. Heckley House belongs to Josh. Hewitson, Esq. 

ABBOTS-ANN (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of ANDOVER, partly in the hundred of WHERWELL, but 
chiefly in that of ANDOVER, Andover and N. divi- 
sions of HANTS, 2^ miles (S. W. by W.) from Andover ; 
containing 619 inhabitants. This place anciently be- 
longed to Hyde abbey, Winchester, in the earliest rolls 
of which it is noticed as the manor of Anna, and in later 
ones as Abbottes Anne. In a field, about a mile to the 
south-east of the church, were discovered a few years 
since the remains of what is believed to have been a 
Roman villa, from the pavement found there, and from 
its vicinity to Dunbury Hill. Some, however, have 
imagined them to be the ruins of a monastery, as the 
field is still called Monaster Field, and the opinion is 
favoured by the names of this and the neighbouring 
village of Monkston. At the beginning of the eighteenth 
century, the property passed by purchase into the Pitt 
family, by one of whom, Governor Pitt (who brought 
the Pitt diamond into Europe), the church was rebuilt. 
The parish comprises about 3000 acres, and is inter- 
sected by the Salisbury and great western road ; a canal 
from Andover to Southampton passes within a mile. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
42. 17. 6., and in the patronage of Miss Burrough : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
790, and there are about 50 acres of glebe, and a 
good glebe-house. The church is a substantial brick 
edifice relieved with stone, with a handsome tower. 
There is a place of worship for Independents ; and a 
school is supported by the rector. 

ABBOT S-ASTLEY. See ASTLEY, ABBOT'S. And 
all places having a similar distinguishing prefix will be found 
under the proper name. 

ABBOTSBURY (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish (formerly 
a market-town), in the union of WEYMOUTH, hundred 
of UGGSCOMBE, Dorchester division of DORSET, 8^ 
miles (W. S. W.) from Dorchester, and 129 (S. W. by W.) 
from London ; containing, with the hamlets of Rodden 
and Elworth, 1005 inhabitants. The name of this 
place is evidently derived from its ancient possessors, 
the abbots of the monastery of St. Peter, which is sup- 
posed to have been founded in 1044, by Orcus, or Ork- 
ing, steward of the household of Canute the Great, and 
Tola his wife, for monks of the Benedictine order. 
According to the register of the abbey it appears that 
a church was erected here at a very early period, by 
Bertulphus, a priest, and dedicated to St. Peter. This 



having afterwards become a place of retreat for the 
West Saxon kings, and the territory having come into 
the possession of Canute, lands to a considerable extent 
were given by him to Orcus, by whom and Tola, or 
Thole, dying without issue, they were subsequently 
granted to the church of St. Peter, built a long time 
previously, and then forsaken and in decay, on account 
of its having been frequently infested by pirates. Orcus 
erected the monastery, which occupied a large extent of 
ground, and, in progress of time, was endowed with rich 
grants and divers immunities, and was frequently re- 
built : the remains consist of a gateway and portions 
of the walls. Its revenue, at the dissolution, was esti- 
mated at 485. 3. 5. : it was granted to Sir Giles Strange- 
ways, and on its site was erected a mansion, which, 
having been garrisoned for the king, in 1644, was at- 
tacked by Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper, and burnt to 
the ground. The church was also occupied by a party 
of royalists, who surrendered before it sustained any 
damage. 

The TOWN, situated in a valley surrounded by lofty 
hills, near the sea-shore, consists of three streets, partially 
paved, and is well supplied with water : the western 
part of it was consumed by fire in 1706. Fishing is 
the chief occupation of the inhabitants, great quan- 
tities of mackerel being taken on the coast. The weav- 
ing of cotton was introduced here about thirty years 
since, but has of late much declined. The market, 
which has fallen into disuse, was held on Thursday, 
and was granted, together with two fairs, to Sir John 
Strangeways in the 8th of James I., a former market, 
granted to one of the abbots, and held on Friday, 
having been long discontinued. One of the fairs has 
also been discontinued; the other, which is for sheep 
and toys, is held on the 10th of July. The LIVING is 
a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
10; net income, 140; patron and impropriator, the 
Earl of Ilchester, whose tithes have been commuted for 
a rent-charge of 127. 10. The church is a large hand- 
some structure, in the later style of English architecture, 
with a square embattled tower, and is thought to have 
contained the remains of the founder of the abbey and 
his wife, which were removed hither from the conventual 
church at the dissolution. A school, originally founded 
for twenty boys, was further endowed in 1754, by Mrs. 
Horner, with 21 per annum, for instructing ten addi- 
tional boys ; and a charity school, for clothing and 
educating twenty girls, is supported by the Countess of 
Ilchester, who has also established an infants' school. 
St. Catherine's chapel, supposed to have been erected 
in the reign of Edward IV., stands on an eminence south- 
west of the town, and serves only as a land-mark : it is 
built wholly of freestone dug out of the hill on which it 
is situated ; the roof is finely groined, and on each side 
is a handsome porch. About a mile and a half to the 
west of Abbotsbury is an ancient intrenchment occupy- 
ing an area of nearly 20 acres ; and near the town is a 
cromlech. 

ABBOTSHAM (ST. HELEN), a parish, in the union 
of BIDEFORD, hundred of SHEBBEAR, Great Torrington 
and N. divisions of DEVON, 2 miles (W.) from Bideford ; 
containing, with the hamlets of Shepperton and Little- 
ham, 414 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated 
on the shore of Barnstaple Bay, is distinguished for a 
memorable victory over the Danes, who besieged the 



A BBO 



A B ER 



fortress, called Kenwith or Kenwic Castle, towards the 
close of the ninth century, on which occasion their 
main western army was routed, and 1 C 200 of them, in- 
cluding their leader, slain, and their consecrated standard 
captured. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in 
the king's books at 16. 4. 7-; it is in the patronage 
of the Crown, and the owners and occupiers of land are 
the impropriators. The great tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 32. 10., and the vicarial for 
120 ; and there are nearly 34 acres of glebe. A 
school is partly supported by the principal proprietor of 
land, the vicar, and the curate. 

ABBOT-SIDE, HIGH, a township, in the parish 
of AYSGARTH, wapentake of HANG-WEST, N. riding of 
YORK, l mile (N. W. by W.) from Hawes ; containing, 
with the chapelries of Hardraw and Helbeck-Lunds, 
and the hamlets of Cotterdale, Fosdale, Litherskew, 
Sedbusk, Shaw, and Simonstone, 574 inhabitants. The 
two townships of Abbot- Side received their names from 
the monks of Jervaulx abbey, who had a settlement and 
considerable property in the district. This township, 
which comprises by computation 13,000 acres, is al- 
together wild and mountainous, and consists of moors, 
dales, and ravines ; it is rich in springs, waterfalls, 
rocks, and caves, and a variety of interesting natural 
curiosities ; and the magnificent cataract called Hardraw 
Scarr, 102 feet in height, with its stupendous rocks and 
romantic caverns, and the elevation of Shunner Fell, 2329 
feet above the level of the sea, and commanding exten- 
sive views of several counties, are both situated in the 
township. The river Ure, on which are several beauti- 
ful waterfalls, rises at the head of the valley. A rent- 
charge of 163 has been awarded to Trinity College, 
Cambridge, as a commutation in lieu of the impropriate 
tithes. 

ABBOT-SIDE, LOW, a township, in the parish of 
AYSGARTH, wapentake of HANG-WEST, N. riding of 
YORK ; containing, with the hamlets of Grange, Bow- 
bridge, Helme, and Shawcote, 166 inhabitants. This 
place is on the north side of the river Ure, and com- 
prises by computation about 5000 acres of land : Whit- 
field Gill, in which is the picturesque waterfall called 
Whitfield Force, separates the township from that of 
Askrigg. Here the monks of Jervaulx abbey were first 
seated, and afterwards maintained a cell. The impro- 
priate tithes have been commuted for a rent- charge of 
42, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. Two poor 
widows of the place, and four others from Askrigg, 
are eligible to the almshouses at Grange, founded and 
endowed by Christopher Alderson, in 1807. 

ABBOTSLEY (ST. MARGARET), a parish, in the 
union of ST. NEOT'S, hundred of TOSELAND, county of 
HUNTINGDON, 4^ miles (S. E.) from St. Neot's ; contain- 
ing 443 inhabitants. It comprises about 1700 acres, 
and is bounded by a brook formed by the draining of 
the adjacent lands, and which, passing onward between 
three and four miles, discharges itself into the river 
Ouse at St. Neot's. The pillow-lace manufacture affords 
employment to the female population. The living is 
a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
8. 17. ; net income, 85 ; patrons and impropriators, 
Master and Fellows of Balliol College, Oxford. The 
glebe consists of 185 acres, of which 125 were allotted 
to the vicar in lieu of the small tithes on the inclosure 
of the waste lands in 1837 3 the glebe-house has been 
3 



rebuilt. The church is an ancient edifice, consisting of 
a nave, chancel, two aisles, and a tower at the west end, 
with a north and south porch, a west entrance through 
the tower, and a chancel door ; it is supposed to have 
been erected between the accessions of William Rufus 
and Edward III., and was thoroughly repaired in 1837. 
A Roman road once passed along the western boundary 
of the parish, and in its track coins of the Roman 
emperors are occasionally found. Dr. Abbott, father of 
the Rt. Hon. Charles Abbott, speaker of the house of 
commons, subsequently created Lord Colchester, was 
vicar here in the reign of George II. 

ABBOTSTON (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
ALRESFORD, hundred of BOUNTISBOROUGH, Winches- 
ter and N. divisions of HANTS, 2f miles (N. W.) from 
New Alresford. The living is a rectory, united to the 
vicarage of Itchin-Stoke, and valued in the king's books 
at 13. 6. 8. : the church is in ruins. Here are the re- 
mains of some religious house, of which there is no 
authentic account. 

ABDASTON (ST. MARGARET), a parish, in the 
union of NEWPORT, N. division of the hundred of 
PIREHILL and of the county of STAFFORD, 4 miles (W. 
by S.) from Eccleshall ; comprising the townships of 
Abdaston, Bishop's Offlow, Flashbrook and Tunstall, 
and the hamlet of Knighton, and containing 610 in- 
habitants, of which number 39 are in the township of 
Abdaston. It consists of about 4000 acres, divided into 
nearly equal portions of arable and pasture, with a small 
quantity of woodland. The living is a perpetual curacy, 
in the patronage of the Dean of Lichfield, the appro- 
priator; net income, 100. The tithes have been com- 
muted for 562. 10. per annum, and the incumbent 
receives a rent-charge of 2. 1Q. In 1724, John Wright 
bequeathed a small portion of land for the support and 
education of the poor; and, in 1764, Richard Whit- 
worth gave a house and land for similar purposes. 

ABDON (ST. MARGARET), a parish, in the union of 
LXJDLOW, hundred of MXJNSLOW, S. division of SALOP, 
12 miles (S. W. by W.) from Bridgenorth ; containing 
155 inhabitants. It comprises upwards of 1100 acres, 
of which about 190 are arable, 664 meadow and pasture, 
and 260 waste land ; the surface is very irregular, and 
the soil strong red clay in the higher grounds, with a 
sheep-walk, having much gorse and fern ; the lower 
grounds are more favourable to agriculture. A few pits 
on the hill yield an inferior coal, much of which is used 
in lirne-works ; formerly there were several iron forges 
in the neighbourhood. The living is a discharged rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 3. 6. 8. ; patron, 
Hon. S. Herbert; net income, 147, arising from tithes 
and a small estate, with 49 acres of glebe, of which 22 
are in the parish of Stoke St. Milborough. The church 
is a rude structure, with walls of great thickness, and 
much of it appears to have been rebuilt about 150 or 200 
years ago ; in the chancel is a window in the decorated 
style. Abdon Burf, on the summit of Brown Glee hill, 
is a remarkable oval inclosure of basalt stones, evidently 
British; the area measures from north to south 1317 
feet, and at its widest point from east to west it is 
660 feet ; and huge blocks of stone are scattered within 
it, of which several are arranged in circles. 

ABERFORD (ST. RICHARD), a parish (formerly a 
market-town), in the Lower division of the wapentake 
of SKYRACK, W. riding of YORK, 7 miles (S. by E.) from 

B2 



ABER 



A B E R 



Wetherby, and 186f (N. N. W.) from London, on the 
road to Carlisle ; comprising the townships of Aberford, 
Parlington, and Sturton-Grange, and containing 1071 
inhabitants, of whom 782 are in the townships of Aber- 
ford. The town, which is situated in the parishes of 
Aberford and Sherburn, is built on the gentle acclivity 
of a rock of limestone, near the small river Cock, a 
stream abounding with trout and eels, over which is 
an excellent stone bridge. It consists principally of one 
long street : the houses are in general of stone, and 
many of them are handsome ; the air is pure and salu- 
brious, and the environs are thickly studded with ele- 
gant villas. The parish comprises 3S20 acres of fertile 
land ; there are extensive strata of limestone, and a 
productive coal-mine, from which a railway has been 
laid down to a depAt in the town, and an extensive trade 
is carried on in that article. The Leeds and Selby rail- 
way passes within three miles. The market, which was 
on Wednesday, has been discontinued ; but a customary 
market is held on Friday, and fairs take place on the 
last Monday in April and May, the first Monday in 
October, the first Monday after the 18th of that month, 
and the first Monday after the 2nd of November. The 
magistrates hold a petty-session for the division every 
Thursday, and a court of requests for the recovery of 
small debts was established by act of parliament iri 
1839 ; the town has also lately been made a polling- 
place for the West Riding. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 6. 1. 8., and in 
the patronage of Oriel College, Oxford, to which esta- 
blishment, and the Misses Gascoigne, the impropriation 
belongs ; net income, 305. The church is an ancient 
structure, in the early, decorated, and later styles of 
English architecture. There is a place of worship for 
Wesleyans ; and a national school has been built on the 
site of one formerly endowed, by Lady Elizabeth Hast- 
ings, with 10 per annum. At the distance of a mile 
north of Aberford are vestiges of Castle-Cary, an ancient 
Norman fortification. The battle of Towton, which de- 
cided the long continued war between the Houses of 
York and Lancaster, took place within two miles of 
the town. The Roman road is the parish boundary 
south of the bridge, and cuts off a small district on the 
north, called Greystone Field. The Rev. Mr. Waters, 
a former incumbent, .died at the advanced age of 114 
years. 

ABERGAVENNY <Sr. MARY), a market-town and 
parish, and the head of a union, in the division and 
hundred of ABERGAVENNY, county of MONMOUTH, 16 
miles (W. by N.) from Monmouth, and 145 (W. by N.) 
from London, on the road to Brecon ; comprising the 
hamlets of Hardwick and Llwyndu, and containing 
4953 inhabitants, of whom 2720 are in the town. This 
was the Gobannium of Antoninus, a Roman station so 
called from the river Gobannivs, now Gavenny, from 
which the present name of the town is formed, by pre- 
fixing the Welsh word Aber, denoting its situation near 
the mouth of that river. Soon after the Conquest, a 
castle was erected here, on an eminence overlooking 
the Usk, by Hameline de Balun, or Baladun, one of 
William's followers, which was besieged and taken in 
1215, by Llewelyn, Prince of Wales : the only remains 
are the exterior walls, which appear to have been 
erected in the time of Henry II., and within which 
a neat modern house has been built. De Balun also 
4 



founded a priory for Benedictine monks, in honour of 
the Blessed Virgin, the revenue of which, at the dissolu- 
tion, was 59. 4. : it stood in Monk-street, and the site 
is now occupied by a modern dwelling, called the Priory 
House. The TOWN, which is lighted with gas and well 
supplied with water, is beautifully situated at the extre- 
mity of a pass, where the mountains abruptly termi- 
nate, and is watered by the rivers Usk, Gavenny, and 
Kibby, over the first of which is an ancient bridge of 
fifteen arches, including several dry arches on each side. 
The streets are narrow, and the houses irregularly 
built ; but considerable improvements have been made 
by the enlargement of the market-place, and the removal 
of numerous projections in front of the buildings ; and 
the salubrity of the air, and the picturesque beauty 
of the surrounding scenery, attract numerous visiters 
during the summer months. Assemblies are occasion- 
ally held. The trade is principally in wool, a conside- 
rable quantity of which is sold on the market-days during 
the months of June and July : the mountains in the 
neighbourhood abound with coal and iron-stone, and in 
the surrounding districts numerous iron-works have 
been established. The Monmouthshire and Brecon 
canal, which passes within a mile of the town, affords 
great facility in distributing to every part of the king- 
dom the produce of the mines ; and there is also a tram- 
road to Hereford. The market-days are Tuesday and 
Saturday, the former chiefly for corn : the fairs are 
held on the third Tuesday in March, May 14th (which 
is the principal), June 24th, the Tuesday before July 
20th (at which two last a great quantity of wool is 
sold), Sept. 25th, and Nov. 19th. The charter of in- 
corporation, by which the government of the town was 
vested in a bailiff, recorder, and twenty-seven burgesses, 
was forfeited in the reign of William III., and the 
town is now within the jurisdiction of the county magi- 
strates, who hold a petty- session every Wednesday. 

The LIVING is a discharged vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 10. 0. 7^- ; net income, 451 ; patron, 
C. Bailey, Esq. ; impropriator, Mrs. Bagot. The church 
is a spacious structure, the body and side-aisles of 
which were taken down in 1828, and rebuilt, and gal- 
leries erected j there are several very ancient monu- 
ments, principally of the Herberts, some of whom were 
killed at the battle of Agincourt. A neat pile of build- 
ing in the Tudor style, consisting of an oblong square, 
with a handsome church dedicated to the Holy Trinity 
in the centre, was erected in 1840, at the sole expense of 
Miss Rachel Herbert, of The Hill, near the town : the 
south side of the square consists of a residence for the 
minister, and four cottages, the north side having the 
same number of cottages, and a schoolroom for fifty 
girls, with apartments for the mistress ; Miss Herbert, 
who has endowed the cottages, which are for aged 
women, is patroness for life, and the bishop of the 
diocese will afterwards appoint to the living, which Miss 
Herbert has endowed with 3000. There are two places 
of worship for Baptists, and one each for Independents, 
English and Welsh Wesleyans, and Roman Catholics. 
The free grammar school, founded by Henry VIII. in 
1 543, and formerly under the management of the cor- 
poration, was, on the forfeiture of their charter, placed 
under the control of the Master and Fellows of Jesus' 
College, Oxford, who appoint the master, with preference 
to a fellow of that college ; a writing-master also is ap- 



AB I N 



A BI N 



pointed. The school-house was formerly the parochial 
church of St. John, which was converted to this purpose 
at the dissolution : about the middle of the last century 
it was rebuilt ; but still, from its embattled tower, pre- 
sents the appearance of an ecclesiastical structure. 
William Prichard, in 1623. founded a scholarship in 
Jesus' College, to which boys educated at this school 
are eligible. A national school is supported partly by 
voluntary contributions, and partly from the grammar 
school fund ; and another school, for 50 girls, is main- 
tained wholly by subscription. The poor law union of 
Abergavenny comprises 26 parishes or places in the 
county of Monmouth, and 2 in the county of Hereford, 
and contains a population of 50,834. A variety of Ro- 
man coins, among which were a gold Otho, some bricks 
inscribed " Leg. II. Aug.," and a sudatory, have been 
discovered in the town ; and within half a mile of it are 
the remains of a Roman camp, near which was a chapel 
of ease, now converted into a farm-house. Abergavenny 
confers the title of Earl on the family of Neville j the 
earldom, like those of Arundel and Berkeley, is a local 
dignity, attached to the possession of the castle, and 
the only one now subsisting of those baronies with which 
the Norman warriors, who assisted in the subjugation 
of Wales, were rewarded. 

ABERYSTWITH (S T . PETER), a parish, in the 
union, division, and hundred, of ABERGAVENNY, county 
of MONMOUTH, 9 miles (S. W. by W.) from Aberga- 
venny ; containing 11,272 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is sometimes called " Blaenau," comprises about 
11,000 acres by computation, and abounds with valuable 
mines of iron, which are worked on a very extensive 
scale : it is intersected by numerous tram-roads, com- 
municating with the Brecon and Monmouth canals, 
leading to Newport, where the produce of the various 
works is shipped. A quarry of stone used for roofing 
and paving, is also partially worked. There are villages 
in the parish, connected with the iron-works of Ebbw- 
vale, Nanty-Glo, Coalbrook-vale, Blaina, and Cwmelyn. 
The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with nearly 
the whole of the rectorial tithes, and in the gift of the 
Earl of Abergavenny : the impropriate tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 5. 10., and those of 
the incumbent for 300. The church is a plain struc- 
ture, erected in 1827. There are places of worship for 
Baptists, Wesleyans, Calvinists, and Ranters ; and a 
national schoolroom, which is licensed as a chapel. 

ABINGDON, a borough 
and market-town, having 
exclusive jurisdiction, and 
the head of a union, locally 
in the hundred of HORMER, 
county of BERKS, of which 
it is the county town, 6 miles 
(S.) from Oxford, 26 (N. W. 
by N.) from Reading, and 
56 (W.N. W.) from London ; 
containing, exclusively of 
that part of the parish of 
St. Helen which is in the 




Arms. 



hundred of Hormer, 5585 inhabitants ; of which num- 
ber 4947 are in the parish of St. Helen, and 638 in 
that of St. Nicholas. This place, according to a manu- 
script in the Cottonian library, quoted by Dugdale, 
was, in the time of the Britons, a city of consider- 
5 



able importance, and distinguished as a royal resi- 
dence, to which the people resorted to assist at the great 
councils of the nation. By the Saxons it was called 
Scovechesham, or Sewsharn, but acquired the name of 
Abbendon, " the town of the abbey," on the removal 
hither, in 680, of a monastic institution previously 
founded at Bagley Wood, now an extra-parochial liberty 
in the vicinity, by Cissa, viceroy of Centwine, ninth king 
of Wessex, on which Ceadwalla, his son and successor, 
bestowed the town and its appendages. After the esta- 
blishment of the monastery, Oifa, King of Mercia, on a 
visit to Abingdon, was so much pleased with the situa- 
tion, that he erected a palace here, in which he and his 
immediate successors, Egferth and Cenwulf, occasionally 
resided. The monastery continued to flourish till 871, 
when it was destroyed by the Danes ; in consequence 
of which, Edred, grandson of Alfred, in 955, laid the 
first stone of a new monastery, which was completed 
after his death by the abbot Ethelwold, and his succes- 
sor Ordgar, and which, from the extent of its endow- 
ments and privileges, subsequently augmented by Edgar 
and Canute the Great, was raised to the dignity of a 
mitred abbey. William the Conqueror celebrated the 
festival of Easter at Abingdon, in 1084, where he was 
sumptuously entertained by Robert D'Oilly, one of the 
most powerful barons of the time, under whose care he 
left his son Henry to be educated in this convent, where 
the prince imbibed those acquirements which afterwards 
procured for him the surname of Beauclerc. At the disso- 
lution, the revenue of the abbey was 1876. 10. 9. A 
nunnery was also founded here by Cilia, niece of Cissa, 
over which she presided till her death, when it was 
removed to Witham : its site was afterwards given, by 
Edward VI., to Christ's hospital in this town. The 
Guild of the Holy Cross was instituted in St. Helen's 
church prior to the reign of Richard II., and appears to 
have been refounded in that of Henry V., when the 
brethren erected bridges at Burford and Culhamford, 
where the ferry across the river was so dangerous that 
passengers and cattle were frequently lost : it was dis- 
solved in 1547, at which period its revenue amounted to 
85. 15. 6., and, in 1553, was appropriated to the en- 
dowment of Christ's hospital. In the early part of the 
civil war of the seventeenth century, Charles I. garri- 
soned Abingdon, where he established the head- quarters 
of his cavalry ; but on the retreat of the royal forces to 
Oxford, in 1644, the Earl of Essex took possession of 
it, and garrisoned it for the parliament ; and, a few days 
afterwards, Waller's army, which had been stationed 
near Wantage, entered this town, and among other 
excesses destroyed the cross in the market-place, at 
which, in 1641, the accommodation with the Scots was 
celebrated by 2000 choristers : this cross is particularly 
noticed by Camden for its beauty, and was the model 
of one afterwards erected at Coventry. Sir Stephen 
Hawkins, in 1645, and Prince Rupert, in the following 
year, attacked the garrison unsuccessfully : on these oc- 
casions the defenders put every Irish prisoner to death, 
without trial, whence the expression " Abingdon law." 

The TOWI?, which is pleasantly situated at the influx 
of the small river Ock into the Thames, is handsomely 
built, and consists of several spacious streets diverging 
from the market place ; it is also well paved and lighted, 
under a local act of the 6th of George IV., and is amply 
supplied with water. The several bridges near the town 



A BI N 



have been widened and improved by voluntary contri- 
butions, and the causeway connected with Culham 
bridge forms a pleasant promenade. An act for in- 
closing lands was passed in 1841. Races take place 
here in September, at which time assemblies are held in 
the council-chamber. The manufacture of woollen goods 
was formerly carried on to a great extent, but has quite 
declined ; and during the late war it had a good trade 
in sail-cloth, sacking, and coarse manufactures of a 
similar description ; but, owing to the competition of 
the establishments in the north of England and in 
Scotland, this source of employment has also declined. 
The trade now consists in corn and in malt, and is car- 
ried on to a considerable extent. Several wharfs and 
warehouses have been constructed, where the Wilts and 
Berks canal joins the Thames, near its confluence with 
the Ock. The market-days are Monday, chiefly for 
corn (of which a large quantity is sold), and Friday, 
for provision only : fairs for horses and horned cattle 
are held on the first Monday in Lent, May 6th, June 
20th, Aug. 5th, Sept. IQth, the Monday before Old 
Michaelmas day (a statute fair), Monday after Oct. 12th 
(a great market), and Dec. llthj and there is also a 
fair for wool. 

The BOROUGH was incorporated by Philip and Mary 
in 1555-6, and subsequent charters were granted by 
Elizabeth, James 1., and George III., chiefly confirma- 
tory of the original, by which the corporation was styled 
the " Mayor, Bailiffs, and Burgesses of the borough of 
Abingdon 3" but the corporation is now, under the 
Municipal Act of 1836, styled the " Mayor, Aldermen, 
and Burgesses," which has been adopted as the motto 
of their new seal ; and consists of a mayor, 4 aldermen, 
and 12 councillors : the burgesses are about 300 in 
number, and the mayor, late mayor, and recorder, with 
four others, are justices for the borough, of which the 
municipal and parliamentary boundaries are the same. 
A court of sessions is held quarterly, with jurisdiction 
over felonies and misdemeanors ; a court of record for 
the recovery of debts not exceeding 10 takes place every 
Tuesday, on which day the magistrates hold also a 
petty-session ; and courts leet and view of frankpledge 
are held by the mayor within a month after Easter and 
Michaelmas. The old borough gaol has been converted 
into a police station-house and other uses, and the 
borough justices have the privilege of committing pri- 
soners to the county bridewell ; the prisoners, however, 
being supported out of the borough rate. The town 
returns a member to parliament -. the elective franchise 
is vested in the inhabitants paying scot and lot and 
not receiving alms ; and the mayor is the returning 
officer. The members for the county are elected at 
Abingdon ; and the county magistrates hold a petty- 
session on alternate Mondays for the Abingdon division. 
The market-house is a spacious and elegant building 
of freestone, erected by the corporation in 1678, having 
a commodious hall in which the county court and the 
Nisi Prius court at the assizes are held, and public 
business connected with the borough or county is 
transacted. The county bridewell, a handsome stone 
edifice, erected in 1811, at an expense of 26,000, com- 
prises a neat court-house, in which the -crown court at 
the summer assizes and the July county sessions are 
held j the October sessions take place here and at Read- 
ing alternately. 
6 



Abingdon comprises the parishes of ST. HELEN and 
ST. NICHOLAS ; the former including, in the out-parish, 
part of the townships of Shippon and Northcourt and 
the whole of Sandford, Barton, and Pumney j and the 
latter, the remainder of Shippon and Northcourt, also 
some lands in Sunningwell and Bayworth, which are all 
without the limits of the borough. The living of St. 
Helen's is a vicarage, with that of St. Nicholas and the 
chapelry of Drayton annexed, valued in the king's 
books at 29. 11. 3., and having a net income of 225 ; 
it is in the patronage of the Crown, and the impro- 
priation belongs to the Crown and others. The church 
is a handsome structure, in the early English style, with 
a square embattled tower, surmounted by a lofty spire. 
In addition to the annexed vicarage, there is also a dis- 
charged sinecure rectory belonging to the parish of St. 
Nicholas, and in the patronage of the Crown ; net in- 
come 30. The church of St. Nicholas, built about the 
close of the thirteenth, or commencement of the four- 
teenth, century, has some remains of Norman archi- 
tecture. Mr. Wrigglesworth left lands and tenements, 
in Abingdon, for the support of a lecture in St. Helen's 
church, to be delivered every Saturday evening from 
Michaelmas to Lady-day, and at the church at Marcham 
(a village two miles and a half distant) on every Sun- 
day morning from Lady-day till Michaelmas. There 
are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of 
Friends, Independents, and Wesleyans. The Free Gram- 
mar school, for the education of " Threescore and thir- 
teen" boys was founded in 1563, by John Royse, and 
endowed with two messuages in Birchin-lane, London, 
now occupied by part of the premises belonging to 
the London Assurance Company. In 1608, William 
Bennett, of " Marlborowe," left lands in " Brodebluns- 
don" for the maintenance of six poor scholars in Royse's 
school, who are elected by the master and governors of 
Christ's hospital in this town, and, from the increase 
of the funds, are clothed, and instructed also in writing 
and arithmetic j and in 1609, Thomas Tesdale gave cer- 
tain lands in the county of Warwick, to maintain an 
usher, whose salary is 120. 6. per annum. The school 
is entitled to six scholarships at Pembroke College, 
Oxford, established by Thomas Tesdale, two to be filled 
by the founder's kin, and the others from Abingdon 
school ; and to four more scholarships at the same 
college, instituted by Richard Wightwick, two for the 
founder's kin. Preference is given to boys on Bennett's 
foundation, and the master's private pupils are eligible. 
Several bequests have also been left for the education of 
poor boys and girls in other schools ; and a national 
and a British school are carried on. 

Christ's Hospital, on the west side of St. Helen's 
church, erected in 1446, originally belonged to the fra- 
ternity of the Holy Cross, on the dissolution of which 
establishment, in 1547, the inhabitants applied, through 
Sir John Mason, to King Edward VI., for the restora- 
tion of their lost estates, and the foundation of an 
hospital for the relief of the poor of the town j in com- 
pliance with which application that monarch, by letters 
patent in 1553, founded the hospital under its present 
name, and incorporated twelve persons for its govern- 
ment, by the name of " The Master and Governors of 
the Hospital of Christ." It consists of almshouses for 
six poor men and six women and a nurse, with cloisters, 
and a handsome hall, where prayers are read morn- 



A BI N 



AI3KE 



ing and evening to the inmates. An almshouse was 
built in 1718, for eighteen men or women ; and there 
is another, near the river Isis, for six men or women, 
to which Mr. Beasley, in 1826, bequeathed 600 stock, 
the interest to be paid weekly, and the late Thomas 
Knight, Esq., in 1836, left 600 three and a half 
per cents. St. John's hospital, in the Vineyard, was 
endowed before the Reformation, for six poor men, 
and rebuilt by the corporation, in 1801 : B. Bed well, 
Esq., was a liberal contributor to it, and Mr. Beasley 
added 600 stock to the endowment. An almshouse 
near St. Helen's church was erected in 1707, by Charles 
Twitty, for the maintenance of three men and three 
women; bequests of C 200 each, by John Bed well, in 
1799, and Samuel Cripps, in 1819, and of 600 three 
per cent, stock by Mr. Beasley, in 1826, have been 
added to the original endowment. There are also houses 
for four men and four women, endowed in 1733, by 
Benjamin Tornkins ; and various charitable bequests 
have been made to the poor of the town. The union 
of Abingdon comprises 27 parishes or places, in the 
county of Berks, and 11 in that of Oxford, and con- 
tains a population of 18,789- The remains of the abbey 
consist chiefly of the gateway entrance, which, though 
greatly mutilated, displays some beautiful details of the 
later style of English architecture. St. Edmund, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury ; Sir John Mason, British am- 
bassador at the court of France, and chancellor of the 
University of Oxford 5 and the late Lord Colchester, 
were natives of this place ; which confers the title of 
Earl on the family of Bertie. 

ABINGER (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
DORKING, First division of the hundred of WOTTON, 
W. division of SURREY, 4| miles (S. W. by W.) from 
Dorking ; containing 9*20 inhabitants. This parish is 
noticed in the Domesday survey, under the appellation 
of Abinebourne ; it comprises a small hamlet called 
Hammer, from an iron hammer mill formerly erected 
here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 12. 8. l., and in the gift of the Evelyn 
family : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 584, and there are 85 acres of glebe. The 
church, which occupies an elevated site, is an ancient 
edifice, with a low wooden tower and pyramidal spire. 
A school was commenced in 1829, and is supported by 
subscription. Lady Evelyn, in 1817, left 500 to the 
poor of this and the adjoining parish of Wotton ; and 
the parish enjoys benefit from Henry Smith's charity. 
Oakham Grove was the seat of the celebrated Sir John 
Evelyn, and Parkhurst, of Lord Macartney. Sir James 
Scarlett was raised to the peerage by the title of Baron 
Abinger in 1835, having just previously been created 
chief baron of the exchequer. 

ABINGHALL (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union of WESTBURY, hundred of ST. BRIAVELLS, W. 
division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 4 miles (N. by 
W.) from Newnham ; containing 239 inhabitants. This 
place, formerly called Abbenhall, derived its name from 
having been the residence of the abbots of Flaxley. It 
contains 691 acres, of which 306 are arable, 238 pas- 
ture, and 121 woodland; the surface is hilly, and the 
soil in general sandy, but towards the east it is rich and 
fertile, and the scenery rurally picturesque. There are 
mines of coal and iron ore, and stone is quarried ; and 
facilities of conveyance are afforded by tram-roads and 
7 



the Severn. The manufacture of paper is carried on to 
a considerable extent at Gun's mills, formerly an iron 
furnace ; the machinery is worked by a stream issuing 
from St. Anthony's well, the water of which is reputed 
to be efficacious in cutaneous diseases. The living is a 
discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at. 6. 6. 8., 
and in the gift of the Dean of Llandaff : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 136. 17., and 
there are 26 acres of glebe. The church is an old edifice, 
in the early English style. 

ABINGTON (Sr. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a parish, 
in the hundred of SPELHOE, union, and S. division 
of the county, of NORTHAMPTON, l mile (E. N. E.) from 
Northampton ; containing 143 inhabitants. This was 
the residence and burial-place of Elizabeth Hall, grand- 
daughter of the immortal Shakspeare, and widow of 
Thomas Nash, Esq. : she married Sir John Bernard, 
lord of the manor of Abington, and resided here till her 
death. The parish, which is bounded on the south and 
south-east by the river Nene, comprises 1 140 acres ; 
and the roads to Kettering and Wellingborough pass 
through it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 20 ; net income, 200 ; patron, J. H. Thursby, 
Esq. The church exhibits various styles of English 
architecture. 

ABINGTON, GREAT (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of LINTON, hundred of CHILFORD, county of 
CAMBRIDGE, 2^ miles (N. W.) from Linton ; containing 
358 inhabitants. This place was formerly in the pos- 
session of the Veres, Earls of Oxford, to one of whom a 
market on Friday, to be held here, was granted about 
1256, with a fair on the festival of St. Lawrence, both of 
which have been long discontinued. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
7. 16. 3. ; net income, 62 ; patron and irnpropriator, 
T. Mortlock, Esq. The tithes, with some exceptions, 
were commuted for land under an inclosure act in 1801. 
A school for girls is supported by subscription. 

ABINGTON-IN-THE-CLAY, or ABINGTON-PIGOTS 
(ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union of ROYSTON, 
hundred of ARMINGFORD, county of CAMBRIDGE, 4^ 
miles (W. N. W.) from Royston ; containing 232 in- 
habitants. It had formerly the privilege of holding a 
market on Friday, granted about the year 1335 to the 
Bassingbourns. The parish comprises 1239a. 8p., of 
which 885 acres are arable, 268 meadow, 64 wood, and 
19 occupied by cottages. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 16. 2. 3^., and in the 
gift of M. G. F. Pigott, Esq. : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 354, and there are 28 acres 
of glebe. A school is supported by subscription. 

ABINGTON, LITTLE (S-r. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of LINTON, hundred of CHILFORD, county of 
CAMBRIDGE, 2f miles (N. W. by N.) from Linton; con- 
taining 277 inhabitants. This place appears to be of 
some antiquity, its church having been given by Ste- 
phen, Earl of Brittany, to the monastery of St. Mary in 
York, subsequently to which, the prior of Pentney, in 
Norfolk, possessed it. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 7. 6. 5^. ; net in- 
come, 87 ; patron, T. Mortlock, Esq. The tithes were 
commuted for land and a money payment by an in- 
closure act in 1801. 

AB-KETTLEBY (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the 
union of MELTON-MOWBRAY, hundred of FRAMLAND, 



ABT H 



A C C O 



N. division of the county of LEICESTER, 3 miles 
(N. W. by N.) from Melton-Mowbray, on the road to 
Nottingham ; containing, with the hamlet of Holwell, 
380 inhabitants. This parish, situated near the border 
of Nottinghamshire, comprises 2127 acres, of which 660 
are arable, and 1467 pasture. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 15. 10. 5., and in the 
patronage of the Rev. Thomas Bingham : the tithes for 
the waste grounds inclosed in the parish were commu- 
ted for land by an inclosure act in 1761. At Holwell 
is a chapel of ease. There is a school for children of both 
sexes, supported by the incumbent. 

ABLINGTON, a tything, in the parish of BIBURY, 
union of NORTHLEACH, hundred of BRIGHTWELL'S-BAR- 
ROW, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, Similes 
(N. W. by N.) from Fairford ; containing 96 inhabit- 
ants. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 364. 5. 

ABLINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of FIGHEL- 
DEAN, union and hundred of AMESBURY, Everley and 
Pewsey, and S. divisions of WILTS ; containing 137 in- 
habitants. 

ABNEY, a hamlet, in the parish of HOPE, union 
ofBAKEWELL, hundred of HIGH PEAK, N. division of 
the county of DERBY, 4f miles (N. E.) from Tideswell ; 
containing 102 inhabitants. 

ABRAM, a township, in the parish and union of 
WIGAN, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of 
the county of LANCASTER, 4^ miles (N. N. E.) from 
Newton-in-Mackerfield ; containing 901 inhabitants, in- 
cluding 35 in barges. It comprises 1769 acres, of which 
442 are arable, and 1327 pasture. A district church, 
dedicated to St. John, has lately been built, towards de- 
fraying the expense of which the Incorporated Society 
granted 200; and a school-house was erected, in 1824, 
at the cost of Mrs. Bevan, of Lowton house. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 242. 

ABRIDGE, a hamlet, in the parish of LAMBOURN, 
union and hundred of ONGAR, S. division of ESSEX, 6^ 
miles (N. N. W.) from Romford. This place, which is on 
the high road to Chipping-Ongar, and is bounded on the 
north by the river Roding, was formerly called Affe- 
bruge, or Affebridge ; it has within the last few years 
been rapidly increasing, and contains several handsome 
houses. A chapel of ease was erected in 1833; a 
national school has been established ; and there is a 
place of worship for Wesleyans. 

ABSON. See WICK and ABSON. 

ABTHORPE (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in 
the union and hundred of TOWCESTER, S. division of 
the county of NORTHAMPTON, 3 miles (Vf. S. W.) from 
Towcester ; containing, with the hamlets of Char- 
lock and Foscot, 449 inhabitants. This place was for- 
merly a chapelry dependent upon the vicarage of 
Towcester, from which it was separated by act of 
parliament in 1737, and constituted a distinct parish. 
It is situated on the right bank of the river Tow, which 
bounds it on the north-west ; and consists of 1895a. 3r. 
\lp. Limestone is quarried. The living is a vicarage 
not in charge ; net income, 184; patrons, alternately, 
the Bishop of Lichfield, and Samuel Blencowe, Esq., and 
others, to whom the impropriation also belongs. The 
tithes were partially commuted for land under an inclo- 
sure act in 1822 ; and those of the Bishop have been re- 
cently commuted for a reat-charge of 220 ; there are 
8 



about 50 acres of appropriate glebe. Mrs. Jane Leeson, 
by will dated in 1646, bequeathed certain property to 
the poor in this and other villages, and also for the in- 
struction of children in a school-house here, previously 
erected at her expense : the estate at Abthorpe com- 
prises a dwelling-house and about 60 acres of land, 
together with an allotment of nearly 57 acres under the 
act of inclosure. 

ABY (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of LOUTH, 
Marsh division of the hundred of CALCEWORTH, parts 
of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) 
from Alford ; containing, with the hamlet of Greenfield, 
312 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
united, in 1732, to the rectory of Belleau, and valued in 
the king's books at 6. 3. 6. 

ACASTER-MALBIS (HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in 
the union of YORK, partly in the AINSTY wapentake 
and W. riding, but chiefly in the wapentake of OUZE 
and DERWENT, E. riding of YORK, 4 miles (S. by W.) 
from York ; containing 748 inhabitants, of which number 
322 are in the township of Acaster-Malbis. This place 
partly derives its name from the family of Malby, who 
flourished here for some centuries after the Conquest, 
until at length a daughter and heiress was married to 
Fairfax, of Walton, created Viscount Emley. It comprises 
by computation 1839 acres, and is intersected by the 
navigable river Ouse. The living is a perpetual curacy ; 
net income, 56 ; patron and impropriator, Sir F. Law- 
ley, Bart. A school is endowed with land given by John 
Knowles in 1603, which produces 29. 4. 7- per annum, 
and is vested in feoffees, who appoint fourteen poor 
children on the foundation. 

ACASTER-SELBY, a township, in the parish of 
STILLINGFLEET, E. division of AINSTY wapentake, and 
W. riding of YORK, 7-3: miles (S. by W.) from York ; 
containing 188 inhabitants. This place, which anciently 
belonged to the abbot of Selby, is pleasantly situated on 
the banks of the navigable river Ouse. A college for 
a provost and two or three fellows, one of whom was 
to instruct children, was founded here by Robert Stil- 
lington, the revenue of which, at the dissolution, 
was 33. 10. 4. A school is aided by a small endow- 
ment. 

ACCONBURY, * or ACORNBURY (ST. JOHN THE 
BAPTIST), a parish, in the Upper division of the hun- 
dred of WORMELOW, union and county of HEREFORD, 
4 miles (S.) from Hereford ; containing 158 inhabitants. 
This parish comprises 1590 acres by computation, and 
is intersected by the old road from Ross to Hereford, 
and on its western side by that between Hereford and 
Monmouth. A nunnery of the order of St. Augustine 
was founded here, in the reign of John, by Margery, 
wife of Walter de Lacy, to the honour of the Holy 
Cross, the revenue of which, at the dissolution, was 
75. 7. 5. : the remains have been converted into a 
farm-house, and some stone coffins are still preserved. 
The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 53 ; 
patrons, the Governors of Guy's Hospital, London. 
The vaults of the church contain the ashes of many 
illustrious persons, among whom are the first Duke of 
Chandos, and an Earl of Carnarvon. On the summit 
of Acconbury hill, celebrated for its fine plantations and 
drives, and its beautiful views, are traces of a large 
Roman encampment, the rampart of which, on the east 
side, is plainly discernible. 



A C K L 



A C K W 



ACCRINGTON, a post-town, in the parish of WHAL- 
LEY, union of HASLINGDEN, Higher division of the hun- 
dred of BLACKBURN, N. division of LANCASHIRE, 5^ 
miles (E. by S.) from Blackburn ; comprising the cha- 
pelry of Old, and the township of New, Accrington ; 
and containing 8719 inhabitants, of whom 1811 are in 
Old, and 6908 in New, Accrington. Within the last few 
years this place has acquired considerable importance, 
frbm its situation in the calico-printing district ; and 
some large establishments for spinning cotton thread, 
and weaving and printing calico, have been formed. 
An act for lighting the township with gas, and supplying 
the inhabitants with *water, was passed in 1841. Old 
Accrington contains about 739 acres, and New Accring- 
ton, 2450. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 
158; patron, Vicar of Whalley ; appropriator, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. The chapel was taken down and 
rebuilt upon a larger scale, in 1896; and an additional 
church was erected in 1840, in the form of a cross, at 
an expense of above 7000, defrayed by Messrs. Har- 
greaves and Co., and other inhabitants. There are 
places of worship for Baptists, Wesleyans, and Sweden- 
borgians ; also a national school, erected by subscription 
in 1806, and towards the support of which Jonathan 
Peel, Esq., in 1824, gave 1000. 

ACHURCH. See THORPE-ACHURCH. 

ACKLAM (Sr. 'JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in the 
union of MALTON, wapentake of BUCKROSE, E. riding 
of YORK ; containing the townships of Acklam-with- 
Barthorpe and Leavening, and 845 inhabitants, of whom 
411 are in Acklam-with-Barthorpe, 7i miles (S.) from 
New Malton. The parish comprises about 4000 acres ; 
the surface is elevated, including a portion of the wolds, 
from which a most extensive view of the surrounding 
country is obtained ; and the scenery is in many parts 
beautifully romantic. The soil in the valley is a strong 
clay, and in other parts of lighter quality ; and stone of 
a good kind for building is largely quarried. The village 
is situated in a narrow valley, on the west of the wolds. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 5; net income, 108; patron and appro- 
priator, Chancellor of the Cathedral of York. The 
church, rebuilt in 1790, is a neat structure, with a square 
tower, and contains 250 sittings, all of which are free. 
There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists 
and Wesleyans. The parochial school is endowed with 
one acre of land, and is further supported by subscrip- 
tion. 

ACKLAM-iN-CLEVELAND, a parish, in the union of 
STOCKTON-UPON-TEES, W. division of the liberty of 
LANGBAURGH, N. riding of YORK, 3 miles (S. E. by E.) 
from Stockton ; containing 97 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is on the road from Stokesley to Stockton, and 
bounded on the west by the river Tees, includes parts of 
the townships of Linthorpe and Ayresome, and com- 
prises an area of about 1050 acres, chiefly the property 
of Thomas Hustler, Esq., lord of the manor ; the sur- 
face is varied, but generally flat. The soil in the eastern 
portion is clay, and in the western sandy, and the 
scenery of pleasing character ; the lands, which are 
nearly all arable, and in good cultivation, are divided 
into several farms of moderate extent. The Stockton 
and Middlesborough railway passes through the parish. 
Acklam Hall, the seat of Mr. Hustler, has been recently 
re-fronted, and is a spacious and handsome mansion of 
VOL. I. 9 



brick, pleasantly situated in grounds well laid out, and 
ornamented with plantations. The village is on the road 
side. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage 
of the Archbishop of York, the appropriator, and has 
a net income of 44 : the church, which had become 
dilapidated, was rebuilt in 1772, and is a neat structure, 
covered with Westmorland blue slates. At Linthorpe 
is a school endowed with a house and garden and 5 
per annum, bequeathed by Miss Everald Hustler, in 
1770. The parish was formerly noted for a fine breed 
of Durham short-horned cattle. 

ACKLINGTON, a township, in the parish of WARK- 
WORTH, union of ALNWICK, E. division of COQUETDALE 
ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 10^ miles 
(S. S. E.) from ALNWICK ; containing 301 inhabitants. 
The manor formed a part of the barony of Warkworth, 
and at a very early period belonged to the Percys, earls 
of Northumberland, in whose family it still remains. 
The village, which is pretty large, is situated a little to 
the south of the river Coquet, and about midway between 
the sea and the road from Alnwick to Morpeth ; and is 
chiefly inhabited by mechanics and labourers. The 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge amounting 
to 283. 7- 6., of which 232. 18. are payable to the 
Bishop of Carlisle, and 50. 9- 6. to the vicar. Coal is 
obtained in the township. 

ACKLINGTON-PARK, a township, in the parish of 
WARKWORTH, union of ALNWICK, E. division of CO- 
QUETDALE ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 
9 miles (S. S. E.) from Alnwick: containing 133 inha- 
bitants. This place lies on the south side of the river 
Coquet, not very far distant from the North sea, and in 
a fine secluded situation : it belongs to the Duke of 
Northumberland. There is a coarse woollen manufac- 
tory. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 56. 14. 9., of which 55. 11. 6. are payable to the 
Bishop of Carlisle, and 1. 3. 3. to the vicar. 

ACKTON, a township, in the parish of FEATHER- 
STONE, Lower division of the wapentake of AGBRIGG, 
W. riding of YORK, 3^ miles (W.) from Pontefract ; 
containing 76 inhabitants. This place, called also Aikton, 
a probable corruption of Oak Town, from the number of 
oak trees growing in its vicinity, comprises by compu- 
tation 1090 acres of land. Aikton Hall was purchased 
by Langdale Sunderland, Esq., of Halifax, one of the 
worthies who followed the fortunes of Charles L, and 
who raised a troop of horse for his Majesty's service, 
and was at the battle of Marston Moor : Oliver Crom- 
well fined him 878. 

ACKWORTH (ST. CUT u BERT), a parish, in the 
Upper division of the wapentake of OSGOLDCROSS, W. 
riding of YORK, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from Pontefract; 
containing 1828 inhabitants. This parish, which occu- 
pies an elevated situation, comprises 2537. 3r. 27p. of 
profitable land, and 36 acres of roads and waste ; the 
soil is fertile ; the surface is boldly undulated, and the 
surrounding scenery is richly embellished with wood. 
Freestone of excellent quality is abundant, and there are 
some extensive quarries at Moor Top in the parish. 
Ackworth Park is the beautiful seat of John Gully, Esq., 
and Ackworth House, that of Major Goldsworthy. The 
village, which is divided into High and Low Ackworth, 
is situated on rising ground near the source of the river 
Went, and contains numerous neat and well-built houses 
with several pleasant villas in. the immediate neigh- 

C 



A CLE 



A COM 



bourhood. Handloom weaving is carried on to a limited 
extent. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 22. 1. 0|., and in the patronage of the Crown, 
in right of the Duchy of Lancaster ; net income, 403. 
The tithes were commuted for land and a money pay- 
ment, under an act of inclosure, in 1774, and the glebe 
comprises 152 acres. The church, an ancient structure 
situated in Upper Ackworth, has at various times under- 
gone much alteration and repair, and contains 500 
sittings, of which 100 are free. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans. 

The school belonging to the SOCIETY OF FRIENDS 
was originally and for some years an appendage to the 
Foundling Hospital of London, for which purpose it was 
originally built, at an expense of 13,000, defrayed by 
subscription, aided by a grant from parliament : upon 
its separation from that institution, the house, with 84 
acres of land attached to it, was purchased in 1777 by 
Dr. Fothergill and two or three other gentlemen of the 
Society of Friends for 7000, and was afterwards appro- 
priated as a school for the education of the children of 
the less wealthy members of that community. The 
buildings, which are situated between Higher and Lower 
Ackworth, consist of a centre and two wings connected 
by corridors, and comprise arrangements for the recep- 
tion of 180 boys and 120 girls, who are instructed by four 
masters and four mistresses, respectively, in the general 
rudiments of an English education ; and of the boys, 
20 of the more advanced are taught Latin. During the 
intervals of study the boys are frequently employed in 
farming and gardening, and the girls in the various 
domestic duties ; and when of proper age, the former 
are placed out as apprentices to various trades, and the 
latter as servants in respectable families. The school is 
under the superintendence of a committee of 28 friends 
resident in Ackworth and its vicinity, and of a com- 
mittee of 21 resident in London. The buildings, to 
which various additions have been made, together with 
the land, which has been extended to 274 acres, are 
estimated at 30,000 ; and a fund of 500, vested in 
the three per cents, is appropriated to the apprenticing 
of the boys, and to the distribution of premiums to the 
girls, as an encouragement to remain for three years at 
least in one family. A school for girls was established 
in 1833 by Miss Howard, and one for boys in 1840 by 
subscription ; and the hospital and school at High Ack- 
worth were built by Mrs. Mary Lowther, who in 1741 
endowed them with 17 acres of land, now producing 
30 per annum, and with 700 invested at 5 per cent 
interest. From this endowment a schoolmaster receives 
16 per annum for teaching 20 children ; and six alms- 
houses were endowed by Mrs. Mary Lowther, in 1741, 
for six aged women, who have an annuity of 7- 12. 
each. There also several benefactions for distribution 
among the poor of the parish. 

ACLE (ST. EDMUND), a parish, in the union of BLO- 
FIELD, hundred of WALSHAM, E. division of NORFOLK, 
11 miles (E.) from Norwich; containing 864 inhabit- 
ants. This place, at the time of the Norman Conquest, 
became a fief of the crown, and was granted by William 
to Roger Bigod, who obtained for it the privilege of a 
market and a fair ; and in the reign of Richard II. the 
inhabitants were exempted from all tolls and suits of 
shire and hundred, and invested with several valuable 
immunities. The parish comprises 3l64#. 2r. 8p., a 
10 



large portion of which is grazing land reclaimed from 
marshy ground ; the uplands consist of a fine loamy 
soil, and are exceedingly fertile. The village is situated 
on the road from Norwich to Yarmouth, and on a gentle 
eminence rising from the banks of the navigable river 
Bure, over which is a stone bridge of three arches, and 
of great elevation. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 20, and in the gift of Lord Cal- 
thorpe : the tithes have been commuted for 720, and 
there are about twenty acres of glebe, and a good rectory- 
house. The church, which is chiefly in the decorated 
style, consists of a nave and chancel, with a circular 
tower, the upper part of which i9 octagon : the edifice 
was thoroughly repaired and beautified in 1834. A school 
for boys and girls is chiefly supported by Lord Calthorpe, 
and by subscription. At Weybridge a small priory for 
Augustine canons was founded in the reign of Edward 
I., by Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, the revenue of 
which at the dissolution was 7. 13. 4. 

ACOMB (ST. STEPHEN), a parish, in the AINSTY 
wapentake, W. riding of YORK ; containing 880 inha- 
bitants, of whom 774 are in the township of Acomb, 2^ 
miles (W.) from York, on the road to Leeds via We- 
therby. This parish, anciently Ascham, comprises by 
measurement 1920 acres, and is bounded on the north 
by the river Ouse, on which is a small wharf for coal, 
lime, &c. adjacent to the Darlington 'railway : the soil is 
of a sandy and gravelly nature, and the air remarkably 
salubrious ; and several mansions and villas are occu- 
pied by families of the first respectability. Acomb 
House is an establishment for the insane in the higher 
grades of society, conducted by Mr. Hodgson, late sur- 
geon and superintendent to the York Lunatic Asylum, 
and who, on retiring from that institution in 1828, 
received the thanks of a special court of governors, con- 
sisting of 52 members, through the Archbishop of York. 
The village has a neat appearance ; and the York and 
North-Midland railway passes near it at Hob Moor. 
Part of Knapton and also Dringhouses are in the parish, 
and churchwardens are elected for these places along 
with those for Acomb. 

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 3. 9. 2.; net income, 109; patron and 
incumbent, the Rev. Isaac Spencer, M.A., of " The Plan- 
tation," near York. The peculiar of Acomb formerly 
belonged to the Treasurer in the Cathedral of York, but 
was surrendered, with the rectory, to the Crown in 
1547 ; and in 1609 it was granted by James I. to 
Thomas Newark and his heir. The tithes of the town- 
ships of Acomb and Holgate were commuted for land 
and a money payment, by an inclosure act in 1774. 
The church, rebuilt in 1831-2, by subscription, and a 
grant from the Church Building Society, is an elegant 
structure, with a graceful spire, and, standing on the 
highest ground in the vicinity of York, has a very pic- 
turesque appearance : it contains 609 sittings, of which 
212 are free. There are places of worship for Wesleyans 
and Primitive Methodists ; and a national school is 
supported by subscription. Four annuities for the poor, 
left by W T illiam Wharton, in 1829, and three other 
donors, produce 16. 17. per annum. Half a mile from 
the village is a hill, supposed to be the tumulus of Sep- 
timius Severus, the Roman emperor, who died at York, 
and which is now called Severus' Hill. See the article 
on DRINGHOUSES. 



A CTO 



A CTO 



ACOMB, EAST, a township, iu the parish of BYWELL- 
ST. PETER, union of HEXHAM, E. division of TINDALE 
ward, S. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 8 miles (E.) 
from Hexham ; containing 37 inhabitants. It is situated 
about a mile north from Byvvell, and consists of two 
farms ; and Peepee, a pleasant hamlet, lies at a little 
distance to the westward. This, and many other parts 
of the Bywell estate, are covered with trees of a remark- 
ably fine growth, which impart to the landscape a rich 
and luxuriant aspect. The township is the property of 
T. W. Beaumont, Esq. 

ACOMB, WEST, a township, in the parish of ST. 
JOHN-LEE, union of HEXHAM, S. division of TINDALE 
ward and of NORTHUMBERLAND, if mile (N.) from 
Hexham ; containing 571 inhabitants. This place, an- 
ciently Hameshaly, belonged to the prior of Hexham, 
and is supposed to have been the favourite retreat of St. 
John of Beverley : on the dissolution of the priory it 
came to the crown, and in 1724 was the property of the 
Coatsworth family, and subsequently of the Jurins and 
Hunters. The township is bounded on the south by 
the river Tyne : coal is obtained within its limits ; and 
the Newcastle and Carlisle railway passes through it. 
The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 65. 

ACORNBURY. See ACCONBURY. 

ACRISE (Sr. MARTIN), a parish, in the union of 
ELHAM, partly in the hundred of FOLKESTONE, but 
chiefly in that of LONINGBOROUGH, lathe of SHEPWAY, 
E. division of KENT, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Folke- 
stone, near the road to Canterbury ; containing 207 
inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 7, and in the patronage of the Crown : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
217. and there are nearly 44 acres of glebe. 

ACTON, a township, in the parish of WEAVERHAM, 
union of NORTHWICH, Second division of the hundred 
of EDDISBURY, S. division of CHESHIRE, 4^ miles (W. 
N. W.) from Northwich ; containing 382 inhabitants. 
The Grand Junction railway and the Nantwich branch 
of the Chester canal pass through the township ; and 
on the former a station of the second class has been 
formed. A school is chiefly supported by subscription. 

ACTON (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of NANTWICH, S. division of CHESHIRE, com- 
prising the townships of Acton, Aston-juxta-Mondrum, 
Austerson, Baddington, Brindley, Burland, Cholmond- 
stone, Cool-Pilate, Edleston, Faddiley, Henhull, Hurle- 
ston, Newhall, Poole, Stoke, and Worleston ; and con- 
taining 4134 inhabitants, of whom 328 are in the town- 
ship of Acton, 1^ mile (N. W. by W.) from Nantwich. 
This place was the scene of some hostilities during the 
parliamentary war; and in October 1643, the church 
and Dorfbrd Hall were occupied by the royalists, on 
whose retreat both were garrisoned by the parliament. 
They were afterwards captured by the king's troops 
under Lord Byron, but, on the raising of the siege of 
Nantwich, Sir Thomas Fairfax compelled the garrisons 
to surrender, and among the prisoners were sixty officers, 
including Col. Monk, afterwards Duke of Albemarle. 
The Chester and Crewe railway passes close by Acton 
Hall, and crosses the Middlewich and Wardle canal at 
the Cholmondstone lock in this parish. The living is a 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 19. 9. 7- ; net 
income, 324 ; patron and impropriator Admiral Tolle- 
11 



mache. The church exhibits some curiously ornamented 
windows, and the tower is partly in the early style of 
English architecture. There is an endowed school ; and 
a school in connexion with the National Society has 
also been established. Sir Roger Wilbraham founded 
and endowed two almshouses here in 1613. 

ACTON (Sr. MARY}, a parish, in the union of BRENT- 
FORD, Kensington division of the hundred of OSSULSTONE, 
county of MIDDLESEX, 5 miles (W.) from London ; 
containing, with the hamlets of East Acton and Steyne, 
2665 inhabitants. The name is supposed to be derived 
from the Saxon word Ac, signifying oak, and tun, a 
town ; the neighbourhood having, in former times, 
abounded with timber of that description, and some 
land in the parish, from time immemorial, having been 
called Old Oak common. Previously to the battle of 
Brentford, in 1642, the Earls of Essex and Warwick 
had their head-quarters here ; and, on Cromwell's re- 
turn to London, after the battle of Worcester, the lord 
president and council of state, the members of the 
house of commons, and the lord mayor, aldermen, and 
citizens of London, met him at this place, when the 
recorder of London delivered a congratulatory address, 
after which they attended him to the metropolis, form- 
ing altogether a train of more than three hundred car- 
riages. The village consists chiefly of one long street, 
and is plentifully supplied with water ; and the Pad- 
dington canal and the Great Western railway run 
through the parish. A pleasure fair is held on Holy 
Thursday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 14; net income, 968 ; patron, Bishop of 
London. The church, which exhibits portions in the 
later style of English architecture, with modern inser- 
tions, was enlarged and repaired, at the expense of the 
inhabitants, in 1825. There is a place of worship for 
Independents, and the detached buildings of a private 
mansion have been fitted up as a Roman Catholic 
chapel. A Lancasterian school has been erected near 
the church ; and there is also a school in union with 
the National Society. At East Acton are handsome 
almshouses, built and endowed by the Goldsmiths' 
Company, for twelve men and twelve women. In a 
garden, on Old Oak common, is a mineral spring, for- 
merly held in general repute, but now disused. 

ACTON, with OLD FELTON, a township, in the 
parish of FELTON, union of ALNWICK, E. division of 
COQUETDALE ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 
1\ miles (S.) fromAlnwick; containing 111 inhabit- 
ants. This place extends between one and two miles 
north of the village of Felton. Acton House, the seat 
of J. H. Hinde, Esq., M.P., is a handsome mansion ; and 
North Acton Hall is also a fine structure, beautifully 
situated : the adjoining lands are fertile and picturesque. 
The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 40. 6. 

ACTON {ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
SUDBURY, hundred of BABERGH, W. division of SUF- 
FOLK, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from Sudbury ; comprising 
281 la. 21/>. ; and containing 555 inhabitants. There 
are several small hamlets in the parish, that which is 
called " the village " being the principal. The living 
is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 9. 6. 8. ; 
patron and impropriator, Earl Howe. The great tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 375, and 
the vicarial for the same amount. The church is very 



A C T O 



ADD E 



neat, and contains some ancient and very handsome 
brasses. 

ACTON, ANGAR, a tything, in the parish of IRON- 
ACTON, Lower division of the hundred of GRUMBALD'S- 
ASH, W. division of the county of GLOUCESTER. 

ACTON-BEAUCHAMP (ST. GILES), a parish, in 
the union of BROMYARD, Upper division of the hun- 
dred of DODDINGTKEE, Worcester and W. divisions of 
the county of WORCESTER, 4 miles (S. E.) from Brom- 
yard ; containing 217 inhabitants. There are by mea- 
surement 1524 acres, of which 717 are arable, 570 
pasture, 150 woodland, and 82 hop ground, &c. ; the 
surface is very hilly, and the soil strong clay, occa- 
sionally degenerating into sterile sand. The parish is 
surrounded on all sides except the east by the county of 
Hereford. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 4, and in the patronage of Mrs. 
Cowpland : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 270, and the glebe consists of 42 acres. 
There are some mineral springs in the parish. 

ACTON-BURNELL (ST. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of ATCHAM, hundred of CONDOVER, S. division of 
SALOP, 7 miles (S.) from Shrewsbury ; containing, with 
Ruckley and Langley, 394 inhabitants. This place, 
which is of considerable antiquity, is on a branch of 
the Roman Watling-street, which passes through it ; 
it takes the adjunct to its name from the family of 
Burnell, of whom Robert, Bishop of Bath and Wells, 
and Lord High Chancellor in the reign of Edward I., had 
a castle here, of which there are still some remains. In 
1283, a great council or parliament was held here, at 
which was enacted the law of " statute merchant :" the 
king and his court were accommodated in the castle, 
the lords assembled in a great hall erected for them in 
the park, and the commons met in a very large barn 
belonging to Shrewsbury Abbey, of which the gable ends 
have been preserved to the present time. Besides the 
Watling-street, a causeway passes through the parish ; 
and there is a Roman bridge, and an early specimen of 
Saxon antiquity called the Moat. The parish com- 
prises by computation 2400 acres. The living is a 
rectory, with the chapelry of Langley, valued in the 
king's books at 6. 10., and in the gift of Sir E. J. 
Smythe, Bart., with a net income of 350 ; the glebe 
consists of about 70 acres, with a good house. The 
church, which is cruciform, was built in 1264, and is a 
splendid specimen of ecclesiastical architecture ; its in- 
ternal decorations are of a highly ornamental character. 
There are a Roman Catholic chapel, a national school, 
and a school for the children of Roman Catholics. 
Nicholas Burnell, a distinguished warrior in the reign 
of Edward III., was born and buried here ; and Langley 
Hall was the birth-place of Sir Humphrey Lee, the first 
baronet created in the county, in 1629. 

ACTON-GRANGE, a township, in the parish and 
union of RUNCORN, hundred of BUCKLOW, N. division 
of the county of CHESTER, 2f miles (S. W. by S.) from 
Warrington; containing 175 inhabitants. The Grand 
Junction railway crosses the township, which is on the 
borders of Lancashire. 

ACTON, IRON. See IRON-ACTON. 

ACTON-PIGOT, a hamlet, in the parish of ACTON- 
BURNELL, union of CHURCH-STRETTON, hundred of 
CONDOVER, S. division of SALOP, 6f miles (W. N. W.) 
from Much-Wenlock; comprising 391 acres, and con- 
12 



taining 40 persons. There was formerly a chapel, the 
remains of which still exist. 

ACTON- REYNALD, a township, in the parish of 
SHAWBURY, union of WEM, liberty of the borough of 
SHREWSBURY, N. division of SALOP, 7^ miles (N. N. E.) 
from Shrewsbury ; containing 159 inhabitants. 

ACTON-ROUND, a parish, in the union of BRIDGE- 
NORTH, hundred of STOTTESDEN, S. division of SALOP, 
3| miles (S. S. E.) from Much-Wenlock, 6 miles 
(W. N. W.) from Bridgenorth ; containing 180 inhabit- 
ants. This parish, which is intersected by the road 
from Much-Wenlock to Bridgenorth, comprises by com- 
putation 2126a. 2r. 26j. The living is a perpetual 
curacy j net income, 74; patron and impropriator, 
Sir John Acton, Bart. Certain tithes were commuted 
for land under an inclosure act in 1773 : there are 
about 25 acres of glebe, of which 14 are near Broms- 
grove in Worcestershire, and 11 in the parish of Stot- 
tesden. The church is a neat edifice, of which the walls 
are ornamented with monuments to the memory of the 
Actons, by one of whom, Sir Richard, the chancel was 
built in 1761. 

ACTON-SCOTT (Sr. MARGARET), a parish, in the 
union of CHURCH-STRETTON, hundred of MUNSLOW, 
S. division of SALOP, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Church- 
Stretton ; containing 204 inhabitants. This parish, 
situated on the new road from Wenlock to Bishop's 
Castle, abounds with bold, and, in some parts, romantic 
scenery, and contains by measurement 1600 acres, all 
cultivated, excepting about 200 under plantation and 
coppice : the surface is hilly ; the soil comprises several 
varieties, and stone is quarried for building and the 
repair of roads. The living is a discharged rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 5. 10., and in the gift of 
E. W. W. Pendarves, Esq. : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 230, and there are 61 acres 
of glebe. A school is supported. 

ACTON-TRUSSELL (ST. JAMES), a parochial cha- 
pelry, in the union of PENKRIDGE, E. division of the 
hundred of CUTTLESTONE, S. division of the county of 
STAFFORD, 3^ miles (N. N. E.) from Penkridge ; con- 
taining, with Bednall, 574 inhabitants. The Stafford- 
shire and Worcestershire canal passes through the 
chapelry, which comprises 2551 acres. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, with that of Bednall united ; net in- 
come, 234 ; patron and incumbent, Rev. G. F. Moli- 
neaux ; appropriator, Prebendary of Whittington and 
Baswick in the Cathedral of Lichfield. There are 
churches at Acton and Bednall, both ancient edifices, 
the former in the early English style, and the latter of 
varied architecture. 

ACTON-TURVILLE (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of CHIPPING-SODBURY, Lower division of the 
hundred of GRUMBALD'S-ASH, W. division of the county 
of GLOUCESTER, 5f- miles (E.) from Chipping- Sodbury 3 
containing 3 1 1 inhabitants. This place, which lies on 
the border of Wiltshire, is exceedingly well situated 
with respect to means of communication, roads branch- 
ing off from the village to the towns of Malmsbury, 
Chippenham, Bath, and Chipping-Sodbury, respec- 
tively. The living is a vicarage not in charge, united to 
the rectory of Tormarton in 1344. 

ADBASTON. See ABDASTON. 

ADBEER, a hamlet, in the parish of TRENT, union 
of SHERBORNE, hundred of HORETHORNE, E. division 



A D D E 



AD D I 



of. SOMERSET, 4f- miles (N. E. by N.) from Yeovil. A 
chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary was demolished 
during the civil war. 

ADBOLTON, formerly a parish, now a hamlet in 
the parish of HOLME-PIERREPOINT, union of BING- 
HAM, S. division of the wapentake of BINGHAM and of 
the county of NOTTINGHAM, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from 
Nottingham ; containing 25 inhabitants. The living, a 
discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at 
2. 13. 9., was, in 1/07, consolidated with the rectory 
of Holme-Pierrepoint : the church is in ruins. 

ADDERBURY, EAST (S T . MARY), a parish, in the 
union of BANBURY, hundred of BLOXHAM, county of 
OXFORD, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Deddington ; con- 
taining, with the township of West Adderbury, and the 
hamlets of Barford St. John, Bodicott, and Milton, 
2525 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book called 
Edburgberic, probably derived that name from St. 
Edburgh, to whom many religious establishments in 
this part of the country were dedicated : in the court 
rolls of New College, to which the lordship belongs, it 
is written " Ebberbury ; " and Henry de Knyghton 
relates that, by a council of bishops held at Oxford, a 
blasphemous impostor, condemned for assuming the 
name and pretending to the wounds of Christ, was 
crucified at " Abberbury," now Adderbury. The parish 
comprises about 5900 acres, of which 1120 are in West 
Adderbury, 1240 in Bodicott, 800 in Milton, and 700 
in Barford St. John. In the eastern part of the village 
stood a magnificent ancient mansion, belonging to the 
Duke of Argyle, afterwards the residence of the Earl of 
Rochester, and of which the remains are now incor- 
porated with a modern seat. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 21. 4. 9^. ; net income, 
818 ; patrons and appropriators, Warden and Fellows 
of New College, Oxford. The church, situated on ele- 
vated ground, is a handsome cruciform structure, in the 
early and decorated English styles, with a massive square 
tower strengthened by angular buttresses, and crowned 
with a pierced parapet, from within which rises an 
octagonal spire, having at the base four octagonal pyra- 
mids surmounted with vanes : between the north tran- 
sept and the east end of the chancel is an octagonal 
turret, crowned with battlements. The chancel, which 
is of beautiful proportions, and built by William of 
Wykeham, is lighted by windows of elegant design, 
though much defaced by the insertion of mullions : part 
of the ancient rood-loft, of exquisite workmanship, is 
remaining ; also some fine tracery at the east end ; and 
the whole of the interior is replete with rich details, 
interspersed with grotesque ornaments. In each of the 
hamlets of Bodicott and Barford St. John is a church, 
both ancient structures, supposed to have been erected 
in the fourteenth century ; and the old parsonage, now 
a farm-house, retains much of its original character. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans ; and some 
endowments have been left for the instruction of children. 

ADDERBURY, WEST, a township, in the parish 
of EAST ADDERBURY, union of BANBURY, hundred of 
BLOXHAM, county of OXFORD, 2 miles (N.) from Ded- 
dington ; comprising about 1120 acres, and containing 
442 inhabitants. 

ADDERLEY, county of SALOP. See ATHERLEY. 

ADDERSTONE, a township, in the parish of BAM- 
BROUGH, union of BELFORD, N. division of BAMBROUGH 
13 



ward and of NORTHUMBERLAND, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) 
from Belford ; containing 302 inhabitants. The manor 
was possessed by the ancient family of Forster, from 
whom it came, in 1763, to John William Bacon, Esq., 
by whom the present handsome mansion, which stands 
near the site of the old hall, on the west bank of the 
Warn, was erected, and whose successor sold the estate 
to J. Pratt, Esq. Twizell House is also situated in the 
township. 

ADDINGHAM (Sr. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of PENRITH, LEATH ward, E. division of CUMBERLAND, 
l mile (S. E.) from Kirk-Oswald; containing, with 
the townships of Gamblesby, Glassonby, Hunsonby, and 
Winskel, and Little Salkeld, 735 inhabitants. The river 
Eden forms the western boundary of the parish, through 
which the Roman road called Maiden-way may be traced 
in many parts of its course : there are some quarries of 
red freestone. The living is a vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 9. 4. 7. ; net income, 253 ; patrons 
and appropriators, Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The 
church is situated in the township of Glassonby : at 
Gamblesby are places of worship for Independents and 
Wesleyans ; also one for the latter at Hunsonby ; and 
there are well-endowed free schools at Hunsonby and 
Maughamby. At Little Salkeld is a remarkable mo- 
nument, supposed to be Druidical, commonly called 
" Long Meg and her Daughters," consisting of 67 stones, 
varying in shape and height, which form a circle about 
350 feet in diameter ; and in the same township was 
anciently a chapel, the site of which, according to tra- 
dition, was at a village called Addingham, on the eastern 
bank of the Eden, where human bones, crosses, and 
other remains, have been dug up. Dr. Paley, the cele- 
brated theological writer, formerly held the living. 

ADDINGHAM (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union 
of SKIPTON, partly in the E. division of the wapentake 
of STAIN CLIFFE and EWCROSS, and partly in the Upper 
division of the wapentake of CLARO, W. riding of YORK, 
6 miles (E. by S.) from Skipton ; containing 1753 inha- 
bitants, of whom 1527 are in the township of Adding- 
ham. It is situated on the western side of the river 
Wharfe, and within the liberty of Clifford's Fee, and 
comprises about 4000 acres, of which 900 are open 
common : the soil is fertile, and the surface varied and 
pleasing ; and freestone of good quality is abundant, and 
extensively quarried. Farfield Hall, the seat of E. C. 
Lister Kaye, Esq., is a handsome mansion in the 
Italian style, originally built by the Earl of Burlington, 
and is finely situated, commanding beautiful views of the 
river and of the picturesque valley through which it 
flows. High House, the residence of John Ellis, Esq., is 
also in the parish. The village, which consists of irre- 
gularly detached houses, extends for nearly a mile in 
length : a portion of the inhabitants are employed in 
the cotton and worsted mills, and in handloom weaving. 
The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 9. 7. 8^. ; income, about 400, with a glebe- 
house beautifully situated ; patron, Rev. William Thomp- 
son. The church, which was rebuilt in 1757, is a neat 
structure with a square tower, and is seated on an emi- 
nence overlooking the river ; it contains 450 sittings. 
There are places of worship for the Society of Friends, 
Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans. On an eminence 
called Counter Hill, about a mile from the village, are 
the remains of a Roman encampment, and some traces 



ADDI 



AD D L 



of a Roman road. A massive and antique ring of gold 
was found in the churchyard some years since. 

ADDINGTON (ST. MARY], a parish, in the union, 
hundred, and county of BUCKINGHAM, if mile (W. N. W.) 
from Winslow; containing 84 inhabitants. It com- 
prises about 1500 acres ; the surface is in general level, 
and the soil good pasture. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 9. 9. 7- i net income, 
200 ; patron, John Poulett, Esq. : the glebe consists 
of 100 acres. On the border of the parish is a place 
called "Gallows Gap," where, in the reign of Edward 
III., a gallows was erected by one of the family of 
Molines, who, as lords of the barony, possessed the 
power of trying and executing capital offenders. 

ADDINGTON (ST. MARGARET), a parish, in the 
union of MALLING, hundred of LARKFIELD, lathe of 
AYLESFORD, W. division of KENT, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) 
from Maidstone ; containing 208 inhabitants. The pa- 
rish comprises about 830 acres, of which 100 are wood- 
land ; and contains one of those land springs very com- 
mon in the eastern part of Kent, called the Ailbourn, 
which breaks out with great impetuosity once in seven 
or eight years, directing its course into a trench dug for 
its reception, till it arrives at the Leybourn rivulet, the 
trout in which, at other times white, it turns to a red 
colour. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 6. 6.8.; net income, 160; patron, Hon. 
J. W. Stratford : the glebe consists of 26 acres. The 
church is pleasantly situated in the midst of foliage on 
rising ground within a valley, near which are remains, 
supposed to be Druidical. 

ADDINGTON (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
CROYDON, First division of the hundred of WALLING- 
TON, E. division of SURREY, 3^ miles (E. S. E.) from 
Croydon ; containing 580 inhabitants. The manor is 
held by the singular tenure of making and presenting to 
the king, at his coronation, a mess of pottage called 
mewpergynon, subject to the performance of which a 
carucate of land here was granted to Tezelin, cook to 
William the Conqueror. The parish comprises by ad- 
measurement 3635 acres, 500 of which are underwood 
or uncultivated. The village is situated at the foot of a 
range of hills to which it gives its name ; and adjacent 
to these hills is Addington Place, which, in 1807, was 
purchased by Dr. Sutton, Archbishop of Canterbury, 
with the funds arising from the sale of the archiepisco- 
pal palace at Croydon. The mansion was originally 
erected by Alderman Trecothick, on the site of an 
ancient edifice said to have been a hunting seat of 
Henry VIII. ; it was improved by Dr. Sutton, and has 
lately been rebuilt with the addition of wings, and the 
grounds much extended by Dr. Howley. The living is 
a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
4. 16. 5. ; patron, Archbishop of Canterbury ; im- 
propriators, the landowners. The great and small 
tithes have been commuted for rent-charges, the former 
for 559. 18. 6., and the latter for 208. 4., and there 
are two acres of glebe. The church, a small structure, 
consisting of a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with a 
low, square, embattled tower, appears to have been 
partly rebuilt in the reign of Edward III. : in the chan- 
cel lie the remains of the late Archbishop Sutton. Near 
the church is an eminence called Castle hill, on which it 
is said that a castle anciently stood ; and on the brow 
of the hill adjoining Addington common, and now in the 
14 



park, are several low tumuli, in which urns have been 
found. 

ADDINGTON, GREAT (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in 
the union of THRAPSTON, hundred of HUXLOE, N. divi- 
sion of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 4^ miles (S. W.) 
from Thrapston ; containing 266 inhabitants. This 
parish, situated on the left bank of the navigable river 
Nene, which bounds it on the east, comprises 1233a. 
3r. 31p. ; the surface is pleasantly diversified with hill 
and dale, and the soil runs through many varieties. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
10. 12. 8^.; net income, 315; patron and incum- 
bent, Rev. James Tyley. The tithes were commuted for 
327 acres of land and a money payment, under an in- 
closure act, in 1803. 

ADDINGTON, LITTLE (ST. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of THRAPSTON, hundred of HUXLOE, N. division 
of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 3^ miles (N.) from 
Higham Ferrers ; containing 299 inhabitants. On the 
east the parish is bounded by the river Nene, and it 
consists of 1104er. 3r. 29p. of a moderately productive 
soil. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with 
the great tithes, and valued in the king's books at 
7. 12.; net income, 245; patron, T. Saunderson, 
Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and a money 
payment, under an inclosure act, in 1830. 

ADDLE, or ADEL, (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, 
in the Upper division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, 
W. riding of YORK ; containing 1121 inhabitants, of 
whom 785 are in the township of Addle-cum-Eccup, 
5| miles (N. N. W.) from Leeds. This place, anciently 
called Adhill, from the Ada of the Saxons, and in some 
documents Adel, was the site of the Roman station Bur- 
godunum, of which some traces, with many inscribed 
stones, fragments of urns, and the remains of an aque- 
duct, were discovered, in 1702, on an adjacent moor, 
near which are vestiges of a camp about 120 yards in 
length and 90 yards in breadth, in which several 
Roman altars, numerous coins, and various other relics, 
have been found. The parish, which is bounded on 
the north by the river Wharfe, comprises by compu- 
tation 8000 acres ; and the surface is varied, and the 
scenery generally of pleasing character. The hamlet of 
Eccup, which is near the site of the Roman camp, 
abounds with springs of excellent water, from which the 
Leeds new water-works are supplied. 

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
1 6. 3. 4. ; net income, 623 ; patron, W. T. Carruthera, 
Esq. : the glebe comprises 1 64 acres, with a good 
house. The church is a handsome and venerable struc- 
ture of Norman design, and one of the most perfect 
specimens of that style in the kingdom; the south door- 
way is highly enriched, and many of its details are of 
great elegance. A school, in which are about 70 chil- 
dren, is partly supported by annual donations from 
Mr. Carruthers, John Wormald, Esq., of Cookridge 
Hall, and the Rev. George Lewthwaite, the rector, 
who also supports a Sunday school. Thos. Kirk, Esq., 
in 1701, bequeathed 800 to the poor, which sum has 
been laid out in the purchase of two houses and 82 acres 
of land, producing an income of 75 per annum, which, 
with a trifling deduction, is distributed in bread every 
Sunday, pursuant to the will of the donor. 

ADDLESTONE, an ecclesiastical district, in the 
parish and union of CHERTSEY, Second division of the 



ABLE 



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hundred of GODLEY, W. division of SURREY ; contain- 
ing about 2000 inhabitants. A church in the early 
English style, affording accommodation for 800 persons, 
has been lately erected, at an expense of about 4000, 
raised by subscription ; it has been endowed with 
2000 by Miss Wightwick, whose family has long re- 
sided in the parish ; and the patronage is vested in the 
Bishop of Winchester. The consecration took place in 
Jan. 1838; and the benefice was augmented in 1841 by 
the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, with 48 per annum. 

ADDLETHORPE (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the 
union of SPILSBY, Marsh division of the wapentake of 
CANDLESHOE, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 
9 miles (E. S. E.) from Alford ; containing 238 inha- 
bitants. It contains about 2000 acres of land, situated 
on the coast, and is subject to encroachments of the 
sea, against which it is necessary to maintain an em- 
bankment at a considerable expense. The living is a 
discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at 
9. 10. 2|. ; net income, 72 ; patron, the Crown : the 
glebe consists of about 7 acres. The church is a fine 
specimen of the perpendicular style, and consists of a 
nave, north and south aisles, and a tower. There is a 
place of worship for Methodists ; and a national school 
has been established. Mr. Mottram in 17 10 bequeathed 
money for two almshouses for widows, with half an 
acre of land to each, and a yearly allowance of coals. 

ADFORTON, with STANWAY, PAYTON, and GRANGE, 
a township, in the parish of LEINTWARDINE, union of 
KNIGHTON, hundred of WIGMORE, county of HERE- 
FORD, 8^ miles (W. S. W.) from Ludlow ; containing 
288 inhabitants, and comprising 1565 acres. The sur- 
face is boldly undulated, and the southern portion well 
wooded. On an eminence at the northern extremity 
are the remains of a Roman encampment called Brandon 
camp ; and the road from Leintwardine to Wigmore 
passes through the village of Adforton. A school is 
endowed with 4 per annum. 

ADGARLEY, a township, in the parish of URSWICK, 
union of ULVERSTONE, hundred of LONSDALE, north of 
the Sands, N. division of the county of LANCASTER, 2 
miles (S. E. by E.) from Dalton ; containing 45 inha- 
bitants. 

ADISHAM (HOLY INNOCENTS), a parish, in the 
union of BRIDGE, hundred of DOWN HAM FORD, lathe of 
ST. AUGUSTINE, E. division of KENT, 2^ miles (S. W. 
by S.) from Wingham ; containing 372 inhabitants. It 
lies a little to the east of the high road from Canterbury 
to Dover. The living is a rectory, with the perpetual 
curacy of Staple annexed, valued in the king's books at 
28. 3. 1|., and in the gift of the Archbishop of Can- 
terbury : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 747, and there are about 13 acres of glebe, 
with a house. The church is a large cruciform edifice, 
with a low tower, in the early style of English architec- 
ture, except the large window of the transept, which is 
in the decorated style : the altar-piece is embellished 
with curious paintings on wood of the Four Evangelists. 
There is a school, partly supported by subscription. 

ADLESTROP (ST. MARY MAGDALENE), a parish, in 
the union of STOW-ON-THE-WOLD, Upper division of 
the hundred of SLAUGHTER, E. division of the county 
of GLOUCESTER, 3f miles (E. by N.) from Stow ; con- 
taining 200 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south- 
east by the road from Stow to Chipping-Norton, and on 
15 



the south-west by the river Evenlode, and is situated 
on the borders of Oxfordshire, not far distant from the 
southern extremity of the county of Warwick. The 
living is a rectory not in charge, annexed to that of 
Broadwell : the tithes were partially commuted for land, 
under an inclosure act, in 1775. The church, with the 
exception of the tower, was rebuilt in 1764. A school 
for boys is supported at the expense of the rector, and 
one for girls has a small endowment. 

ADLINGFLEET (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of GOOLE, Lower division of the wapentake of 
OscoLDCROSS, W. riding of YORK ; comprising the 
townships of Eastoft, Fockerby, and Haldenby ; and 
containing 448 inhabitants, of whom 199 are in the 
township of Adlingfleet, 9^ miles (S. E.) from Howden. 
This parish is situated on the borders of Lincolnshire, 
between the rivers Ouse and Trent, and contains 4580 
acres, forming a continuation of the great level of Hat- 
field Chase ; the soil is chiefly clay, and, though the 
surface is flat, the scenery is pleasing. The living is a 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 9. 12. li., and 
has a net income of 280 : it is in the patronage of the 
Crown, and the impropriation belongs to Catharine 
Hall, Cambridge. The tithes for the townships of Ad- 
lingfleet, Fockerby, and Haldenby, were commuted for 
land and a money payment, under an inclosure act, in 
1767. The church, which is a small edifice, was re- 
paired in 1828 at an expense of 500. There are two 
places of worship for Methodists. In 1743 Mary Rams- 
den bequeathed the sum of 200 for apprenticing boys 
and educating girls in Fockerby, Norton, Linton, and 
Adlingfleet : a parochial school is carried on ; and at 
Fockerby is a free grammar school. 

ADLINGTON, a township, in the parish of PREST- 
BURY, union and hundred of MACCLESFIELD, N. divi- 
sion of the county of CHESTER, 5 miles (N. by W.) 
from Macclesfield ; containing 1159 inhabitants. Adling- 
ton Hall, a very ancient and curious structure, with 
a garden of cut yew hedges, which has long been the 
residence of the family of Legh, was garrisoned for 
Charles I. in the civil war, and taken by the parliamen- 
tarian forces, on the 14th of Feb. 1645, after a fort- 
night's siege : in the south-east angle is a small domestic 
chapel, handsomely fitted up, licensed by the Bishop of 
Lichfield and Coventry in the 25th of Henry VI. There 
are some valuable mines of coal, and quarries of flag- 
stone. A manorial court is held in May and December, 
at which debts under 40s. are recoverable. 

ADLINGTON, a township, in the parish of STAN- 
DISH, union of CHORLEY, hundred of LEYLAND, N. 
division of the county of LANCASTER, 4 miles (N.) from 
Wigan ; containing 1130 inhabitants. A district church 
was erected in 1838, by Her Majesty's Commissioners, 
containing 629 sittings, of which 33 1 are free : the liv- 
ing is a perpetual curacy, of which the incumbent has a 
grant of 71 per annum, from the Ecclesiastical Com- 
missioners. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 120. 14. 9. 

ADMARSH, a chapelry, in the parish of LANCASTER, 
union of GARSTANG, hundred of LONSDALE, -south of 
the Sands, N. division of the county of LANCASTER, 4| 
miles (E. by N.) from Garstang, on the river Brock. 
The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 44 ; 
patron, Vicar of Lancaster. There are about 22 acres 
of glebe, and a small glebe-house. The church, a 



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neat edifice, was rebuilt in 1835. There is a small 
grammar school ; and a national school for 50 children 
has been erected. 

ADM ASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of BLITH- 
FIELD, union of UTTOXETER, hundred of SOUTH Pi RE- 
HILL, N. division of STAFFORDSHIRE ; containing 59 
inhabitants. 

ADMINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of QUINTON, 
union of SHIPSTON, Upper division of the hundred of 
KIFTSGATE, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 
6^ miles (N. E. by N.) from Chipping-Campden ; con- 
taining 197 inhabitants. 

ADMISTON, or ATHELHAMPTON, a parish, in the 
union of DORCHESTER, hundred of PIDDLETOWN, Dor- 
chester division of DORSET, 6 miles (E. N. E.) from 
Dorchester} containing 74 inhabitants. This place is 
said to have been the principal residence of the Saxon 
kings of Wessex, but there is no satisfactory evidence 
of the truth of that opinion. The living is a rectory, 
with that of Burleston annexed, valued in the king's 
books at 2 ; net income, 200 ; patron, Hon. W. T. 
L. P. Wellesley. The church is a small edifice, repaired 
by Sir Robert Long in 1740, before which it contained 
an apartment, supposed to have been anciently inhabited 
by a rector or custos. 

ADSTOCK (ST. CECILIA), a parish, in the union, 
hundred, and county of BUCKINGHAM, 3 miles (N. W.) 
from Winslow, on the road to the town of Bucking- 
ham ; containing 419 inhabitants. This parish consists 
of 1128 acres of cultivated arable and pasture land, 
inclosed under an act of parliament passed in 1797, 
when an allotment was awarded to the incumbent in 
lieu of tithes. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 13. 16. 3. 5 patron, the Bishop of Lin- 
coln ; net income 235, arising from 300 acres of land. 
In the time of the plague, in 1665, the contagion having 
extended to Buckingham and Winslow, a market was 
held at this place. 

ADSTONE, a chapelry, in the parish of CANONS 
ASHBY, union of TOWCESTER, hundred of GREENS- 
NORTON, S. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 
6f miles (W. N. W.) from Towcester ; containing 196 
inhabitants. This chapelry comprises 1355 acres of 
land by computation, partially undulated, and watered 
by a stream which falls into the river Tow : stone is 
quarried for building. The living is a donative ; patrons, 
the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy. The chapel, 
dedicated to All Saints, is remarkable for the simplicity 
and dignity of its architecture, and is supposed to have 
been formerly dependent on Canans-Ashby, at which 
place the inhabitants still continue to bury. 

ADVENT, or ST. ADVEN, a parish, in the union of 
CAMELFORD, hundred of LESNEWTH, E. division of 
CORNWALL, if mile (S.) from Camelford ; containing 
291 inhabitants. It comprises 3844 acres, of which 
the surface is hilly, and nearly half uncultivated ; the 
soil is slaty, and interspersed with large granite stones : 
the river Camel flows on the northern boundary. There 
are some moorlands in the parish, on which peat and 
turf are procured for fuel. The living is a rectory, not 
in charge, annexed to that of Lanteglos cum Camelford. 

ADWALTON. See DRIGHLINGTON. 

AD WELL (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
THAME, hundred of LEWKNOR, county of OXFORD, if 
mile (S. by E.) from Tetsworth ; containing 46 inhabit- 
16 



ants. It comprises about 500 acres of land, bounded 
on the north-east by the road between Oxford and High 
Wycombe. The living is a discharged rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 4. 13. 9., and in the patronage 
of Mrs. F. Webb : the rectorial tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 111, and 9 are payable to 
the Dean and Canons of Windsor; there are about 15 
acres of glebe. Here is an ancient intrenchment, called 
Adwell Cop, supposed by Dr. Plot to have been con- 
structed by the Danes, about the year 1010. 

ADWICK-LE-STREET (ST. LAWRENCE), a parish, 
in the union of DONCASTER, N. division of the wapen- 
take of STRAFFORTH, and TICKHILL, W. riding of 
YORK ; containing 554 inhabitants, of whom 120 are in 
the township of Hampole, and 434- in that of Adwick-le- 
Street, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Doncaster. This 
place, said to derive the adjunct to its name from its 
situation on a Roman road, is intersected by the great 
northern road, and contains 1543. 3r. 22;?., of which 
595 acres are grass, 924 arable, and 24 wood and plan- 
tation. The village is pleasantly situated on a declivity, 
and watered by a stream that flows eastward to the 
Don. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 4. 13. 4. ; net income, 364 ; patron, John 
Fullerton, Esq. : the glebe consists of 8 acres. The 
church is a neat structure, with a nave, chancel, north 
aisle, and tower, and has several ancient altar tombs, 
richly carved, erected in memory of the Fitzwilliam, 
Washington, and other families. A school was built in 
1835, at an expense of nearly 200, partly by subscrip- 
tion, and partly by a grant from the Education Com- 
mittee ; ten guineas per annum, bequeathed, in 1811, by 
the Rev. W T illiam Hedges, a late incumbent, for the edu- 
cation of children, are now paid to the master. A spring 
of pure water, in the parish, is in some repute for heal- 
ing weak eyes. 

ADWICK-UPON-DEARNE, a parish, in the union 
of DONCASTER, N. division of the wapentake of STRAF- 
FORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, 7 miles 
(W. by S.) from Doncaster; containing 108 inhabitants. 
The parish comprises 1 105a. Ir. 22/j., of which 704 
acres are arable, 385 meadow and pasture, 8 homesteads 
and orchards, and 6 canal ; the surface is varied, and 
the surrounding scenery richly diversified ; and the river 
Dearne, and the Dearne and Dove canal pass through 
the place. The village is beautifully situated on the 
southern acclivity of the picturesque vale of Dearne, 
and near it runs the North-Midland railway. The liv- 
ing is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of 
Wath-upon-Dearne. There was a church here at an 
early period, which in the former part of the reign of 
Henry I. was given to the monastery of St. Oswald of 
Nostell, then newly founded : this edifice, which is the 
present parochial church, still retains its primitive sim- 
plicity, and is the purest specimen remaining in the 
deanery of Doncaster of the original village churches ; 
it has a nave and chancel, with a little shed in which 
two bells are hung. A powerful chalybeate spring was 
discovered on the glebe land in 1820, and is in consider- 
able repute. 

AFF-PIDDLE, or PUDDLE, a parish, in the union 
of WAREHAM and PURBECK, hundred of HUNDRED'S 
BARROW, Wareham division of DORSET, 9 miles (E. by 
N.) from Dorchester ; containing, with Bryant's Puddle 
tything, and the hamlet of Pallington, 507 inhabitants. 



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The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 8. 14. 9- ; patron and impropriator, J. Framp- 
ton, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 354, and the vicarial for one of 46. 10. ; 
the glebe consists of 1^ acre. The pulpit in the church 
bears date 1540, and is beautifully ornamented with 
carvings. Johanna, relict of the Rev. S. L. Milbourne, 
late vicar, bequeathed 150 three per cents., of which the. 
proceeds are applied in aid of a Sunday school ; a day 
school for boys and girls is partly supported by the 
vicar ; and poor boys of the parish are entitled to par- 
ticipate in the benefits of a charity at Moreton, for 
apprenticing children. 

AGDEN, a township, in the parish of MALPAS, 
union of WREXHAM, Higher division of the hundred 
of BROXTON, S. division of the county of CHESTER, 
2f miles (S. E.) from Malpas ; containing 97 inhabit- 
ants. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 63. 

AGDEN, a township, partly in the parish of Ros- 
THERN, but chiefly in that of BOWDON, union of AL- 
TRINCHAM, hundred of BUCKLOW, N. division of the 
county of CHESTER, 5^ miles (N. N. W.) from Nether 
Knutsford ; containing 95 inhabitants. The Duke of 
Bridgewater's canal passes through the township. The 
tithes of that part in the parish of Bowdon have been 
commuted for rent-charges amounting to 32. 13., of 
which 16. 13. are payable to the Bishop of Chester, 
and 16 to the vicar of Bowdon. 

AGELTHORPE, or AGGLETHORPE, a township, in 
the parish of COVERHAM, union of LEYBURN, wapen- 
take of HANG- WEST, N. riding of York, 3^ miles 
(W. S. W.) from Middleham ; containing 195 inhabit- 
ants. It comprises by computation 1090 acres, and 
includes within its limits the places called Ashgill, Tup- 
gill, Brackengill, Giles Alley, Scotescue park, Bird Rid- 
ding, and Coverham. The Cover river, which has its 
source near the great Whernside mountain, here passes 
on the south, and flows north-eastward to the Ure. 
The monks of Coverham had land here, valued at 
1. 6. 8. per annum ; 'and the village, which is situated 
on the northern acclivity of the romantic Coverdale, is 
remarkable for its ancient hall, now a farm-house, which 
once belonged to the Topham family, afterwards to 
the Chaytors, and is at present the property of Mr. 
Ewbank. 

AGLIONBY, a township, in the parish of WARWICK, 
union of CARLISLE, CUMBERLAND ward, E. division of 
CUMBERLAND, 3f miles (E.) from Carlisle ; containing 
137 inhabitants. 

AGNES (ST.), a market-town and parish, in the 
union of TRURO, W. division of the hundred of PYDER, 
and of CORNWALL, 8| miles (N. W. by W.) from Truro, 
and 263 (W.) from London ; containing 7757 inhabitants. 
This place, formerly called Breanic, or Bryanic, is situ- 
ated in an extensive mining district, on the northern 
coast, and is hilly and barren, consisting principally of 
cottages inhabited by miners. The rocks on this part 
of the coast are precipitous, and the character of the 
scenery for the greater part boldly picturesque. On a 
pyramidical rocky eminence, 664 feet above the level of 
the sea, is St. Agnes' beacon, formed out of an ancient 
cairn, or tumulus, which, during the late war with 
France, was kept constantly in readiness to communi- 
cate intelligence in the event of any invasion : it has 
VOL. I. 17 



since that time been greatly diminished by the removal 
of the stone for repairing the fences in the neighbour- 
hood. At the base of the hill are vestiges of a strong 
vallum, supposed to have been constructed by the 
Romans, which anciently extended for nearly two miles 
in a circular direction. The surrounding district was 
formerly worked only for tin, of which the principal 
mine, called " Scale Hole," after having produced an 
immense quantity of ore, was discontinued a few years 
since. Copper-mines were subsequently opened, and 
have been worked with very great success. The port, 
which is a member of that of St. Ives, carries on a trade 
principally with Ireland and Wales, in the exportation 
of copper-ore and fire-clay, and the importation of coal, 
iron, machinery, limestone, and grain. After many 
fruitless attempts, a pier of moorstone, which is here 
called " Trevannance," was constructed by a company 
in 1794, and the harbour has been improved within the 
last few years : it affords safe anchorage to about eight 
or ten vessels of one hundred tons' burthen, but can 
only be entered at high water. A pilchard fishery was 
established in 1802, which affords employment to about 
forty men. The market is on Thursday, and a fair 
takes place on the 30th of April. Courts for the duchy 
are held here annually in October, at which constables 
and other officers are appointed. The living is a vicar- 
age not in charge, united to that of Perranzabuloe : the 
vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
265, and the appropriate, belonging to the Dean and 
Chapter of Exeter, for one of 250. The church is an 
ancient structure, built chiefly of granite, with a small 
spire of the same material. There are places of wor- 
ship for Bryanites, Independents, and Wesleyans. The 
free school, founded by the Rev. St. John Elliott, in 
1760, has a small endowment, arising from funds be- 
queathed by him for charitable uses ; and another school 
is endowed with 5 per annum. Near the site of an 
ancient chapel, in a dingle called Chapelcomb, was the 
famous well of St. Agnes, of which many miraculous 
stories are recorded. Opie, the celebrated painter, was 
born here, in 1761. 

AIGBURTH, a chapelry, in the parish of CHILD- 
WALL, partly in the union of PRESCOTT, and partly in 
that of WEST DERBY, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. 
division of the county of LANCASTER, 3 miles (S. E.) from 
Liverpool; containing 1031 inhabitants. This chapelry, 
beautifully situated on the Mersey river, contains many 
handsome villas, and from the salubrity of the air has 
become the residence of some of the chief merchants of 
Liverpool. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the pa- 
tronage of certain Trustees : the chapel, dedicated to St. 
Anne, was erected in 1837, and is a good edifice in the 
Norman style. A school for boys and girls in connex- 
ion with the Established Church is supported by sub- 
scription. There is a curious mausoleum erected by the 
well-known Dr. Solomon, who had a residence in the 
chapelry. 

AIGHTON, with BAILEY and CHAIGLEY, a town- 
ship, in the parish of MITTON, union of CLITHEROE, 
Lower division of the hundred of BLACKBURN, N. divi- 
sion of the county of LANCASTER, 5 miles (W. by S.) 
from Clitheroe ; containing 1795 inhabitants. Here are 
almshouses, towards the support of which J. Weld, Esq. 
contributes 92 per annum ; also a free school, endowed 
with 10 per annum. 

D 



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AIKE, a township, partly in the parish of ST. JOHN, 
borough of BEVERLEY, but chiefly in that of LOCKING- 
TON, union of BEVERLEY, Bainton-Beacon division of 
the wapentake of HARTHILL, E. riding of YORK, 7 miles 
(N. by E.) from Beverley ; containing 98 inhabitants. 
This place comprises about 630 acres, of which upwards 
of 200 are in the parish of St. John, Beverley : it was 
formerly an island, but by means of draining has been 
connected with the surrounding country, although it is 
still low and swampy. The tithes were commuted for 
land and a money payment, under an inclosure act 
passed in 1771. 

AIKTON (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union of 
WIGTON, CUMBERLAND ward, E. division of CUMBER- 
LAND, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Wigton ; comprising the 
townships of Aikton, Biglands with Gamblesby, Wam- 
pool, and Wiggonby ; and containing 802 inhabitants, 
of whom 318 are in the township of Aikton. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 14. 13. 1^. ; 
net income, 546 ; patron, Earl of Lonsdale. A school 
is endowed by Margaret Hodgson, with houses and land 
valued at 150 per annum, and is free to the poor of 
Aikton, Burgh-upon- Sands, and Beaumont, and to all 
persons of the founder's name. 

AIKTON, YORK. See ACKTON. 

AILBY, a hamlet, in the parish of RIGSBY, Wold 
division of the hundred of CALCEWORTH, parts of LIND- 
SEY, county of LINCOLN ; containing 53 inhabitants. 

AILESWORTH, a hamlet, in the parish of CASTOR, 
union and soke of PETERBOROUGH, N. division of the 
county of NORTHAMPTON, 2f miles (E. by S.) from 
Wansford ; containing 363 inhabitants. 

AINDERBY-MYERS.with HOLTBY, a township, in 
the parish of HORNBY, union of BEDALE, wapentake of 
HANG-EAST, N. riding of YORK, 3^ miles (S. by E.) 
from Catterick ; containing 82 inhabitants. It is situ- 
ated in the vale of a rivulet, and comprises about 879 
acres of land. 

AINDERBY-QUERNHOW, a township, in the 
parish of PICKHILL, union of THTRSK, wapentake of 
HALLIKELD, N. riding of YORK, 5^ miles (W. S. W.) 
from Thirsk ; containing 92 inhabitants. This place 
derives the adjunct to its name from the querns, or 
mill-stones, obtained from the how or hill in the parish : 
it comprises an area of 527a. 18p. The impropriate 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 150, 
payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. 

AINDERBY-STEEPLE (S T . HELEN), a parish, in 
the union of NORTH ALLERTON, wapentake of GILLING- 
EAST, N. riding of YORK ; containing 760 inhabitants, 
of whom 262 are in the township of Ainderby- Steeple, 
3 miles (W. S. W.) from North Allerton. The parish 
comprises the townships of Ainderby-Steeple, Morton, 
Thrintoft, and Warlaby, and consists by measurement 
of 4599 acres ; the township of Ainderby-Steeple extends 
over 1129 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 13. 6. 8., and has a net 
income of 200 ; the patronage and impropriation are 
vested in the Crown. The church is a handsome struc- 
ture, on a bold eminence, and from its lofty tower, 
which may be seen at the distance of 30 miles, the place 
derives the affix to its name. 

AINSTABLE, with RUCKROFT (Sr. MICHAEL), a 
parish, in the union of PENRITH, LEATH ward, E. 
division of CUMBERLAND, 4| miles (N. N. W.) from 
18 



Kirk-Oswald, and 10 miles (N. by E.) from Penrith ; 
comprising 4 17? a. IHp., and containing 501 inhabitants. 
This parish, which is bounded on the west by the river 
Eden, and on the east and south by the Croglin, abounds 
with beautiful scenery, particularly in the vale of Crog- 
lin, and in the vicinity of Nunnery, the seat of Major 
Aglionby, who erected a spacious and elegant mansion 
on the site of a Benedictine convent, founded here by 
William II., the revenue of which at the dissolution was 
18. 18. 8. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 8. 8. 2. ; net income, 225 ; 
patron and impropriator, Major Aglionby. The vicarial 
tithes and all moduses were commuted for land under 
an inclosure act in 1818. The nave of the church was 
rebuilt in 1816, and the chancel soon afterwards. A 
small school is endowed with 8. 15. per annum. Near 
the parsonage-house is a chalybeate spring. John Leake, 
M. D., founder of the Westminster Lying-in Hospital, 
and author of some esteemed medical works, was bora 
here, in 1729. 

AINSWORTH, or COCKEY, a chapelry, in the parish 
of MIDDLETON, union of BURY, hundred of SALFORD, 
S. division of the county of LANCASTER, 3 miles (E. by 
N.) from Bolton-le-Moors j containing 1598 inhabitants. 
This chapelry, which is intersected by the road from 
Bolton to Bury, comprises by measurement about 1200 
acres. A large coal-mine is in operation, and two stone- 
quarries produce excellent material for engine beds and 
for building purposes. There are also two extensive 
factories for the spinning of cotton and weaving by 
power, and works for bleaching, dyeing, and calico- 
printing ; and the Manchester and Bolton railway and 
canal afford facilities to the industry of the place. The 
living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rector of 
Middletou : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 48, and the glebe comprises 55 acres. The 
church, an ancient structure, was formerly surrounded 
by a moat, and stood in the centre of a common which 
was inclosed some years since. There is a place of 
worship for Unitarians. The late Sir Ralph Assheton, 
Bart, gave a piece of ground and a house, now valued at 
about 15 a year, for the maintenance of a schoolmaster ; 
and a national school is chiefly supported by subscrip- 
tion. Roman coins have been found here. 

AINTREE, a township, in the parish of SEFTON, 
union and hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of the 
county of LANCASTER, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Liver- 
pool ; containing 311 inhabitants. 

AIRTON, a township, in the parish of KIRBY-IN- 
MALHAM-DALE, union of SETTLE, W. division of the 
wapentake of STAINCLIFFE and EWCROSS, W. riding 
of YORK, 65 miles (S. E. by E.) from Settle ; containing 
217 inhabitants. This place, which comprises by com- 
putation 2790 acres of rich grazing land, derives its 
name from the river Aire, on which it is situated, and 
which takes its rise in Malham Tarn, a few miles above 
the village. The population is chiefly agricultural, but 
some of the inhabitants find employment in a cotton- 
mill, the property of Mr. Dewhurst. The land is divided 
among several owners, and W. N. Alcock, Esq. is lord 
of the manor : among former proprietors were the 
monks of Bolton, Fountains, and Nostell Priory. There 
are places of worship for Methodists and Quakers, the 
latter built in 1700. Alice Ellis, in 1709, left a house 
and 29 acres of land for apprenticing poor children. 



A I SL 



A K EN 



AISBY, a hamlet, in the parish of HAYDOR, union of 
GRANTHAM, wapentake of WINNIBRIGGS and THREO, 
parts of KESTEVEN, county of LINCOLN j containing 190 
inhabitants. 

AISBY, a hamlet, in the parish and wapentake of 
CORRINGHAM, union of GAINSBOROUGH, parts of LIND- 
SEY, county of LINCOLN ; containing 63 inhabitants. 

AISHOLT, or ASHOLT (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in 
the union of BRIDGWATER, hundred of CANNINGTON, 
W. division of SOMERSET, 7^ miles (W. by S.) from 
Bridgwater; containing 201 inhabitants, and comprising 
by computation 1252 acres. Limestone is quarried, arid 
used for agricultural purposes. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 7. 12. 3|. ; net income, 
280 ; patron, John West, Esq. : the glebe consists of 
60 acres, and there is a good glebe-house attached to 
the benefice. 

AISKEW, a township, in the parish and union of 
BEDALE, wapentake of HANG-EAST, N. riding of YORK, 
5 mile (N. E.) from Bedale ; containing 658 inhabitants. 
This place, which is pleasantly situated on the north 
side of the Bedale beck, comprises by computation 
1950cr. 2r. 9p. There are two places of worship for 
Anabaptists, and one for Roman Catholics ; and a free 
school has a small endowment of 5 per annum, arising 
from land called " School Fields,'' in the township of 
Crakehall, under the will of Timothy Webster. Near 
Leases Hall, a neat mansion, with pleasant grounds, is 
Cloven hill, the supposed site of a battle, and where 
human bones have often been found. 

AISLABY, a township, in the parish of EAGLES- 
CLIFFE, union of STOCKTON, S. W. division of STOCK- 
TON ward, S. division of the county of DURHAM, l mile 
(W. by N.) from Yarm ; containing 128 inhabitants. 
There was anciently a chapel here, dedicated to St. 
Thomas the Martyr, which was founded by William de 
Aslakby (now Aislaby), and Agnes his wife, in 1313 ; and 
the place was for several generations the residence of the 
family of Pemberton, whose mansion has been con- 
verted into an inn and several other tenements. It is 
pleasantly situated on the northern bank of the Tees, 
by which it is separated from Yorkshire. 

AISLABY, orAYSLEYBY, achapelry, in the parish 
and union of WHITBY, E. division of the liberty of 
LANGBAURGH, N. riding of YORK, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) 
from Whitby ; containing 346 inhabitants. The town- 
ship comprises about 1080 acres, abounding in the most 
picturesque scenery, interspersed with several neat man- 
sions : in the neighbourhood are numerous quarries of 
excellent stone, wrought for various purposes, and 
shipped from Whitby, between which place and Picker- 
ing is a communication by railway. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Mrs. R. Boulby, 
with a net income of 87 : the chapel is dedicated to St. 
Margaret. A school, in union with the National Society, 
was established in 1823, and is supported by subscrip- 
tion. About a mile from the village is a fine spring, 
called St. Kilda's well, which runs directly into the river 
Esk, two miles from its source. 

AISLABY, a township, in the parish of MIDDLE- 
TON, union, and W. division of the lythe, of PICKERING, 
N. riding of YORK, l mile (W. N. W.) from Pickering; 
containing 128 inhabitants. This place is on the road 
from Pickering to Helmsley ; the surface is undulated, 
and the scenery pleasingly varied ; there are quarries of 
19 



sandstone for building, and limestone. Aislaby Hall, 
the seat of George Pitch, Esq., is finely situated within 
the limits of the township. 

AISMUNDERBY, with BONDGATE, a township, in 
the parish and liberty of RIPON, W. riding of YORK; 
containing, with Bondgate and Marchingfield, extra 
parochial, 614 inhabitants. It adjoins Ripon on the 
south, and is partly within that borough ; in the imme- 
diate vicinity are several handsome villas, and a little to 
the south lies the hamlet of Quarry Moor, noted for its 
lime-works. The tithes have been commuted for rent- 
charges, amounting to 62, of which 24 are payable 
to impropriators, and 38 to the Dean and Chapter of 
Ripon. A national school, containing 180 boys, is sup- 
ported by subscriptions, out of which the master receives 
a salary of 60 guineas ; and there is also an hospital for 
the support of two aged widows. 

AISTHORPE (ST. PETER), a parish, in the wapen- 
take of LAWRESS, parts of LINDSEY, union, and county, 
of LINCOLN, 6 miles (W. N. W.) from Lincoln ; contain- 
ing 82 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 807 
acres, and is intersected by the road from Lincoln to 
Barton. Stone is quarried for building purposes, and 
for making roads. The living is a discharged rectory, 
with the vicarage of West Thorpe annexed, valued in 
the king's books at 4. 10. ; net income, 289 ; patrons, 
the Milnes family : the glebe consists of an acre and a 
half, with a cottage. The church is a plain edifice, 
erected about 40 years since, and consists of a nave, 
chancel, and tower. 

AKEBAR, a township, in the parish of FINGALL, 
union of LEYBURN, wapentake of HANG-WEST, N. riding 
of YORK, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Middleham ; contain- 
ing 30 inhabitants. It is on an acclivity opposite to 
Fingall, and comprises an area of 760 acres of land, set 
out in farms. 

AKELD, a township, in the parish of KIRK-NEWTON, 
union of GLENDALE, W. division of GLENDALE ward, 
N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) 
from Wooler; containing 182 inhabitants. The village, 
which is small, is pleasantly situated near the river 
Glen, and the road from Wooler to Kirk-Newton. The 
vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
56, and the impropriate for one of 1. 13. Vestiges 
of a burial-place are discernible here, but there are no 
traces of any place of worship. 

AKELY (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the union, hun- 
dred, and county of BUCKINGHAM, 2| miles (N. by E.) 
from Buckingham ; containing 362 inhabitants. This 
parish, according to a survey made in 1794, when the 
common was inclosed, comprises 1232a. Ir. 26/>., of 
which the soil is a stiff clay, with the exception of some 
light land in that part which formed the common. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
6. 2. 4. ; net income, 245 ; patrons, Warden and 
Fellows of New College, Oxford. There was formerly a 
chapel of ease at Stockholt, in the parish. 

AKENHAM (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of BOSMERE and CLAYDON, E. division of SUF- 
FOLK, 4| miles (N. by W.) from Ipswich ; containing 117 
inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory united 
to that of Claydon, valued in the king's books at 
9. 11. 5^. : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 260, and there are 20 acres of glebe, belong- 
ing to the incumbent. 

D<2 



ALBA 



ALBA 




Seal and Arms. 



ALBAN'S (ST.), a borough 
and market-town, having se- 
parate jurisdiction, and the 
head of a union, locally in 
the hundred of CAsmo,orli- 
bertyof ST. ALBAN'S, county 
of HERTFORD, 12^ miles (W. 
by S.) from Hertford, and 20 
(N. W. by N.) from London ; 
containing 8604 inhabitants, 
including those portions of 
the parishes of St. Michael 
and St. Peter which extend 
beyond the limits of the borough. This place, separated 
from the site of the Roman Ferulamium by the small 
river Ver, derived its name and origin from the mag- 
nificent monastery established here by Offa, King of 
Mercia, in commemoration of St. Albanus. the proto- 
Martyr of Britain. Verulam, according to the Roman 
historians, was founded by the Britons, at an earlier 
period than London : it was the chief station of Cassi- 
vellaunus, at the time of the invasion of Caesar, who de- 
scribes it as a place of great military strength, well de- 
fended by woods and marshes, and appears to have 
consisted of rude dwellings constructed of wood, and to 
have been surrounded by a rampart and fosse. In the 
reign of Nero it was accounted a Municipium, or free 
city j arid in that of Claudius it was surprised by Boa- 
dicea, Queen of the Iceni, who slaughtered the chief part 
of the Roman and British inhabitants. After its resto- 
ration, it continued to be a primary station of the 
Romans until their final departure from Britain. During 
their occupation of it, Albanus, an eminent citizen, who 
had been converted to Christianity by Amphibalus, in 
293, boldly refusing to abjure his new religion, was be- 
headed on the hill called Holmhurst, on which spot the 
monastery was erected in 793, for 100 Benedictine 
monks. About the middle of the fifth century, Verulam 
was occupied by the Saxons, and received the name of 
Watlingceaster, from the Roman highway, called Wat- 
ling-street, on which it stood. According to Matthew 
Paris, the present town owes its origin to Ulsinus, or 
Ulsig, the sixth abbot, who, about the year 950, built a 
church on each of the three principal roads leading from 
the monastery, dedicated respectively to St. Stephen, St. 
Michael, and St. Peter, and encouraged the neighbour- 
ing inhabitants to erect houses, by supplying them with 
money and materials. Fritheric, or Frederic, the thir- 
teenth abbot, opposed the march of the Norman con- 
queror, by causing the trees on the road side, near 
Berkhampstead, to be cut down and laid across the 
way ; he was also principally instrumental in exacting 
from that sovereign an oath to observe the ancient laws 
of the realm. William subsequently deprived this 
church of a great portion of its lands, and would have 
destroyed the monastery, but for the interposition of 
Archbishop Lanfranc. The monks and the inhabitants 
had frequent quarrels; and, in the reign of Richard II., 
the insurgents in Wat Tyler's rebellion were aided by 
the latter in besieging the monastery. On their disper- 
sion, the king repaired hither, attended by Judge Tre- 
silian and 1000 soldiers, to try the delinquents, and 
many of the townsmen were executed. The king re- 
mained eight days, on one of which the commons of the 
county assembled by his command, and, in the great 
20 



court of the abbey, swore to be thenceforward faithful 
subjects. A sanguinary battle was fought here on the 
22nd of May, 1455, between Henry VI. and the Duke of 
York, in which the Lancastrians were defeated, their 
leader, the Duke of Somerset, killed, and the king him- 
self made prisoner. On the 17th of February, 1461, 
another engagement took place on Bernard heath, north 
of the town, when Queen Margaret compelled the Earl 
of Warwick to retreat with considerable loss : after this 
action, the town was plundered and much damaged. 
On the introduction of printing into England, about 
1471, a press was put up in the abbey, from which 
issued some of those early specimens that are now so 
eagerly sought for by collectors : the first translation of 
the Bible was also made here. During the civil war 
between Charles I. and the parliament, a party of soldiers, 
under the Earl of Essex, garrisoned the town, and de- 
stroyed the beautiful cross, which was one of those 
erected by Edward I. in memory of his queen. 

The TOWN is situated chiefly on the summit and 
northern declivity of a considerable eminence, and con- 
sists principally of three streets, the abbey church 
standing on the hill near the point where they meet. 
That part of it which forms the old line of the great 
north road is narrow, and contains many ancient 
houses ; but the other parts are spacious and neatly 
built. It is well paved and lighted with gas under a 
local act obtained in 1803, and supplied with water 
from wells in the upper part of the town. By a diver- 
sion of the main road, about three hundred yards to 
the south, the former circuitous and dangerous route 
through the town is avoided ; and on this new line of 
road, which is about two miles in length, some hand- 
some villas, and one of the most commodious inns in 
the county, called the Verulam Arms, have been erected. 
The manufacture of straw-plat, in which about eight 
hundred persons are employed, is the chief occupation 
of the lower class of inhabitants : a silk-mill, occupying 
the site of the abbey-mill, affords employment to three 
hundred young persons ; and in a mill for spinning 
cotton-wicks for candles, formerly applied to the cutting 
and polishing of diamonds, about sixty persons are 
engaged. Coal is conveyed on the canal for the supply 
of the town, from Boxmoor, about six miles distant. 
The market is on Saturday, for corn, straw- plat, and 
provisions : there is a fair on March 25th and 26th, for 
cattle and horses ; and a statute fair is held on Oct. 
llth, and the two following days. 

St. Alban's is styled a BOROUGH in the record of 
Domesday, and is stated to have contained forty-six 
burgesses, who were the demesne men of the abbot, and 
continued under his jurisdiction (with the exception of 
a brief interval in the reigns of Edward II. and III.) 
until the dissolution, when the possessions of the mo- 
nastery were surrendered to the crown ; and the inha- 
bitants were incorporated in the 7th of Edward VI., by 
a charter which was modified in subsequent reigns, and 
confirmed in the 16th of Charles II. By the act of the 
5th and 6th of William IV., cap. 76, the corporation 
bears the title of the "Mayor, Aldermen, and Burgesses," 
and consists of a mayor, four aldermen, and twelve 
councillors, together forming the council of the borough, 
of which the municipal and parliamentary boundaries 
are now the same. The freedom is inherited by the 
eldest sons of freemen (subject to a peculiar modifica- 



ALBA 



ALBA 



tion), or acquired by servitude : the right by birth ac- 
crues, on the death of his father within the borough, 
to the son of a freeman first born within the borough 
after the father has taken up his freedom ; but the 
father may, in his lifetime, to the exclusion of the first, 
confer the right of succeeding him on any other son 
born after he became free : an exception, nevertheless, 
exists in favour of aldermen, whose eldest or chosen son 
may succeed, whether born before or after the father 
has taken up his freedom. The town first received 
the elective franchise in the 35th of Edward I., which 
was suspended from the 5th of Edward III. till the 1st 
of Edward VI., since which time it has continued to 
return two members to parliament. The right of elec- 
tion was formerly vested in the freemen, whether resi- 
dent or not, and in those householders who had been 
six months resident in the borough, paying scot and 
lot ; but by the act of the 2nd of William IV. it has 
been confined to the resident burgesses and the rate- 
payers, the latter 709 in number : the mayor is the 
returning officer. The limits of the borough have been 
extended by the act of the 2nd and 3rd of William IV., 
cap. 64; they formerly comprised, by computation, 308 
acres, and are now estimated to contain 425. The 
mayor, the late mayor, and the recorder, are justices 
of the peace, and hold courts of quarter-session : the 
mayor presides at a court of aldermen, on the first 
Wednesday in every month, for the transaction of pub- 
lic business; and petty-sessions are held every Saturday. 
The court of record, for pleas to the amount of 50, 
has fallen into disuse. A court of requests for the 
recovery of debts under 40s. is held by certain com- 
missioners appointed under an act passed in the 25th 
of George II., every Saturday, the jurisdiction of which 
extends over the borough and liberty. The magistrates 
for the liberty hold quarter-sessions here for that divi- 
sion. The liberty surrounds, and is entirely distinct 
from, the borough, the magistrates of the one having no 
jurisdiction in the other ; it comprises the divisions of 
Barnet, Watford, and St. Alban's, and extends into 
twenty-two parishes. The former town-hall was origi- 
nally the charnel-house of the monastery ; but a hand- 
some and commodious edifice was erected in 1830. 
The ancient prison of the monastery is now appropriated 
to the confinement of criminals committed for the 
borough and liberty, but is ill adapted to the purposes 
of a gaol. 

The venerable ABBEY, rich in lordships and immuni- 
ties, continued to flourish under a succession of forty 
abbots, who enjoyed both spiritual and temporal autho- 
rity, having a palatine jurisdiction similar to that pos- 
sessed by the bishops of Durham and Ely ; they had 
also a precedence from Pope Adrian IV. over all other 
abbots, with an exclusive exemption from the payment 
of Peter's pence, which, according to Camden, they pos- 
sessed the power of collecting throughout the county, 
and applying to their own use. Henry VIII. granted 
the abbey, which, at the dissolution, had a revenue, 
according to Dugdale, of 2102. 7. 1., to Sir Richard 
Lee, but retained the church, since made parochial, 
which Edward VI., in 1553, granted for a pecuniary 
consideration to the mayor and burgesses. The abbey 
is a cruciform structure, six hundred feet in length, and 
consists of a nave, two aisles, choir, presbytery, lady 
chapel, and two transepts, with a large square tower 
21 



rising from the intersection. The choir is separated 
from the nave by St. Cuthbert's screen, which, with the 
elaborately carved screen over the altar, the ceiling 
(partly groined, and partly enriched with Mosaic paint- 
ings), and the tombs of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, 
and Abbot Ramryge, presents a rich and imposing ap- 
pearance. The tower, supported on four arches, the two 
transepts, and a greater part of the choir, were built of 
Roman tiles from the ancient city of Verulam, about the 
year 1077, and exhibit the Norman style of architecture ; 
the remainder, erected about the reign of Henry III., is 
hi the early English style, with sharply pointed arches. 
Many fine brasses, in memory of the abbots, were taken 
by Cromwell's soldiers, and the church was much da- 
maged by the prisoners who were confined in it during 
the parliamentary war. 

The town comprises the parish of St. Alban, or the 
Abbey parish, and parts of the parishes of St. Michael 
and St. Peter. The living of St. Alban s is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 10; net income, 111 ; 
patron and incumbent, Dr. Nicholson, who purchased 
the advowson from the mayor and corporation. A 
lectureship was founded in the church in 1640, by 
Francis Combe, Esq., who endowed it with 10 per 
annum. The living of St. Peter s is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 9. 0. 10. ; net income, 308 ; 
patron, Bishop of Ely. The church, erected by Abbot 
Ulsinus, in 948, has been rebuilt within the last fifty 
years. The living of St. Michael's is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 10. 1. 8.; net income, 300; 
patron and impropriator, Earl of Verulam. The church 
is a small edifice, erected by the same abbot, and con- 
tains, in a niche on the northern side of the chancel, a 
finely sculptured alabaster statue of Lord Bacon, who 
was interred here. There are places of worship for 
Particular Baptists, the Society of Friends, Indepen- 
dents, Wesleyans, and Unitarians. The Free Grammar 
school was erected in or about the year 1569, by the 
mayor and burgesses, under their charter of incorpora- 
tion bestowed by Edward VI. ; and was endowed by 
letters-patent of Elizabeth and James I., granting power 
to the mayor and burgesses to license dealers in wine in 
the borough, from which source it now has an income 
of 45 ; also in 1 595, by Richard Raynshaw, with 37 
acres of land in the parish of St. Peter, let for 25. 4. 
per annum ; and by Richard Platt with a piece of land 
yielding a rental of 1.7.; making, with the dividends 
on 1500 three per cent, reduced annuities, arising 
from accumulated funds, a total income of 157- The 
school-room, adjoining the Abbey church, was for- 
merly the beautiful chapel of the Virgin. Dr. Aubrey 
Spencer, Bishop of Jamaica, and Dr. George Spencer, 
Bishop of Madras, were educated here. There are also 
a few other schools, supported by charity. The alms- 
houses, called Marlborough buildings, containing apart- 
ments for thirty- six persons of both sexes, were built 
and endowed by Sarah, Duchess Dowager of Marlbo* 
rough, in 1736 : they occupy three sides of a quadran- 
gle, on the site of the old manor-house of Newland- 
Squillers ; and the income, arising from property in 
the counties of Warwick and Surrey, now amounts to 
757 per annum. The church lands, appropriated to 
the repairs of the abbey, together with several benefac- 
tions for the same purpose, produce a revenue of 220, 
and there are numerous bequests for the relief of the 



AL BO 



A L B U 



necessitous. The poor law union of St. Alban's com- 
prises eight parishes or places, and contains a population 
of 17,051. 

In the town is a high square brick tower, with a 
house attached, called the Clock house, built by one of 
the abbots in the reign of Henry VIII., and conveyed to 
the corporation in the 29th of Elizabeth ; the house and 
lower part of the tower are let as a shop, and in the 
upper part is a public clock. At the distance of half a 
mile to the south-east, are some fine remains of the 
nunnery of Sopwell, founded in 1140, by Abbot 
Geoffrey de Gorham, and of which the lady Juliana 
Berners was at one time prioress : like the monastery, 
it was built of Roman tiles and bricks, and partly of 
flints. Of two hospitals, founded by the abbots, and 
dedicated respectively to St. Julian and St. Mary de 
Pratis, there is not a single vestige. On the left of 
the road leading to Dunstable, a few fragments of the 
ancient walls of Verulam are still discernible ; and in a 
field adjoining the town, called New England, are some 
hills supposed to have been the site of the camp of 
Ostorius, and thence vulgarly styled Oyster hills. 
There is a mineral spring in a garden near St. Michael's 
bridge. Matthew Paris, one of the most eminent of 
the old English historians, was a monk in the abbey ; 
and among the most distinguished natives of the town 
may be enumerated Alexander Necham, a poet and 
scholastic divine ; Sir John Mancleville, the celebrated 
traveller ; and Sir John King, and Sir Francis Pember- 
ton, two eminent lawyers. Breakspear's farm-house, in 
the vicinity, was the birthplace of Nicholas Breakspear, 
the only Englishman that ever sat in the papal chair ; 
on his elevation he assumed the name of Adrian IV. ; 
he was a great benefactor to the abbey. St. Alban's 
gives the title of Duke to the family of Beauclerc ; and 
the representative of the family of Grimstone enjoys the 
title of Earl of Verulam. 

ALBERBURY, or ABBERBURY (87. MICHAEL), a 
parish, in the union of ATCHAM, partly in the hundreds 
of CAWRSE and DEYTHUR, county of MONTGOMERY 
(North Wales), but chiefly in the hundred of FORD, 
S. division of SALOP, 8^ miles (W.) from Shrewsbury ; 
containing, in the English portion of the parish, which 
includes the township of Alberbury and the chapelry of 
Wollaston, 1065 inhabitants, of whom 638 are in the 
township of Alberbury. This parish, the Welsh name of 
which is Llanvihangel-yn-Ghentyn, is partly bounded 
by the river Severn, and is intersected by the Roman 
Watling-street. There are some remains of a castle, 
built in the reign of Henry II., by Fulk Fitz-Warine, 
who founded an abbey for Black monks of the order of 
Grandmont, vestiges of which may still be traced about 
a mile from the castle : on the suppression of Alien 
priories, Henry VI. gave the site to the college of All 
Souls, Oxford, to which it still belongs. The parish 
comprises 1000 acres : coal is abundant, but none is at 
present worked. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 5. 10. - } net income, 
187 ; patrons and impropriators, Warden and Fellows 
of All Souls' College. The glebe consists of 20 acres. 
A school is supported by subscription ; and about 13 
per annum, the interest of divers benefactions, is dis- 
tributed amongst the poor on Christmas-day. 

ALBOURNE (ST. BARTHOLOMEW), a parish, in the 
union of CUCKFIELD, hundred of TIPNOAK, rape of 
22 



BRAMBER, W. division of SUSSEX, 2^ miles (W. N. W.) 
from Hurst-Pierrepoint ; containing 395 inhabitants, 
and comprising about 1400 acres. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 7. 14. 2., and 
in the gift of John Goring, Esq. : the tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 310, and the glebe 
consists of 10 acres. The church is an ancient struc- 
ture ; the nave is separated from the chancel by a fine 
Norman arch, and a north transept was added a few years 
since by C. Goring, Esq. There are two schools, chiefly 
supported by subscription. Albourne Place is said to 
have been built by Bishop Juxon, who retired hither 
after the death of Charles I., where he resided till the 
Restoration. 

ALBRIGHTON (ST. MARY), a parish (formerly a 
market-town), in the union of SHIFFNALL, Shiffnall 
division of the hundred of BRIMSTREE, S. division of 
SALOP, l t\ miles (N. W.) from Wolverhampton ; con- 
taining 1058 inhabitants, and comprising 3424a. \r. S3p. 
Pepperhill, an ancient mansion of the Shrewsbury 
family, is now converted into a farm-house. The living 
is a vicarage, endowed with nearly the whole of the 
rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at 
5. 10.; net income, 651; patrons, alternately, the 
Haberdashers' Company, and the Governors of Christ's 
Hospital, London : the glebe consists of 27 acres. The 
church, which has partly been rebuilt, has a Norman 
tower, with a small Saxon arch outside ; the chancel is 
ancient, and has a fine eastern window ; in the north- 
east angle, on a monument dated 1504, are effigies of a 
knight of the Talbot family, and of his lady, one of the 
Gifford family. The Duke of Shrewsbury lies buried 
here. A free school is principally supported from the 
tolls of the fairs, which are held on March 5th, May 
23rd, July 18th, and Nov. 9th, for horned cattle, sheep, 
and hogs. 

ALBRIGHTON (Sr. JOHN), a parish, in the union 
of ATCHAM, hundred of PIMHILL, N. division of SALOP, 
4 miles (N.) from Shrewsbury; containing 85 inhabit- 
ants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of 
the Spurrier family ; net income, 52. 

ALBURGH (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
DEPWADE, hundred of EARSHAM, E. division of NOR- 
FOLK, 3^; miles (N. E. by N.) from Harleston ; contain- 
ing 589 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 
1512 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 12 ; net income, 395 5 patron, the Earl of 
Effingham, who must present a member of St. John's 
College, Cambridge : the glebe consists of about 7 acres. 
The church, built partly in the early English, and partly 
in the perpendicular style, consists of a nave and chan- 
cel, with a lofty embattled tower ; the nave is separated 
from the chancel by the remains of a beautiful carved 
screen, formerly highly gilt. Some town lands, left by 
Richard Wright before the reign of Henry VIII., are let 
for about 70, applied in aid of the poor-rate. 

ALBURY (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BISHOP-STORTFORD, hundred of EDWINSTREE, county 
of HERTFORD, 4^ miles (N. W.) from Bishop-Stortfordj 
containing 641 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 7. 9. 7- ; net income, 
264 ; patron and impropriator, Treasurer of St. Paul's 
Cathedral. A pleasure fair is held in July. 

ALBURY (ST. HELEN), a parish, in the union of 
THAME, hundred of BULLINGTON, county of OXFORD, 



ALCE 



AL CE 



3| miles (W. by S.) from Thame; containing, with the 
hamlet of Tiddington, 244 inhabitants. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 9. 2. 8|. ; net 
income, 276 ; patron, Earl of Abingdon. The church 
has been lately rebuilt, principally through the munifi- 
cence of the noble earl, and is fitted up throughout with 
open sittings of handsome old oak. Lady Mary Bertie, 
in 1737, gave a rent-charge of 10 for the instruction 
of poor boys. 

ALBURY (ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a parish, in 
the union of GUILDFORD, Second division of the hun- 
dred of BLACKHEATH, W. division of SURREY, 4 miles 
(E. S. E.) from Guildford ,- containing 1079 inhabitants. 
It comprises 3596a. \7p., and includes the hamlets of 
Brooke and Little London j the sub-soil in general is 
chalk and sand. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 17. 12. 8^., and in the gift of Henry 
Drummond, Esq. : the tithes have been commuted fora 
rent- charge of 482. 10., and there are 78 acres of 
glebe. The church is an ancient structure, in the early 
English style, occupying a picturesque situation in 
Albury park j it contains two singular octangular 
pillars, resting upon circular bases of Sussex marble, 
supposed to have been removed from a Roman temple 
which stood on Blackheath. An additional church has 
recently been erected by Mr. Drummond, a cruciform 
edifice in the later English style. In 1754, William 
Resbridger bequeathed 400 for instructing children, 
purchasing bread for the poor, and other charitable 
purposes. National schools are supported by subscrip- 
tion. The Rev. T. R. Malthus, author of the celebrated 
"Essay on Population," was born here in 1766. 

ALBY (ST. ETHELBERT), a parish, in the union of 
AYLSHAM, hundred of SOUTH ERPINGHAM, E. division 
of NORFOLK, 4f miles (N. by E.) from Aylsham ; con- 
taining 299 inhabitants. This place, which was an- 
ciently called Oslby, is intersected by the road from 
Aylsham to Cromer, and includes the hamlets of Alby 
Common and Alby Hill ; it comprises about 840 acres, 
of which 634 are computed to be arable, 80 pasture, 
and 100 common or heath, inclosed in 1840. The living 
is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at 
7. 11. S., and in the gift of the Earl of Orford : the 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 196, 
and there are 13 acres of glebe, with a small house. 
The church is in the early English and decorated 
styles. 

ALCESTER, a liberty, in the parish of ST. JAMES, 
borough of SHAFTESBURY, locally in the hundred of 
MoNCKTON-up-WiMBORNE, county of DORSET j con- 
taining 334 inhabitants. 

ALCESTER (ST. NICHO- 
LAS), a market-town and 
parish, and the head of a 
union, in the Alcester divi- 
sion of the hundred of BAR- 
LICHWAY, S. division of 
the county of WARWICK, 
15 miles (W. S. W.) from 
Warwick, and 103 (N. W. 
by W.) from London ; con- 
taining 2399 inhabitants. 
The name of this place is a 
Seal and Arms. contraction of Alnceastre, 

denoting its situation on the river Alne, and together 
23 




with its position on the line of the Ikeneld-street 
(which may still be traced within a mile to the north- 
west), and the discovery of numerous relics of antiquity, 
affords indubitable evidence of its having been a Roman 
station, which by most antiquaries has been identified 
with the Alauna of the Itineraries. In the time of the 
Saxons it was a place of great importance, and a royal 
residence j and the inhabitants are described by Cap- 
grave as given to luxury and viciousness from an 
abundance of worldly wealth. Egwin, third bishop of 
Huicca, who first preached Christianity here, founded 
the abbey of Evesham, and at a general synod held at 
this place, at which were present Bertwald, Archbishop 
of Canterbury, and Wilfred, Archbishop of York, the 
endowments of that house were confirmed. Alcester is 
said to have been formerly of much greater extent than 
at present, and to have contained three parochial 
churches ; which opinion is corroborated by the dis- 
covery of human skeletons, and numerous foundations 
of ancient buildings, in that part of the parish called 
the Blacklands, now an extensive meadow, lying be- 
tween the present town and the bridge over the-Alne, to 
which, in all probability, it formerly extended j and also 
by the site of a monastery, founded in 1140, by Ralph 
de Boteler, for Benedictine monks, afterwards made a 
cell to the abbey of Evesham, and valued, at the disso- 
lution, at 101. 14. per annum. The remains have 
been converted into a farm-house, and are situated 
about half a mile to the north-east of the town, in 
the centre of which, according to Leland, they originally 
stood. In the reign of Henry I. the place was a free 
borough, and in that of Henry II. it was rated, among 
the other boroughs in the county, at four marks as a 
yearly aid. In the 21st of Edward I., Sir Walter de 
Beauchamp, lord of a moiety of the manoi;, obtained 
the grant of an annual fair for eight days, to begin on 
the eve of St. Giles ; which being found inconvenient, 
it was transferred to the eve of St. Faith by another 
charter in the 30th of that monarch's reign. In the 
28th of the same reign he also received a grant of free 
warren in all his demesne lands here and elsewhere. 
His son Walter, in the 13th of Edward II., obtained a 
charter for another fair, to be held annually for eight 
days, beginning on the eve of St. Barnabas the Apostle ; 
and his brother and successor, Giles, procured in the 
14th of Edward III., a charter to fortify and embattle 
his manor-house here. His great-grandson, Sir John 
Beauchamp, purchased the other moiety of the manor 
from the family of Botreaux, and having thus become 
lord of the whole, obtained, in the 25th of Henry VI., 
a charter confirming the privilege of a court leet with 
waifs and estrays, a market, and all other privileges 
previously enjoyed by his predecessors. 

The TOWN is pleasantly situated on the river Arrow, 
at its confluence with the Alne, in a fertile and richly- 
cultivated vale, surrounded with finely-wooded emi- 
nences ; and consists of one principal street, from which, 
near the market-place, others diverge in the direction of 
the roads to Birmingham, Stratford-upon-Avon, and 
Evesham. The houses are in many instances well built, 
and of handsome appearance, occasionally interspersed 
with ancient buildings having projecting upper stories, 
and many modern brick-built cottages. The principal 
manufacture is that of needles and fish-hooks, in which 
from 500 to 600 persons are employed. The market, 



AL C I 



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which is well supplied with corn, is on Tuesday ; and 
the fairs, principally for cattle, horses, and sheep, are on 
Jan. 26th, March 23rd, May 18th, July 27th, Oct. 
18th, and Dec. 7th. The town is within the jurisdiction 
of the county magistrates ; and a court leet is held 
annually in November, when bailiffs and constables are 
appointed by the steward of the manor. The town- 
hall, situated in the centre of the market-place, is a 
plain building, of which the lower part, appropriated to 
the use of the market, is of stone, supported on circular 
arches and round Tuscan columns. The parish com- 
prises by measurement 1200 acres of good fertile land, 
and extends to the Ridge Way, which separates a por- 
tion of the county from that of Worcester. The LIVING 
is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at 
14. 18. 10., and in the gift of the Marquess of Hert- 
ford : the income arises from land granted in lieu of 
tithes, comprising 90 acres, valued at 215 per annum. 
The church, formerly dedicated to St. Andrew, was 
built in the beginning of the thirteenth century ; but of 
the original structure only the tower remains, the battle- 
ments of which, together with the body of the church, 
were rebuilt in 1732, when the church was dedicated to 
St. Nicholas ; it has been lately rendered more commo- 
dious by extensive galleries erected at the expense of the 
rector. The exterior preserves a characteristic appear- 
ance, harmonizing with the tower, to which the interior, 
with a flat ceiling supported on round Tuscan pillars 
separating the aisles from the nave, forms a striking 
contrast. Near the altar is a tomb with recumbent 
effigies of Sir Fulke Greville and his lady, finely sculp- 
tured and coloured, and an elegant monument to the 
second Marquess of Hertford, in which his effigy, in a 
sitting posture, is beautifully represented in white mar- 
ble. Two chantries were formerly existing in the church ; 
one in a chapel of " Our Lady," founded by one of the 
Botelers of Oversley ; and the other by John, son of 
Giles de Beauchamp, in the 36th of Edward III. There 
are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, 
Independents, Wesleyans, and Unitarians. The free 
school, which is open to all the boys of the parish, was 
instituted in 1592, by Walter Newport, of Goldney, in 
the county of Northampton, who endowed it with 400, 
producing 20 per annum, which is paid to the master, 
who has also a house and garden rent-free : there are 
but few boys on the foundation. Certain almshouses 
are endowed with land for eight poor women, who have 
a weekly allowance of two shillings and four-pence, and 
receive from Lady Warwick's charity a black gown 
annually ; and there are also other charitable bequests 
for apprenticing children and for distribution. The 
poor law union of Alcester comprises 18 parishes and 
places in the county of Warwick, and 4 in that of Wor- 
cester ; and contains a population of 16,833. Among 
the Roman antiquities found in the town and its im- 
mediate vicinity are numerous urns, coins, tessellated 
pavements, and other relics. Beauchamp's Court, the 
ancient manor-house, now a farm, about a mile and a 
half distant, gives the title of Baron to the Earl of 
Warwick. 

ALCISTON, a parish, in the union of WEST FIRLE, 
hundred of ALCISTON, rape of PEVENSEY, E. division of 
SUSSEX, 7? miles (E. S. E.) from Lewes ; containing 
275 inhabitants. It comprises about 2100 acres, a por- 
tion of which consists of chalky downs. The living is a 
24 



discharged vicarage, united by act of council in 1840 to 
Selmeston, valued in the king's books at 6 ; net in- 
come, 50 ; patron, the Prebendary of Heathfield in 
the Cathedral of Chichester for two turns, and the Dean 
and Chapter for one; the latter are the impropriators. 
The church has some remains of Norman architecture, 
with an admixture of the early English style. 

ALCOMBE, a hamlet, in the parish of DUNSTER, 
union of WILLITON, hundred of CARHAMPTON, W. 
division of DORSET ; containing 259 inhabitants. 

ALCONBURY (Sr. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a parish, 
in the hundred of LEIGHTONSTONE, union and county 
of HUNTINGDON, 4^ miles (N. W.) from Huntingdon; 
containing 823 inhabitants, and comprising about 4000 
acres. A fair is held on Midsummer-day. The living 
is a discharged vicarage, with Alconbury-Weston an- 
nexed, valued in the king's books at 8. 6. 1.; net 
income, 162; patrons and appropriators, Dean and 
Chapter of Westminster. The glebe comprises 186 acres. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 

ALCONBURY-WESTON, a parish, in the hundred 
of LEIGHTONSTONE, union and county of HUNTINGDON, 
6 miles (N. W.) from Huntingdon; containing 491 
inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of 
Alconbury. 

ALCUMLOW, with MORETON, a township, in the 
parish of ASTBURY, union of CONGLETON, hundred of 
NORTHWICH, S. division of the county of CHESTER ; 
containing 148 inhabitants. 

ALDBOROUGH (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of ERPINGHAM, hundred of NORTH ERPINGHAM, E. 
division of NORFOLK, 6 miles (N.) from Aylsham ; con- 
taining 293 inhabitants. It comprises 788a. 9p., of 
which 434 acres are arable, 287 pasture and meadow, 
and 20 woodland. A stock and pleasure fair is held on 
June 22nd. The living is a discharged rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 8, and in the gift of Lord Suffield : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
192. 10., and the glebe consists of 26 acres, with a 
good house. The church, chiefly in the decorated style, 
contains several neat memorials to the family of Gay, 
and some sepulchral brasses to the Herewards, from 
whom the Gays were descended. 

ALDBOROUGH, or AL- 
DEBURGH (ST. PETER AND 
ST. PAUL), a sea-port and 
parish (formerly a repre- 
sentative borough and mar- 
ket-town), having separate 
jurisdiction, in the union, 
and locally in the hundred, 
of PLOMESGATE, S. division 
of SUFFOLK, 25 miles (N. 
E. by E.) from Ipswich, and 
94 (N. E.) from London ; 
containing 1557 inhabitants. 
This place takes its name from its situation on the river 
Aide, and was formerly of very considerable extent and 
importance, possessing many valuable privileges. Owing 
to the encroachment of the sea (which, within the last 
century, has destroyed the market-place, with an entire 
street and a great number of houses), it has been re- 
duced to an inconsiderable town ; but from the salubrity 
of the air and the convenience of the shore for sea- 
bathing, it has lately become a place of fashionable 




Seal and Arms. 



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A LD B 



resort during the summer ; baths for the accommoda- 
tion of visiters have been erected, and machines are in 
attendance on the beach. The town is situated in a 
pleasant vale, rather below the level of high-water mark, 
having the river Aide on the north, and on the south 
the navigable river Ore, which flows from Orford to this 
place : it is sheltered by a steep hill, the extended 
summit of which forms a magnificent terrace, affording 
a delightful promenade, and a beautifully diversified 
prospect, embracing an extensive view of the North Sea. 
The strand, to which the descent from the town is 
gradual, consists of firm sand, favourable for bathing 
and walking. At the southern extremity of the main 
street, which is nearly a mile in length, are a battery, 
on which, during the late war, two eighteen-pounders 
were mounted, another of five guns, and a martello 
tower, for the protection of the coast. The old houses 
are in general ill-constructed, but those erected by 
families residing here during the season, or for the ac- 
commodation of visiters, are well built and respectable ; 
among which is an elegant marine villa, in the Italian 
style, built by the late Leveson Vernon, Esq. There is 
a public subscription library, situated on the Head ; a 
neat and commodious theatre is open for a few weeks 
during the season ; and assemblies are held occasionally 
at the principal inns. The trade of the port consists 
chiefly in the exportation of corn, and the importation 
of coal and timber, in which forty-six vessels, averaging 
fifty-two tons' burthen, are employed. The custom- 
house is a neat and convenient building near the quay ; 
and the harbour, which is safe and commodious, attracts 
a number of seafaring people and fishermen, by whom 
the town is principally inhabited. Many of these are 
Trinity-house pilots, who form themselves into small 
associations, and purchase swift-sailing cutters, in which 
they traverse the North Sea, frequently approaching the 
coast of Norway, in search of vessels requiring assist- 
ance. The chief employment of the other inhabitants 
consists in the taking and drying of herrings and sprats, 
the latter of which are found here in profusion, and ex- 
ported to Holland : soles and lobsters of superior flavour 
are taken also in abundance. The market, formerly on 
Wednesday and Saturday, has been discontinued ; the 
fairs are held on March 1st and May 3rd. 

Aldborough claims to be a borough by prescription : 
the earliest charter extant was granted by Henry VIII. 
in 152Q, since which it has received several others, the 
last and governing charter being granted by Charles I. 
in 1637. The officers of the corporation are two bailiffs, 
ten capital and twenty-four inferior burgesses, a recorder, 
town-clerk, two chamberlains, two serjeants-at-mace, 
and others ; and the bailiffs, late bailiffs, and recorder 
are justices of the peace for the borough, which is co- 
extensive with the parish. The revenue arises princi- 
pally from the proceeds of the town marshes, comprising 
188 acres of land used for depasturing cattle, which 
were purchased in 1610, and are vested in trustees. 
The town-hall is an ancient building of timber, under 
which is the common gaol, consisting of a single cell, 
for the confinement of disorderly persons ; the borough 
magistrates generally commit to the county gaol. The 
borough first exercised the elective franchise in the 
13th of Elizabeth, from which time, until its disfran- 
chisement by the Reform Act, in the 2nd of William IV., 
it returned two members to parliament : the right of 
VOL. I. 25 



election was vested in the bailiffs and burgesses not 
receiving alms, and the bailiffs were the returning offi- 
cers. The parish comprises by measurement 1150 
acres ; it contains a small portion of good arable land, 
but it chiefly consists of heath, and of land laid out in 
sheep-walks. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 33. 6. 8., with a net income of 
220 : it is in the patronage of F. J. V. Wentworth, 
Esq., and there is a manor of 13 acres attached to it. 
The church is an ancient structure of flint and freestone, 
standing on the summit of a hill at the northern ex- 
tremity of the town, with a square embattled tower 
surmounted by a turret, affording an excellent land-mark 
for mariners. There are places of worship for Particular 
Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans. A national 
school is supported by subscription, and the rental of a 
quay, or wharf, on the river Ore, is applicable to the 
purposes of education. This is the birth-place of the 
poet Crabbe. 

ALDBOROUGH (ST. ANDREW), a parish, partly in 
the wapentake of HALLIKELD, N. riding, but chiefly in 
the Lower division of the wapentake of CLARO, W. riding 
of YORK 5 comprising the ancient borough towns of 
Aldborough and Boroughbridge, and the townships of 
Minskip, Rocliff, and Upper and Lower Dunsforth, part 
of that of Hurnberton with Milby, and the whole of 
Ellenthorpe in the N. riding ; and containing 2473 in- 
habitants, of whom 615 are in the township of Aldbo- 
rough, 16| miles (N. W. by W.) from York, and 205 
(N. N. W.) from London. The town, which is situated 
upon the southern bank of the river Ure, and upon the 
line of the northern Watling-street, was the celebrated 
and important Roman station called Isurium Brigantium, 
and received from the Saxons the name of Eald-burgh, 
denoting its antiquity even in their time. Its destruc- 
tion is attributed to the Danes, by whom it was sacked 
and burnt to the ground, about the year 870. The 
elective franchise was granted by Philip and Mary, in 
1558 ; but by the Reform Act the borough was deprived 
of the privilege of returning members. The right of 
election was vested in the inhabitants paying scot and 
lot, in number about sixty ; and the bailiff, who was 
appointed by the electors, was the returning officer. 
The town is now only a rural village, beautifully situated. 
The parish comprises 4600 acres ; the scenery is varied, 
and in some points picturesque. Aldborough Lodge, the 
seat of Basil T. Woodd, Esq., J. P., is a handsome resi- 
dence, in grounds tastefully laid out. 

The LIVING is a discharged vicarage, and is a peculiar 
of the Dean and Chapter of York, valued in the king's 
books at 9. 19. 5.; net income, 368 ; patrons and 
appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Ripon. The 
tithes of the township of Aldborough were commuted 
for land and a money payment, by an inclosure act, in 
1808. The church, supposed to have been built out of 
the ruins of Isurium, has several antique monuments, 
and on the outside is a figure of Mercury, 2| feet in 
length. There is a place of worship for Independents ; 
and a school in connexion with the National Society is 
supported by subscription. The foundations of the 
walls of the ancient city, which included a quadrilateral 
area of 2500 yards, may still be traced. Near the centre 
are vestiges of a mount, called the Borough Hill, re- 
moved in 1783, and believed, from the remains then 
discovered, to have been the site of a Roman temple ; 

E 



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and about a hundred paces from the south wall is a 
semicircular outwork, named Studforth, 200 feet long, 
with a slope of 30 feet, forming a lofty terrace, on the 
south side of the town. Many Roman remains, consist- 
ing of tessellated pavements, military weapons, coins, 
&c., have at various times been discovered, and are pre- 
served in the pleasure-grounds of Aldborough Lodge, 
where are remains of a Roman encampment ; and in 
the village is a beautiful tessellated pavement, under a 
wood covering. 

ALDBOURN (ST. MICHAEL), a parish (formerly a 
market-town), in the union of HUNGERFORD, hundred 
of SELKLEY, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and Northern, 
divisions of WILTS, 6 miles (N. E.) from Marlborough; 
containing 1556 inhabitants. The name is compounded 
of the Saxon terms Aid, old, and bourne, a brook. Aid- 
bourn anciently gave name to a royal chase, granted by 
Henry VIII. to Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, 
which for a long period served only as a rabbit-warren, 
but is now inclosed and cultivated. Previously to the 
battle of Newbury, in the reign of Charles I., a sharp 
skirmish took place here between the parliamentarian 
forces and the royalists. In 1760, a fire consumed 
seventy-two houses ; and, in 1817, twenty were destroyed 
by a similar calamity. The parish comprises 8495a. 3r. 
19p., of which 5037 acres are arable, 839 meadow and 
pasture, and 226 woodland ; the surface is generally 
undulated, and the quality of the soil is various, pre- 
senting a sand-gritty substance together with red clayey 
gravel and black turfy mould, and in some places chalk 
and flint. The town, situated in a fertile valley, has a 
willow-factory for bonnet frames, in which about 100 
females are employed. The living is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 26. 6. 3. ; patron, Bishop of 
Salisbury ; appropriators, Dean and Chapter of Win- 
chester. The great tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 1475, and the small tithes for one of 
210 : the rectorial glebe comprises about 120 acres ; 
the vicarial consists chiefly of allotments made under an 
act of parliament, and is valued at 262 per annum. 
The church, an ancient structure, exhibiting portions in 
the Norman style, has a tower erected at the cost of 
John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster ; and the southern 
part of the vicarage-house is supposed to be the remains 
of a hunting seat, which belonged to him. There is a 
place of worship for Wesleyans. Near a farm-house, 
called Pierce's Lodge, are vestiges of an ancient British 
encampment ; and in the neighbourhood may be seen 
various artificial mounds of earth. 

ALDBROUGH (ST. BARTHOLOMEW), a parish, in the 
union of SKIRLAUGH, Middle division of the wapentake 
of HOLDERNESS, E. riding of YORK ; comprising the 
townships of Aldbrough, Newton-East, and Newton- 
West, with part of Great and Little Cowden ; and con- 
taining 1119 inhabitants, of whom 845 are in the town- 
ship of Aldbrough, ll miles (N. E. by E.) from Hull. 
The township of Aldbrough comprises upwards of 4000 
acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and one-third is 
pasture ; the soil, generally, is strong and tenacious ; 
and bricks and tiles are manufactured. The village, 
which is large and convenient, is pleasantly situated on 
an eminence about a mile from the sea, and includes 
some good houses and shops, and a large hotel, recently 
built, for the accommodation of visitors who resort 
hither for sea-bathing. The living is a discharged 
26 



vicarage, valued in the king's books at 13. 15., and in 
the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of 350 : 
the rectorial tithes for the lordship of Aldbrough were 
commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1764. The 
church, the oldest in Holderness, is a large and ancient 
edifice, and contains a circular stone, bearing this Saxon 
inscription : " Ulf commanded this church to be built 
for the soul of Hanum and Gunthral." Ulf was lord of 
the place, and had a castle here, every vestige of which, 
except the moat, has been destroyed. The chantry on 
the north side of the chancel contains a very splendid 
monument of Sir John de Melsa and his lady ; the 
Knight was governor of the city of York from 1292 to 
1296, and a great warrior; his massive helmet is pre- 
served. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The 
rental of certain land, left by Mr. Towry, is appropriated 
to the instruction of children and relief of the poor; 
and three inhabitants of the parish are eligible to Tym- 
peron's almshouses at Beverley. Slight traces of a 
Roman road are discernible in the vicinity. 

ALDBROUGH, a township, in the parish of STAN- 
wiCK-Sx. JOHN, union of RICHMOND, wapentake of 
GILLING-WEST, N. riding of YORK, 7 miles (W. S. W.) 
from Darlington ; containing 544 inhabitants. It is a 
large and pleasant village, situated on a small rivulet, 
and the lands in the vicinity are fertile and productive." 
Carlton Hall, a mile to the north, was formerly the seat 
of S. B. M. Barrett, Esq., who built a school here, which 
is supported by Lord Prudhoe, lord of the manor, and 
other subscribers. There is a place of worship for Wes- 
leyans. 

ALDBURY (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in 
the union of BERKHAMPSTEAD, hundred of DACORUM, 
county of HERTFORD, 3 miles (E. by N.) from Tring ; 
containing 790 inhabitants, and comprising by measure- 
ment 2102 acres. The village is pleasantly situated at 
the foot of the Chiltern Hills, the summits of which are 
crowned with thick plantations ; and the Tring station 
of the London and Birmingham railway is only about a 
mile distant from the church. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 20. 8. 6|., and in the 
patronage of the Countess of Bridgewater : the tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 374, and the 
glebe comprises 32 acres. The church is in the early 
style of English architecture, and contains an altar- 
tomb of an armed knight, in a recumbent posture, and 
his lady ; also another, with brasses, to a knight and 
his lady, and their nine sons and three daughters ; both 
executed in the richest style of ancient sculpture. There 
are two places of worship for Baptists. Several schools 
are supported ; and the poor have the produce of some 
bequests left for their relief. 

ALDCLIFFE, a township, in the parish of LAN- 
CASTER, hundred of LONSDALE, south of the Sands, N. 
division of the county of LANCASTER, l mile (S. W.) 
from Lancaster; containing 111 inhabitants. 

ALDEBURGH. See ALDBOROUGH. 

ALDEBY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
LODDON and CLAVERING, hundred of CLAVERING, E. 
division of NORFOLK, 3 miles (N. E.) from Beccles ; 
containing 496 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south 
by the navigable river Waveney, which separates it 
from the county of Suffolk ; and comprises 3043 acres 
by admeasurement. The living is a perpetual curacy ; 
net income, 120; patrons and appropriators, Dean and 



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ALDE 



Chapter of Norwich. The church, a cruciform structure, 
with a south chapel, is partly in the early and partly in 
the perpendicular style ; the entrance to the west is 
through a rich Norman doorway j the tower rises be- 
tween the nave and chancel. A national school was 
erected in 1840. 40, the rental of land, are annually 
distributed among the poor. Here was a small priory, 
a cell to the Benedictine abbey of Norwich, which, at the 
dissolution, was given by Henry VIII. as part of the 
endowment of that cathedral. 

ALDENHAM (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in 
the union of WATFORD, hundred of CASHIO, or liberty 
of ST. ALBAN'S, county of HERTFORD, 2f miles (N. E. 
by E.) from Watford ; containing, with the hamlet of 
Theobald Street, 1662 inhabitants. The living is a vicar- 
age, valued in the king's books at 24, and in the gift 
of the Trustees of P. Thellusson, Esq. : the impropriate 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 778, 
and the vicarial for 110. The church is in the early 
English style, and contains some highly ornamented 
screen- work, the effigies of two females in stone, and an 
enriched font. The free grammar school was founded 
and endowed in 1599, by Richard Platt, citizen of Lon- 
don, for sixty children, to be chosen from among the 
poor of Aldenham and the families of freemen of tbe 
Brewers' Company, London ; and, in default of the full 
number of scholars from Aldenham, from the poor of 
the adjacent parishes, the children of the founder's name 
and kin to have the preference. In consequence of a 
great -improvement in the value of the property, the 
master and wardens of the company, who were consti- 
tuted the governors, decided upon extending its benefits ; 
and the present buildings, called the " Upper and Lower 
Schools," were erected in 1825, the latter school being 
designed for the sons of farmers and labourers of Alden- 
ham, to be taught on the national system. The same 
munificent benefactor also endowed six almshouses ; 
and a school, established in 1826, is supported by Lady 
Pole. Elizabeth Brown, in the 16th year of Charles I., 
bequeathed a rent-charge of 15, which is distributed at 
Christmas, in coal and clothing, among the poor. 

ALDERBURY (S T . MARY), a parish, and the head 
of a union, in the hundred of ALDERBURY, Salisbury 
and Amesbury, and S. divisions of WILTS, 3 miles (S. 
E. by E.) from Salisbury ; containing, with Farley and 
Pitton chapelries, 1440 inhabitants. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Treasurer 
of Sarum, with a net income of 162 : the great tithes 
were commuted for land and an annual money payment, 
under an inciosure act, in 1803. At Farley and Pitton, 
in the parish, are chapels of ease. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans ; also a small endowed free 
school. The Rev. Gabriel Thistlethwaite, by deed in 
1708, gave ten acres of land at Whaddon in the vicinity, 
now let for 15 per annum, of which 10 are appro- 
priated for the benefit of the poor of Alderbury and 
Whaddon ; and a rent-charge of 5, under the will of 
James Ely, is occasionally applied to the apprenticing 
of children. The poor law union of Alderbury com- 
prises 22 parishes or places, and contains a population 
of 14,171. A monastery formerly existed at Ivy Church, 
in the parish, the site of which is now occupied by a 
modern residence. 

ALDERFORD (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, 
in the union of ST. FAITH'S, hundred of EYNSFORD, 
27 



E. division of NORFOLK, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from 
Reepham ; containing 44 inhabitants. This parish, 
bounded on the south by the river Wensum, and inter-' 
sected by the road from Norwich to Reepham, com- 
prises 43 la. l6p., chiefly arable. The living is a dis- 
charged rectory, with the vicarage of Attlebridge con- 
solidated, valued in the king's books at 4. 6. 8. ; 
patrons, Dean and Chapter of Norwich. The tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 137, and the glebe 
consists of 7 acres, with a small cottage. The church 
is^ in the early, decorated, and later English styles, and 
consists of a nave and chancel, with a square tower ; 
the font is curiously and elaborately sculptured. 

ALDERHOLT, a tything, in the parish and hundred 
of CRANBORNE, union of WIMBORNE and CRANBORNE, 
Wimborne division of DORSET ; containing 404 inha- 
bitants. 

ALDERLEY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of MACCLESFIELD, N. division of the 
county of CHESTER, 6 miles (W. N. W.) from Maccles- 
field ; containing 1538 inhabitants, of whom 455 are in 
the township of Upper Alderley, 679 in that of Lower 
Alderley, and 404 in that of Great Warford. This 
parish comprises by computation 6009 acres of fertile 
land ; the surface is greatly diversified, and towards the 
north-east the ground rises gradually, forming an eleva- 
tion called Alderley Edge, which terminates abruptly, 
and commands an extensive view. Alderley Park, the 
seat of Lord Stanley, forms an interesting feature in the 
landscape ; in the grounds is a fine sheet of water, 
called Radnor Mere, a wood near which contains some 
of the finest beech trees in England. A few of the in- 
habitants are engaged in weaving for the manufacturers 
of the neighbouring: towns. The branch of the Man- 
chester and Birmingham railway from Stockport to 
Crewe passes through the parish. The living is a rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 14. 10. 10.; net 
income, 514; patron, Lord Stanley. There are places 
of worship for Wesleyans, and one for Baptists at Great 
Warford. An ancient school-house in the churchyard, 
some time after its erection, was endowed with 250, 
which has been placed at interest in the hands of Lord 
Stanley, who pays tbe master 10 per annum ; and 
there is also another school, which is principally sup- 
ported by his lordship. On the high ground of Aider- 
ley Edge is a fine spring, called the Holy Well. The 
title of Baron Stanley, of Alderley, was created in 1839. 

ALDERLEY (ST. KENELME), a parish, in the union 
of CHIPPING-SODBURY, Upper division of the hundred 
of GRUMBALD'S-ASH, W. division of the county of 
GLOUCESTER, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Wotton-under- 
Edge ; containing 174 inhabitants. The village is plea- 
santly situated on an eminence between two streams 
which unite and fall into the river Severn at Berkeley, 
and commands an extensive and interesting view to the 
south and south-west. There is a manufactory of cloth 
which affords employment to between one and two 
hundred persons. The living is a discharged rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 11. 4. 7., and in the 
gift of R. H. B. Hale, Esq.: the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 155. 5. 8., and there are 
about 25 acres of glebe. The Rev. Potter Cole was, in 
1730, presented to this benefice, which he held till the 
year 1800, Cornua ammonis and other fossils are found. 
Sir Matthew Hale, lord chief justice in the reign of 

E 2 



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Charles II., was born here, Nov. 1st, 1609, and lies 
interred in the churchyard. 

ALDERMASTON, or ALDMERSTON (ST. MARY), a 
parish (formerly a market-town), in the union of BRAD- 
FIELD, hundred of THEALE, county of BERKS, 10 miles 
(S. W. by W.) from Reading ; containing 662 inhabit- 
ants. This place was distinguished by various military 
operations in the civil war. The royal army under the 
command of Col. Gage, on its way from Oxford to Basing 
House in 1643, halted at the village : on its return, 
finding the enemy in possession of the place, the troops 
were ordered to march by a different route. The Earl 
of Essex was here with his army in the same year, and 
proceeded hence by Padworth and Bucklebury heath to 
Newbury, immediately before the second battle fought 
near that town. The parish comprises 368Qa. 6p., and 
is intersected by the river Kennet. Fairs are held on 
May 6th, July 7th, and Oct. llth. The living is a 
peculiar, in the gift of the lord of the manor, valued in 
the king's books at 12. 12. 8^. The tithes were for- 
merly appropriated to the priory of Sherborne, subject 
to the payment of a small quit-rent to Queen's College, 
Oxford ; but since the reign of Elizabeth they have be- 
longed to the lord of the manor ; they have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 535. The church is an 
ancient structure, and contains several fine old monu- 
ments of the families of Orchard, De la Mere, and Fos- 
ter. The Rev. Robert Dixon, an incumbent, built four 
almshouses for poor widows, in 1706; and there is a 
national school. 

ALDERMINSTER (S T . MARY), a parish, partly in 
the Upper division of the ,-hundred of OSWALDSLOW, 
but chiefly in the Upper .division of the hundred of 
PERSHORE, xmion of STRA,TFORD-UPON-AVON, Blockley 
and E. divisions of the county of WORCESTER, of which 
it is a detached portion, surrounded by Warwickshire, 
5 miles (S. S. E.) from Stratford ; containing 508 in- 
habitants. The pai-ish comprises by computation 3000 
acres ; it is bounded on the south-west by the river 
Stour, and has a great variety of soil. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 7 ; 
the patronage and impropriation belong to the Crown. 
The great tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
188. 4. 6., and those of the incumbent for 160. 19. 6. ; 
the glebe comprises 20 acres in this parish, and 3^ acres 
in that of Bengworth, near Evesham. The church is a 
curious cruciform edifice, with a low tower ; the nave is 
in the Norman style. 

ALDERNEY, an island, dependent on, and under 
the jurisdiction of, the states of Guernsey, situated 6 
leagues (N. E.) from that island, and 7 miles (W.) from 
Cape La Hogue, in Normandy (from which it is sepa- 
rated by a strait, called by the French " Raz Blanchard," 
and by the English the Race of Alderney), and contain- 
ing 1030 inhabitants. This island, named in old En- 
glish records Aurney, Aureney, and Anrigny, by which 
last name it is still designated by the French geogra- 
phers, is supposed to have been the Riduna of Antoni- 
nus ; but little of its history is known prior to the time 
of Henry III., in the fourth year of whose reign an act 
of parliament was passed, by which it appears that one 
moiety of the island belonged to that monarch, and the 
other moiety to the Bishop of Coutances. From an 
extent of the crown, made in the fourth year of the 
reign of James I., the whole of the island was the pro- 
28 



perty of the king, who was entitled to the amends, or 
fines, and the perquisites of the court ; to the treiziemes, 
or thirteenths, upon the sale of lands ; and to the 
wrecks, and other princely rights and royalties ; but it 
was subsequently granted in fee-farm to successive 
tenants. George III., by letters patent under the great 
seal, bearing date Dec. 14th, 1763, in consideration of 
the surrender of the former lease, or patent, and for 
other considerations therein specified, granted the island 
to John Le Mesurier, Esq., for 99 years, with a 
proviso for resuming the lease at any time, upon pay- 
ment to the lessee of such amount of money as should 
have been disbursed in improving the mansion called 
the Governor's house, and the other premises ; and in 
this grant was included the_advowson of the church and 
chapel, with power to levy duties upon all vessels com- 
ing into the port of the island, in the same proportion 
as they are levied in the harbour of St. Peter's Port, in 
Guernsey. The rights and property of the island were, 
however, purchased by government from J. Le Mesu- 
rier, Esq., of Poole, who was the last governor. 

The approach to the ISLAND, particularly in stormy 
weather, is dangerous, from the rapidity and diversity 
of the currents, which at spring tides rush in contrary 
directions, with a velocity of six miles an hour, and 
from the numerous rocks by which it is surrounded. 
These rocks were fatal to Prince Henry, son of Henry I., 
who was wrecked here on his return from Normandy, 
in 1119; and, in 1744, to the Victory man of war, 
which was lost with the whole crew, consisting of 1100 
men : the French fleet, notwithstanding, escaped through 
this passage after its defeat at La Hogue, in 1692. 
About seven miles to the west are the Caskets, a cluster 
of rocks rising to a height of twenty-five to thirty 
fathoms from the water, and about one mile in circum- 
ference : on the south-west side is a naturally-formed 
harbour, in which a frigate may shelter as in a dock j 
steps are cut in the rock, and conveniences are provided 
for hauling up boats : there is also a smaller and less 
compact harbour on the north-east side. On these rocks 
three light-houses have been erected, and furnished with 
revolving reflectors. The island, which is four miles 
in length, one mile and a half in breadth, and nearly 
ten miles in circumference, shelves considerably to the 
north-east, and is intersected by deep valleys : the 
whole of the southern and eastern parts, from La Pen- 
dante to La Clanque, is bounded by cliffs varying in 
elevation from 100 to 200 feet, and presenting pic- 
turesque and striking scenery : the northern and eastern 
sides are terminated with lower cliffs, alternating with 
small bays and flat shores. The bay of Bray is remark- 
ably fine, affording good anchorage to vessels, and at 
low water the sands are very extensive : Longy bay is 
also commodious ; and Craby harbour, in which at 
spring tides the water rises to the height of twenty-fife 
feet, affords every facility for a wet dock. The east side 
of the island consists chiefly of reddish sandstone, and 
the west side 'principally of porphyry, neither of which 
rocks is found in large masses in any of the other 
islands of the group. About one-half of the land is in 
cultivation ; the remainder consists of common and 
furze land, affording good pasturage for sheep, but in- 
sufficient for cattle. The soil, though light and sandy, 
is in general good, and the system of agriculture similar 
to that of Guernsey ; but the general appearance of the 



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land is bare, as few trees and no thorn hedges are to be 
seen, the inclosures being formed by walls of loose 
stones, and furze banks. Of the Alderney breed of 
cows, which has taken its name from this island, Jersey 
and Guernsey furnish by far the greater number for ex- 
portation, this island but very few. The town is situated 
nearly in the centre of the island, and, with the excep- 
tion of the Governor's house, contains few buildings 
worthy of notice ; it is partially paved, and well sup- 
plied with water : there is a good road to Bray harbour, 
and another to Longy bay, where was an ancient nun- 
nery, subsequently used as barracks during the war, 
and, since the peace converted into an hospital, and a 
dep6t for military stores. The pier, near which are 
several houses, is of rude construction, with but one 
projecting arm, affording shelter to vessels only from 
the north-east. 

The CIVIL, JURISDICTION is exercised by a judge and six 
jurats, the former of whom is nominated by the gover- 
nor, and the latter elected by the commonalty ; they 
hold their several appointments for life, unless removed 
for misbehaviour, or malversation in office ; and, with 
the queen's officers, viz., the procureur, or attorney- 
general ; the comptroller, or solicitor- general ; and the 
greffier, or registrar, who is also nominated by the 
governor, compose the court, the decision of which, 
however, is not necessarily definitive, being subject to 
an appeal to the royal court at. Guernsey, and from that 
to the queen in council. In all criminal cases the court 
of Alderney has only the power of receiving evidence, 
which is transmitted to the superior court of Guernsey, 
where judgment is pronounced, and the sentence of the 
law executed. The entire jurisprudence of the island is 
similar to that of Guernsey, as appears by the order of 
the royal commissioners sent to the island by Queen 
Elizabeth, in 1585. The judge and six jurats, together 
with the douzainiers, being twelve men chosen by the 
commonalty for their representatives, compose the as- 
sembly of the states of the island, wherein all ordinances 
for its government are proposed. But the douzainiers 
have only a deliberative voice, and no vote, the judge 
and jurats alone deciding upon the expediency of any 
proposed measure. The governor, or his lieutenant, 
must be present at each assembly, but has no vote in it. 
The public acts were first registered at Alderney in 
1617, and the first contract was enrolled in the year 
1666. The privileges of the charter are inherited by 
birth, or obtained by servitude. 

It is not known at what time the CHURCH was built : 
it is an ancient edifice, not entitled to architectural 
notice; the tower was added to it in 1767, and a chapel 
near it was erected in 1763. From the year 1591 to 
1607 Alderney was without an officiating minister, 
during which period baptisms and marriages were solem- 
nized at Guernsey, and registered in the parish of St. 
Saviour. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 
A school for boys, and another for girls, were founded 
by J. Le Mesurier, Esq., the last governor ; the building 
was erected in 1790. The general hospital was erected 
in 1789, for the reception of patients, and is supported 
by subscription. The remains of the ancient nunnery 
have been converted into an hospital, substantially built 
pf sandstone, and surrounded by a strong wall; and 
there still exists part of a castle begun by the Earl of 
Essex, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, but never 
29 



finished, the ruinous foundations of which yet bear that 
favourite's name. The islet of Burhou, lying to the 
westward, is not inhabited, but is used by the governor 
as a rabbit-warren. 

ALDERSEY, a township, in the parish of CODDING- 
TON, union of GREAT BOUGHTON, Higher division of 
the hundred of BROXTON, S. division of the county of 
CHESTER, 8f miles (S. E. by S.) from Chester; contain- 
ing 138 inhabitants. Salt-works .were carried on here 
in the middle of the sixteenth century ; and there is still 
a brine spring in the neighbourhood, but it is not 
worked, owing to the distance from which coal must be 
brought for that purpose. 

ALDERSHOTT (Sr. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
hundred of CRONDALL, Odiham and N. divisions of 
the county of SOUTHAMPTON, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) 
from Farnham ; containing 685 inhabitants. It is situa- 
ted on the road between Farnham and Guildford, and 
comprises 4130 acres, of which 731 are arable, 550 
pasture, 130 woodland, 20 sites and gardens, 19 hops, 
and 2700 common. The Basingstoke canal passes within 
a mile and a half of the village. The living is a per- 
petual curacy; net income, 64; patrons, J. Eggar, 
S. Andrews, J. Alden, and W. Tice, Esqrs. ; impro- 
priators, Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. 
Cross, Winchester. The church contains a curious 
monument to the Titchbourne family, whose ancient seat 
has been converted into a farm-house. A school in union 
with the National Society has been established. There 
are some remains of an extensive Roman camp on 
Brixbury Hill. 

ALDERTON (ST. MARGARET), a parish, in the union 
of WINCHCOMB, Upper division of the hundred of 
TEWKESBURY, E. division of the county of GLOUCES- 
TER, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from AVinchcomb ; contain- 
ing, with the hamlet of Dixton, 411 inhabitants. It 
comprises by admeasurement 1750 acres ; the sur- 
rounding country is picturesque and beautiful, and 
extensive views are commanded from the neighbouring 
hills. Near Alderton Hill stood the fine old mansion, 
recently taken down, where one of the ancestors of the 
family of Tracy (Lord Sudely) was born ; and at Dixton 
is a large manor-house, where the Higfords, who have 
been great benefactors to the parish, resided for several 
centuries. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 22. 1. 10|. ; net income, 337; patron, Rev. 
C. Covey. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 150; the glebe consists of about 9 acres, 
and a commodious parsonage-house has recently been 
built. The church, which is an ancient structure, is 
distinguished for the elegance of its arches. A school is 
supported by subscription. At Dixton Hill are the 
remains of a Saxon encampment. Numerous fossils are 
found in the stone quarries in the parish. 

ALDERTON (ST. MARGARET), a parish, in the union 
of POTTERSPURY, hundred of CLELEY, S. division of 
the county of NORTHAMPTON, 3f miles (E. S. E.) from 
Towcester ; containing 166 inhabitants. On the north, 
the parish is bounded by the river Tow, and on the east 
partly by the road leading from Northampton to Stony- 
Stratford. It consists of 869. 20p. ; the surface is 
boldly undulated, and the village stands on the western 
declivity of an eminence. The living is a rectory, an- 
nexed to that of Grafton- Regis, and valued in the 
king's books at 12. 



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ALDERTON (ST. ANDREW); a parish, in the union 
of WOODBRIDGE, hundred of WILFORD, E. division of 
SUFFOLK, 7 miles (S. E. by S.) from Woodbridge ; com- 
prising 2635 acres by admeasurement, and containing 
620 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 14. 18. 4., and in the alternate patron- 
age of the lords of the four manors in the parish, of 
whom the Bishop of Norwich, as lord of Alderton Hall, 
is one. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 630, and there are about 22 acres of glebe. 

ALDERTON (ST. GILES), a parish, in the union of 
MALMESBURY, and forming a detached portion of the 
hundred of CHIPPENHAM, Malmesbury and Kingswood, 
and N. divisions of WILTS, 9 miles (N! W. by N.) from 
Chippenham ; containing 183 inhabitants. It comprises 
15S4 acres, of which a considerable portion is waste land. 
Stone is quarried suitable for building and the repair of 
roads. The living is a perpetual curacy, united with the 
rectory of Sherston-Parva, to the vicarage of Sherston- 
Magna, and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Glou- 
cester : the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 145, and the glebe consists of 47 acres, valued at 1 
per acre. The church is a very ancient structure. 

ALDERWASLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of 
WIRKSWORTH, union of HELPER, hundred of APPLETRKE, 
S. division of the county of DERBY, 2^ miles (E. by S.) 
from Wirksworth ; containing 398 inhabitants. There 
are iron-works and furnaces for smelting lead-ore in the 
neighbourhood. The chapel belongs to F. Hurst, Esq., 
who appoints the chaplain. 

ALDFIELD, a chapelry, in the parish of RIPON, 
Lower division of "the wapentake of CLARO, W. riding 
of YORK, 3^ miles (W. by S.) from Ripon ; containing 
132 inhabitants. This village, which is beautifully 
situated in the woody vale near Fountain's Abbey, is 
resorted to on account of its mineral springs, discovered 
about 1698, the sulphureous quality of which is said to 
be stronger than that of the Harrogate water. The sur- 
rounding scenery comprises all the variety and beauty of 
the picturesque spot of Matlock, in Derbyshire. The 
living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Mrs. 
Lawrence ; net income, 72. Rent-charges amounting 
to 59. 12. have been awarded as a commutation for the 
tithes, of which sum 38 are payable to the trustees of 
Smith's charity, and 21. 12. to the Dean and Chapter 
of Ripon. A school in connexion with the National 
Society has been established. 

ALDFORD (Sr. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in 
the union of GREAT BOUGHTON ; comprising the town- 
ships of Aldford and Churton in the Higher, and those 
of Buerton and Edgerley in the Lower, division of the 
hundred of BROXTON, S. division of the county of 
CHESTER ; and containing 835 inhabitants, of whom 
488 are in the township of Aldford, 5 miles (S. by E.) 
from Chester, on the road to Farndon -and Holt. This 
place, which had formerly a market and a fair, derives 
its name from an ancient ford on the river Dee, which 
divides it on the west from the county of Denbigh, 
North Wales, and over which a good bridge has been 
erected. In the reign of Henry II. a castle was built 
commanding the ford, of which, at present, only the 
earth-works, nearly adjoining the church, are remaining ; 
and in the reign of Charles I. a garrison was placed here 
by Sir William Brereton, during the siege of Chester. 
The parish contains, by measurement, 2633 acres ; there 
30 



are two quarries for red sandstone. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 16. 17. 85. , and 
in the gift of the Marquess of Westminster : the tithes 
of the township of Aldford have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 315, and the glebe comprises 21 acres, 
with a large and commodious house. The church stands 
on the verge of the castle moat, and has been repaired 
in various styles j in the churchyard is the recumbent 
effigy of a female, sculptured in red stone. Schools are 
supported ; and there are six almshouses for aged 
widows, endowed with 22 per annum. Vestiges of a 
Roman road, connecting the northern and southern 
branches of the Watling-street, are discernible in the 
parish. 

ALDHAM, a parish, in the union of LEXDEN and 
WINSTREE, Witham division of the hundred of LEX- 
DEN, N. division of ESSEX, 6 miles (E. N. E.) from Great 
Coggeshall ; containing 382 inhabitants. This place is 
situated on the river Colne, by which it is bounded on 
the north, and comprises an area of about four miles in 
circumference. Fairs are held at the hamlet of Ford- 
street on Easter-Tuesday and Nov. 1st. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 12 ; net income, 
327; patron, Bishop of London. The church is a rude 
edifice, with a small wooden turret, and consists of a 
nave, south aisle, and chancel. A national school is 
supported ; and 22 per annum, bequeathed by an un- 
known benefactor, are divided among 16 married per- 
sons who have not received parochial relief during the 
preceding twelve months. The Rev. Philip Morant, 
author of the History of Essex, was rector of the 
parish ; he died Nov. 26th, 1770, aged 70 years, and 
was interred in the chancel of the church, where a 
monument has been erected to his memory. The learned 
Sir John Marsham, one of the six clerks in chancery, 
and author of several valuable works, was proprietor of 
Bourchiers Hall (now a farm-house), in the reign of 
Charles I., to whose fortunes he was a firm adherent. 

ALDHAM (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of COSFORD, W. division of SUFFOLK, 2 miles 
(N. N. E.) from Hadleigh ; containing 293 inhabitants. 
It comprises 1742a. Ir. 33p., and has, for the most part, 
a hilly surface ; the land consists of arable, pasture, and 
wood, the last of which is tithe-free ; and the soil is 
stiff clay, and produces good corn. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 10. 13. 4.; net 
income, 290 ; patron, Thomas Barret Lennard, Esq. : 
the glebe consists of 45 acres. The church is situated 
on a hill, and is built of flint and stone, with a round 
tower : the advowson formerly belonged to the Earls of 
Oxford, whose arms are carved on the oak benches 
fitted up in the church in 1537. Dr. Rowland Taylor 
suffered martyrdom on the common of the parish, in 
1555. 

ALDINGBOURNE (ST. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of WEST HAMPNETT, hundred of Box and STOCK- 
BRIDGE, rape of CHICHESTER, W. division of SUSSEX, 
4^ miles (E. by N.) from Ch i Chester ; containing, with 
the hamlets of Lydsey and Westergate, 772 inhabitants. 
This was formerly the residence of the Bishops of Chi- 
chester, whose palace here was destroyed in the parlia- 
mentary war by Sir William Waller on his march to 
Arundel ; and a castellated building near the palace, 
situated on a mound surrounded with a moat, was de- 
molished at the same time. The road from Chichester 



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to Arundel, and the Portsmouth and Arun canal, both 
pass through the parish. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 5. 10. 5.; net income, 
212 5 patron and appropriator, the Dean of Chichester. 
The church is a cruciform structure in the Norman 
style, with a square embattled tower which terminates 
the north transept : the south transept is an ancient 
chapel, to which is an entrance by a fine Norman door- 
way. At Lydsey, a small hamlet in the parish, was a 
chapel founded prior to the year 1282, of which there 
are now no remains. A national school is supported. 

ALDINGHAM (Sr. CUTHBERT), a parish, in the 
union of ULVERSTONE, hundred of LONSDALE, north of 
the Sands, N. division of the county of LANCASTER, 5f 
miles (S.) from Ulverstone ; containing 907 inhabitants. 
It is situated on the western shore of Morcambe bay, 
which has encroached so much upon the lands, that the 
church, said to have been formerly in the centre of the 
parish, is now within the reach of a high tide. From a 
promontory on the coast, which was once surrounded 
by a moat, and is supposed to have been an exploratory 
station during the incursions of the Picts and Scots, 
there is an extensive prospect over the counties of West- 
morland and York. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 39. 19- 2., and in the patronage of 
the Crown ; net income, 1093. 

ALDINGTON (ST. MARTIN), a parish, in the union 
of EAST ASHFORD, partly in the libei'ty of ROMNEY- 
MARSH, but chiefly in the franchise and barony of 
BIRCHOLT, lathe of SHEPWAY, E. division of KENT, 5 
miles (W. by N.) from Hythe ; containing 733 inhabit- 
ants. It is crossed by the South-Eastern railway. The 
living is a rectory, with the chapel of Smeeth annexed, 
valued in the king's books at 38. 6. 8. ; net income, 
1014; patron, Archbishop of Canterbury. The church 
displays the early English style in its general structure ; 
the tower presents a specimen of very good masonry. 
A school for boys is supported by subscription. Eras- 
mus, the celebrated divine, was rector of the parish. 

ALDINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of BADSEY, 
union of EVESHAM, Upper division of the hundred of 
BLACKENHURST, Pershore and E. divisions of the county 
of WORCESTER, 2 miles (E.) from Evesham ; comprising 
628 acres, and containing 102 inhabitants. On the 
west it is bounded by the Avon and on the north by a 
stream which falls into that river. The soil is of the 
most fertile quality. 

ALDRIDGE (.ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
WALSALL, S. division of the hundred of OFFLOW and 
of the county of STAFFORD, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from 
Walsall ; containing, with the chapelry of Great Barr, 
2094 inhabitants, of whom 1007 are in the township of 
Aldridge. The neighbourhood affords a kind of clay, 
well adapted for the manufacture of the finest sort of 
pottery and tiles, which are made in great quantities. 
An extensive distillery is also carried on ; and the trade 
of the district is greatly facilitated by the Wyrley and 
Essington Extension canal, which passes within a quar- 
ter of a mile of the village. The living is a rectory, with 
the perpetual curacy of Great Barr annexed, valued in 
the king's books at 8. 1.3.; net income, 905 ; pa- 
tron, Sir E. D. Scott, Bart. The glebe comprises 30 
acres. The Wesleyans have a place of worship ; and 
there are two free schools ; one with an endowment of 
about 110 per annum, founded in 1718, by the Rev. 
31 



John Jordan, and the other endowed with 12 per an- 
num. The remains of a Roman encampment are visible 
in the parish. 

ALDRINGHAM (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of BLYTHING, E. division of SUF- 
FOLK, 2^ miles (N. by W.) from Aldborough ; contain- 
ing, with the hamlet of Thorpe, 401 inhabitants. The 
parish derives its name from the river Aide, (by some 
improperly called the Hundred brook,) which separates 
it from Aldborough : it comprises 860 acres. A market 
was formerly held, which has fallen into disuse : there 
is a small fair on St. Andrew's day, called Cold Fair. 
The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 59 : 
patron and impropriator. Lord Huntingfield, whose 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 205. 
There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists. 

ALDRINGTON, EAST, a parish, in the union of 
STEYNING, hundred of FISHERGATE, rape of LEWES, E. 
division of SUSSEX, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Brighton ; 
containing about 650 acres. This place is by Carnden, 
Stillingfleet, and others, identified with the Portus Adriani 
of the Romans ; and urns, skeletons, pottery, and other 
relics of Roman antiquity have been frequently disco- 
vered in this and the adjoining parishes, which appear 
to have been the first points of attack when the Saxons 
began to infest the coasts. It is bounded on the south 
by the English Channel, which has made such encroach- 
ments on the land as to have completely destroyed the 
village, and the parish is now without any population, 
except one individual returned in the last census. The 
road and railway from Brighton to Shoreham both pass 
through it. The living is a discharged rectory, valued 
in the king's books at ?. 10. 2. ; net income, 294 ; 
patrons, the Masters and Fellows of Magdalene College, 
Cambridge. The church is in ruins. 

ALDSTONE. See ALSTON. 

ALDSWORTH (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union 
of NORTHLEACH, hundred of BRIGHTWELL'S BARROW, 
E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 3^ miles (S. 
E.) from Northleach ; containing 365 inhabitants. The 
living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of 
Turkdean; net income, 66. The tithes were com- 
muted for land and an annual money payment, by an 
inclosure act, in 1793. The peculiar of Aldsworth is re- 
gularly inhibited during the bishop's visitation, although 
his right has been and still continues to be resisted by 
the patron and ordinary of the peculiar, notwithstanding 
an award of the Dean of Arches, in 1741, in the bishop's 
favour. 

ALDSWORTH, a tything, in the parish and union 
of WEST* BOURNE, hundred of WEST BOURNE and SIN- 
GLETON, rape of CHICHESTER, W. Division of SUSSEX ; 
containing 118 inhabitants. 

ALDWARK, a township, in the parish of ALNE, 
union of EASINGWOULD, wapentake of BULMER, N. 
riding of YORK, 6 miles (E. S. E.) from Boroughbridge ; 
containing 224 inhabitants. This place comprises about 
2220 acres, and was anciently a possession of a branch 
of the Fitzwilliam family : the village is seated in the 
vale of the Ouse, and nearly a mile to the south is Ald- 
wark bridge, a substantial wooden structure, which 
crosses the river and its banks by twenty-seven arches 
and culverts. The vicarial tithes have been commuted 
for a rent- charge of 75, and the impropriate tithes 
for 3. 11. 



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ALDWARK, a township, in the parish of ECCLES- 
FIELD, union of WORTLEY, N. division of the wapen- 
take of STRAFFORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of 
YORK, 2^ miles (N. E.) from Rotherham. Aldwark, or 
" the old work," the seat of the Clarelles, Fitzwilliams, 
and Foljambes, lies remote from the rest of the parish, 
and has consequently never been considered a part of 
Hallamshire : its long line of resident proprietors pre- 
sents a fine subject for the genealogist and antiquary. 
About eleven years since the extensive corn and oil 
mills on the opposite side of the river Don, were burnt 
down. 

ALDWARK, a township, in the parish of BRAD- 
BORNE, union of BAKEWELL, hundred of WIRKSWORTH, 
S. division of the county of DERBY, 5f miles (N. W. by 
W.) from Wirksworth ; containing 82 inhabitants. 

ALDWICK, a tything, in the parish of PAGHAM, 
union of WEST HAMPNETT, hundred of ALDWICK, rape 
of CHICHESTER, W. division of SUSSEX ; containing 203 
inhabitants. 

ALDWINKLE (ALL SAINTS}, a parish, in the union 
of THRAPSTON, hundred of HXJXLOE, N. division of the 
county of NORTHAMPTON, 4 miles (N.) from Thrapston ; 
containing 272 inhabitants. It is situated on the navi- 
gable river Nene, and contains about 1000 acres. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
12, 4. 2. 5 net income, 311 ; patron, Rev. R. Ro- 
berts, D.D. The tithes were commuted for land and 
a money- payment, by an inclosure act, in 1792 ; the 
gleoe comprises 205 acres. The church is remarkable 
for its beautiful tower : it has some windows in the de- 
corated English style, and a small ornamented chapel 
adjoining the southern side of the chancel. A school, 
with a small endowment, is further supported by sub- 
scription ; and the sum of 30 per annum, the rental 
of a plantation of twelve acres, is divided between the 
poor of the two parishes of Aldwinkle, All Saints, and 
St. Peter. There is a chalybeate spring. The poet 
Dryden was born in the parsonage-house, in 1631. 

ALDWINKLE (Sr. PETER), a parish, in the union 
of THRAPSTON, hundred of HUXLOE, N. division of the 
county of NORTHAMPTON, 3|- miles (N. by E.) from 
Thrapston ; containing 183 inhabitants. The river 
Nene, which is navigable to the North Sea, and com- 
municates with the Northampton canal, flows through 
the parish. Here are the remains of a singular cruci- 
form building, called Liveden, erected by the Tresham 
family, and richly decorated with sculpture, especially 
round the cornice, which exhibits a Roman Catholic 
legend and a variety of religious symbols. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 11. 6. 3.; 
net income, 230 ; patron, Lord Lilford : the glebe 
consists of 183 acres. There is a place of worship for 
Particular Baptists. Dr. Thomas Fuller, author of 
" The History of the Worthies of England," and other 
learned works, was born in the parish. 

ALD WORTH (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
WANTAGE, hundred of COMPTON, county of BERKS, 4 
miles (E. by S.) from East Ilsleyj containing 314 in- 
habitants. This place, supposed by Hearne to have 
been a Roman station, comprises 1785a. 3r. 32p., of 
which nearly the whole is cultivated land ; the village 
is situated on an eminence commanding extensive and 
interesting views. The living is a vicarage, valued in 
the king's books at 8. 16. 0^. ; patrons and appro- 
32 



priators, Master and Fellows of St. John's College, 
Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for 
a rent-charge of 400, and the vicarial for 100 5 the 
appropriate glebe consists of 27, and the vicarial of 16, 
acres. The church is an ancient structure of simple 
character, containing eight altar-tombs, on which are 
nine recumbent figures, under highly enriched arches, 
elegantly sculptured, supposed to represent different 
members of the De la Beche family, and to have been 
executed in the fourteenth century. A school is sup- 
ported by subscription. 

ALEMOUTH. See ALNMOUTH. 

ALETHORPE, an extra-parochial liberty, locally 
in the parish of FAKENHAM, union of WALSINGHAM, 
hundred of GALLOW, W. division of NORFOLK, 2 miles 
(N. E. by E.) from Fakenham ; containing 8 inhabit- 
ants. 

ALEXTON (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
BILLESDON, hundred of EAST GOSCOTE, N. division of 
the county of LEICESTER, 3| miles (W. by N.) from 
Uppingham ; containing 81 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is separated from Rutland by the river Eye, and 
is situated near the road from Leicester to Cambridge, 
comprises 997 a. 28/>., nearly the whole good grazing 
land ; and all, with the exception of 200 acres, tithe-free : 
the soil is a stiff clay, and the surface is undulated and 
pleasingly wooded. The ancient hall, built in the reign of 
Elizabeth, is adorned with avenues of Scotch and Balm 
of Gilead firs, which are considered the finest in the 
country. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 6. 18. 4.; net income, 140; patron, Lord 
Berners. Attached are 24 acres of glebe within the 
parish, and two in Belton Field. The church was built 
in 15Q4, by Edward Andrewes, Esq. 

ALFOLD (ST. NICHOLAS), & parish, in the union of 
HAMBLEDON, First division of the hundred of BLACK- 
HEATH, W. division of SURREY, 8| miles (S. E. by S.) 
from Godalming ; containing 519 inhabitants. The 
parish comprises 2726et. Ir. 33p., and abounds with 
oak, ash, and elm : in parts there is a bed of stone, 
which is used for repairing the roads, but is not hard 
enough for building. The Arun and Wey Junction canal 
passes through it. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 6. 11. 2., and in the gift of the 
Rev. L. W. Eliot : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent- charge of 355, and the glebe comprises 14 acres. 
The church consists of a nave, chancel, and south aisle, 
with a tower surmounted by a small spire : the parson- 
age-house is situated on the south side of the church- 
yard. Schools are supported by subscription. 

ALFORD (ST. WILFRED), a market-town and 
parish, in the union of SPILSBY, Wold division of the 
hundred of CALCEWORTH, parts of LINDSEY, county of 
LINCOLN, 34 miles (E.) from Lincoln, and 137 (N. by 
E.) from London; containing 1945 inhabitants. This 
place, which derives its name from an old ford 
over a stream that twice runs through it, is a small, 
though ancient, town, and is described by Leland 
as consisting of one street of mean buildings, cover- 
ed with thatch. Since that writer's time, however, 
it has been considerably improved, particularly during 
the last 20 years : it is pleasantly situated, and is one 
of the polling-stations for the parts of Lindsey. The 
market is held on Tuesday, and fairs' occur on Whit- 
Tuesday and the 8th of November : a court leet takes 



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place annually, and petty-sessions once in every three 
weeks ; and under an act passed in the 47th of George 
III., a court of requests, for sums not exceeding 5, is 
held monthly, the jurisdiction of which also extends 
over several other towns in the county. The parish 
comprises about 1000 acres of land. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, with Rigsby annexed, valued in 
the king's books at 10, and in the patronage of the 
Bishop of Lincoln, the appropriator, with a net income 
of 122 : the church is a large structure of stone, re- 
paired with brick, embellished by a tower commanding 
very extensive views of the adjacent districts, and con- 
taining many ancient monuments. There are places of 
worship for Primitive Methodists, Baptists, Indepen- 
dents, and Wesleyans. 

The free grammar school was founded and endowed 
by Mr. Francis Spanning, in 1565 ; and its revenue 
has been considerably augmented by subsequent bene- , 
factions of lands at Farlesthorpe, Thoresthorpe, Wood- 
thorpe, Strubby, and Cumberworth, containing in the 
whole 260 acres, and yielding an annual rent of 
268. 18., together with the living of Saleby, the pa- 
tronage being vested in the governors. By a charter 
obtained in 15J6, it was made a royal foundation, to be 
called " The Free Grammar School of Queen Elizabeth," 
and the management vested in eleven governors, who 
are a body corporate, and have a common seal. It has 
two quinquennial fellowships at Magdalene College, 
Cambridge ; and there is a scholarship of 6. 8. 6. per 
annum at Jesus' College, Cambridge, for students from 
Alford, Caistor, or Louth schools ; and children of 
parents residing in the parishes of Thoresthorpe, Well 
with Mawthorpe, Ailby, Rigsby, Bilsby, and also Farles- 
thorpe, and Saleby, are eligible for admission to the 
school. The premises consist of a substantial brick 
house for the master, with two commodious rooms 
adjoining, and a large garden in the town. A national 
school, in which 130 children of both sexes are in- 
structed, was founded by Mr. John Spendluffe, who 
endowed it with an estate now producing 70 per 
annum. Almshouses for six poor people were erected 
and endowed by Sir Robert Christopher, Knt., in 1668; 
the endowment was subsequently augmented by Lord 
Harborough, in 1716. Richard Towthby gave some 
land, now yielding 12 per annum, for a school, or to 
the poor : and there are several other bequests for dis- 
tribution among the necessitous. In the vieinity are 
the ruins of Hornby or Hagnaby abbey, which appears 
to have occupied a site of eight or nine acres. A salt 
spring, efficacious in scurvy, jaundice, &c., was dis- 
covered here in 1670. Alford confers the title of Vis- 
count on the family of Brownlow. 

ALFORD (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
WINCANTON, hundred of CATSASH, E. division of SO- 
MERSET, if mile (W. by N.) from Castle-Cary; con- 
taining 90 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, consoli- 
dated with that of Hornblotton by act of parliament in 
1836, and valued in the king's books at Q. 9. 9. ; 
patron and incumbent, Rev. J. G. D. Thring. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 140, and 
there are 40 acres of glebe. At a farm-house, called 
Alford Well, about three-quarters of a mile from the 
church, is a saline chalybeate spring, now disused. 

ALFRETON (ST. MARY), a market-town and 
parish, in the union of BELPER, hundred of SCARSDAL.E, 
VOL. L 33 



N. division of the county of DERBY, 14 miles (N. N. E.) 
from Derby, and 140 (N. N. W.) from London ; com- 
prising the township of Alfreton, the ville of Greenhill- 
Lane, the manor of Riddings with Nonville, and the 
hamlets of Summercotes and Swanwick ; and con- 
taining 7577 inhabitants, of whom 1774 are in Alfreton 
township. This place, called in King Ethelred's char- 
ter to Burton abbey, " Alfredingtune," is supposed to 
have derived its name from Alfred the Great, who is 
thought to have been its founder. The town is situated 
on the brow of a hill, and consists of three or four 
streets, with a market-place in the centre; the houses 
are irregularly built, and some of them are fine speci- 
mens of the ancient style of architecture. The manu- 
facture of stockings is carried on to a considerable 
extent; and there are large coal and iron works at 
Alfreton Riddings, Butterley, and Codnor Park, the 
produce of which is conveyed by the Erewash canal, 
which passes about six miles off. The market is on 
Friday ; and fairs are held on Jan. 26th, Easter- Mon- 
day, Whit-Tuesday, July 31st, Oct. 7th, and Nov. 24th. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 7. 18. 9.; net income, 150; patron and 
impropriator, W. Palmer Morewood, Esq. The church 
is an ancient structure, in the early and later English 
styles, with an embattled tower crowned by pinnacles. 
A district church has been built at Riddings, in the 
parish, by subscription, aided by a grant from the Par- 
liamentary Commissioners ; there is a place of worship 
for Wesleyans. A free school was founded in 1740, by 
Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, who endowed it with 48^ acres 
of land at Swanwick, in the parish, for the instruction of 
twelve boys and eight girls, of Swanwick and Greenhill- 
Lane. 

ALFRICK, a chapelry, in the parish of SUCKLEY, 
union of MARTLEY, Upper division of the hundred of 
DODDINGTREE, Worcester and W. divisions of the 
county of WORCESTER, 7 miles (W. by S.) from Worces- 
ter ; containing 434 inhabitants. It is bounded on the 
north by the river Teme, and consists of 1645 acres ; 
the surface is undulated, and very well wooded and 
watered. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 240 ; and there is a glebe of 2^ acres, with 
a property in the chapel yard. The chapel is dedicated 
to St. Mary. There is a free school with an endow- 
ment of 10 per annum. 

ALFRISTON (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of EASTBOURNE, hundred of ALCESTON, rape of PE- 
VENSEY, E. division of SUSSEX, 9 miles (S. E.) from 
Lewes ; containing 668 inhabitants. It is bounded on 
the east by the Cuchmere river ; the soil is rich and 
fertile, and the produce of the orchards and gardens is 
remarkable for quality and exuberance. The village, 
beautifully situated in a valley near the river, was for- 
merly of much greater extent than at present, and in 
the centre is an ancient cross, where probably a market 
was held. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 11. 16. 0^., and in the patron- 
age of the Crown ; net income, 135 ; impropriators, 
the Trustees of " Smith's Charity." The church is an 
ancient cruciform structure, in the decorated and later 
English styles, with a central tower surmounted by a 
spire. There is a place of worship for Independents ; 
and a national school is supported by subscription. On 
the neighbouring downs are several barrows, in some of 

F 






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which urns, spear-heads, and other relics of antiquity 
have been found. 

ALGARKIRK (ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a parish, 
in the union of BOSTON, wapentake of KIRTON, parts of 
HOLLAND, county of LINCOLN, 6 miles (S.) from Boston ; 
containing 754 inhabitants. This place derives its 
name from the Saxon Earl Algar, who, in 870, aided by 
his seneschals Wibert and Leofric, obtained a victory 
over the Danes in this neighbourhood, but was defeated 
and slain on the day following : a statue of stone in 
the churchyard is said to have been erected to his 
memory. The parish comprises by admeasurement 
5041 acres. The living is a rectory, with Fosdyke an- 
nexed, valued in the king's books at 50. 18. l. ; pa- 
tron and incumbent, Rev. Basil Beridge. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 990, and the 
glebe, including that of Fosdyke, comprises 500 acres. 
The church, which is partly in the Norman and partly 
in the early English style, is rich in its details, and 
contains monuments to the Beridge family since the 
time of James I. The parsonage-house has a very 
picturesque appearance. About 38 per annum, the 
amount of various bequests, is distributed among the 
poor, who are also eligible to the benefit of Sir Thomas 
Middlecott's Hospital at Fosdyke. 

ALHAMPTON, a tything, in the parish of DITCH EAT, 
hundred of WHITSTONE, E. division of SOMERSET, 2f 
miles (N. W. by N.) from Castle-Cary ; containing 386 
inhabitants. There was formerly a chapel at this place. 

ALKERTON, a tything, in the parish of EASTING- 
TON, union of WHEATENHURST, Lower division of the 
hundred of WHITSTONE, E. division of the county of 
GLOUCESTER, 3 miles (W.) from Stroud; containing 
1108 inhabitants. 

ALKERTON (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of BANBURY, hundred of BLOXHAM, county of OXFORD, 
6 miles (W. N. W.) from Banbury ; comprising 691. 
24/>., and containing 190 inhabitants. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 6. 3. 9. ; net in- 
come, 153 ; patron, J. Dent, Esq. The tithes were 
commuted for land and a money payment, by an inclo- 
sure act, in 1776. The church has some sculpture in 
the mouldings of the outer walls, representing angels 
scattering incense. Thomas Lydiat, the learned mathe- 
matician and chronologer, was born at Alkerton in the 
year 1572. 

ALKHAM (ST. ANTHONY), a parish, in the union of 
DOVOR, hundred of FOLKESTONE, lathe of SHEPWAY, 
E. division of KKNT, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Dovor j 
containing 595 inhabitants. It comprises 3145a. 2r. 
28p., including 300 acres of woodland, and 100 of com- 
mon ; the surface is hilly, and the soil chalky, except 
at the tops of the hills, where it is a stiff clay. The 
living is a vicarage, with Capel-le-Ferne annexed, valued 
in the king's bt>oks at 11 ; net income, 152 ; patron 
and appropriator, Archbishop of Canterbury, whose 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 500, 
and the vicarial tithes for 213. 10. : there are 9^ acres 
of appropriate glebe, and about 3 of vicarial. The 
church is partly Norman, and partly early English : 
the interior, which has been much improved of late 
years, has a venerable and interesting aspect, and there 
are some ancient monumental stones. According to 
Domesday book, a church existed here in the time of 
Edward the Confessor. 
34 



ALKINGTON, a tything, in the parish, and Upper 
division of the hundred of BERKELEY, union of THORN- 
BURY, W. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 1^ 
mile (S. E.) from Berkeley ; containing 1 175 inhabit- 
ants. The village of Newport, on the great road from 
Gloucester to Bristol, is situated in this tything, and is 
the central posting- place between those cities ; it con- 
tains two good hotels and several smaller inns. There is 
a place of worship for Independents. 

ALKINGTON, a township, in the parish of WHIT- 
CHURCH, Whitchurch division of the hundred of NORTH 
BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP, 2 miles (S. by W.) 
from Whitchurch. 

ALKMONTON, a township, in the parish of LONG- 
FORD, hundred of APPLETREE, S. division of the county 
of DERBY, 5f miles (S. by E.) from Ashbourn ; con- 
taining 102 inhabitants. There was anciently an 
hospital dedicated to St. Leonard, between this place 
and Hungry-Bentley, in the same parish, to which 
Walter Blount, Lord Mountjoy, was a benefactor, in 
1474. The tithes have been commuted for rent-charges 
amounting to 54. 15., of which 28. 15. are payable 
to the rector, and 26 to the vicar, of Longford. 

ALKRINGTON, a township, in the parish of OLD- 
HAM-CUM-PRESTWICH, union of OLDHAM, hundred of 
SALFORD, S. division of the county of LANCASTER, 4 
miles (N. N. E.) from Manchester ; containing 338 in- 
habitants. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 40. 

ALLCANNINGS (.Sr. ANNE}, a parish, in the union 
of DEVIZES, hundred of SWANBOROUGH, Devizes and N. 
divisions of WILTS, 5f miles (E.) from Devizes j com- 
prising the chapelry of Etchilhampton and the ty things 
of Allington and Fullaway, and containing 851 inhabit- 
ants. On the downs is St. Anne's hill, on which a 
large fair for sheep and horses is held on the 6th of 
August. The Kennet and Avon canal affords facility 
for the conveyance of goods. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 31. 16. 10^., and in the 
gift of Lord Ashburton : the tithes, including those of 
Etchilhampton, have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
1204. 5., and the glebe comprises 36 acres. The 
church is an ancient structure in the Norman style. 
There is a chapel of ease at Etchilhampton ; and a 
national school is supported by subscription. Miss 
Anne Lavington, in 1828, bequeathed 500, the interest 
to be distributed among the poor at Christmas. 

ALLEN, ST. (Sx. ALLEYN), a parish, in the union 
of TRURO, W. division of the hundred of POWDER and 
of CORNWALL, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Truro ; contain- 
ing 652 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 8. 13. 4.; patron, Bishop of 
Exeter : impropriator, Earl of Falmouth. The great 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 265, 
and the vicarial for 147 5 and there are 95 acres of 
glebe. The parish contains a Danish encampment. 

ALLENDALE, a market-town and parish, in the 
union of HEXHAM, S. division of TINDALE ward and of 
NORTHUMBERLAND, 7 niiles (S.) from Haydon Bridge, 
9f miles (S. W. by W.) from Hexham, and 286 (N. N. W.) 
from London ; comprising the grieveships of Allendale 
town, Broadside, Catton, High and Low Forest, Keenly, 
Park, and West Allen High and Low ; and containing 
5729 inhabitants. The town, which includes 1217 per- 
sons, is irregularly built on an acclivity gradually rising 



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from the eastern bank of the river Allen, over which a 
bridge was erected in 1825. The market is on Friday ; 
the fairs are held on the Friday before the llth of May, 
the 22nd of August, and the first Friday after the fes- 
tival of St. Luke, for horses, cattle, and sheep ; and a 
cattle show, which has been established within the last 
few years, is annually held. In the market-place are 
the ruins of a cross. This very extensive parish derives 
its name from the river Allen, a small but rapid stream 
which rises in the hamlet of Allenheads, in East Allen, 
and Coalcleugh, in West Allen, and falls into the river 
Tyne about three miles to the west of Haydon Bridge, 
where is a station of the Newcastle and Carlisle railway. 
The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the lead-mines, 
which are on a large scale, producing upwards of 3500 
tons of lead annually ; there are several works for grind- 
ing and washing the ore, and two extensive smelting- 
houses, one having an horizontal chimney 2^ miles long, 
with a terminus upwards of 780 feet above the ground 
floor of the mill, and the other a chimney 1^ mile in 
length, and 700 feet above the ground floor ; in one of 
these smelting-houses twenty-one tons pass through the 
furnace weekly, from which a considerable quantity of 
silver is separated. Limestone is extensively quarried, 
and there are also numerous quarries of stone of good 
quality for building. 

The LIVING is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 130; 
patron, T. W.Beaumont, Esq.; impropriators, T.W.Beau- 
mont, Esq., and others. The church is of stone, rebuilt 
in 1807- Within the parish also are four chapels, in 
the gift of the incumbent of Allendale, viz. St. Peter's, 
rebuilt in 1825, a perpetual curacy, of which the net in- 
come is 74 ; the chapel at Nine-Banks, partially rebuilt 
about 1816, a perpetual curacy, with an income of 124 ; 
the chapel at the Carr Shield, or West Allen High 
chapel, built in 1822, also a perpetual curacy, of which 
the income is 109 ; and that of Allenheads, described 
under its proper head. There are places of worship for 
the Society of Friends and Wesleyans. A free school 
for the children of parishioners is endowed with two 
tenements, bequeathed by William Hutchinsou in 1692, 
producing a rental of 24 ; and with other premises and 
thirty-two acres of land, in Broadside, purchased with a 
legacy of Christopher Wilkinson in 1700, and yielding 
38 per annum. There are also various other schools, 
connected with the different places of worship in the 
parish ; and the curates of W T est Allen High and Allen- 
heads chapels are obliged to teach the miners' children 
for Is. 6d. per quarter each, in consideration of certain 
annual payments of 5s. from each miner of one descrip- 
tion, and 2s. 6rf. from those of another, which they re- 
ceive as ministers of the respective chapels. Various 
small sums, the principal of which is an annuity of 10 
from Shield's charity, are distributed annually among 
the poor. There are several chalybeate springs in the 
parish, and at a place called Old Town, about three 
miles to the north-west, are vestiges of an ancient 
intrench ment, of a square form, supposed to be Ro- 
man. 

ALLENHEADS, a hamlet (formerly a distinct pa- 
rish), in the parish of ALLENDALE, S. division of TIN- 
DALE ward and of NORTHUMBERLAND, 17 miles 
(S. S. W.) from Hexham : the population is returned 
with that of Allendale. The living is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 4. 8. 1^. ; present net in- 
35 



come, 50; patron, incumbent of Allendale; impro- 
priators, T. W. Beaumont, Esq., and others. The chapel 
was rebuilt by Col. Beaumont, in 1826, on the site of 
one erected in 1701 by Sir William Blackett, for the 
religious duties of the miners, who at that time attended 
prayers every morning at six o'clock : it is now con- 
sidered a domestic chapel, and near it is a good house 
for the minister, occupied by the incumbent of St. 
Peter's, described in the preceding article, who officiates 
in both chapels. There are several veins of lead-ore in 
the neighbourhood, which are worked to a considerable 
extent. 

ALLENSFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of SHOT- 
LEY, union of HEXHAM, E. division of TINDALE ward, 
S. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 13 miles (S. E.) from 
Hexham. This place is on the north side of the river 
Derwent, over which is a stone bridge. 

ALLENSMORE (Sr. ANDREW), a parish, in the 
hundred of WEBTREE, union and county of HEREFORD, 
4 miles (S. W.) from Hereford ; containing 668 inhabit- 
ants. The parish is intersected by the road from Here- 
ford to Monmouth, and consists of 1820 acres, the sur- 
face being generally level, with an ample proportion of 
timber. The living is a discharged vicarage, rated in 
the king's books at 5. 12. 6., and endowed with 400 
royal bounty ; patron, the Dean of Hereford. The ap- 
propriate tithes have been commuted for two rent- 
charges, each of 125, one payable to the Dean, and the 
other to the Dean and Chapter of Hereford ; the vicarial 
tithes have been commuted for 175, and a rent charge 
of 7. 6. is paid to impropriators. There are 30 acres 
of glebe. A school was established in 1824. 

ALLENTON, or ALLWINTON (&T. MICHAEL), a 
parish, in the union of ROTHBURY, W. division of 
COQ.UETDALE ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND ; 
comprising the townships of Allenton, Biddleston, Bor- 
rowdon, Clennell, Fairhaugh, Farnham, Linbriggs, Ne- 
therton, North and South sides, Peals, and Sharperton ; 
and containing 1255 inhabitants, of whom 78 are in the 
township of Allenton, 19 miles (W. by S.) from Alnwick. 
The parish is of great extent, stretching from the parish 
of Rothbury to Scotland, and 20 miles from east to 
west ; and consists almost entirely of porphyritic moun- 
tains, presenting very abrupt elevations, covered with 
short thick grass, valuable for rearing sheep. The 
river Coquet rises within its limits, and here pursues a 
winding course through a very narrow valley, the moun- 
tains rising in many parts almost perpendicularly from 
its bed : it is joined by the Alwine, which gives name to 
the parish. Two fairs are held at Hatbottle, in Hally- 
stone, chiefly for wool and sheep, in July and September. 
The living is a vicarage not in charge, with the curacy 
of Hallystone annexed; net income, 130, with a glebe- 
house recently built ; patron, Duke of Northumberland ; 
impropriators, Thomas Clennell, Esq., and otheis. The 
church is an ancient edifice, but has been greatly dis- 
figured by repairs. At Harbottle is a Presbyterian 
meeting-house ; also a national school for the instruc- 
tion of the poor, which is endowed with 18 per 
annum, arising from the produce of the sale of a mes- 
suage in Newcastle, amounting to 400, bequeathed by 
William Dixon in 1806. Here was formerly an hospital 
belonging to the convent at Hallystone ; and on the 
south side of the Coquet, are vestiges of an old structure, 
called Barrow Peel, to the west of which is Ridlee Cairn 

F2 



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Hill, supposed to have been burial-places of the ancient 
Britons. Throughout the district are numerous other 
remains of the Britons, consisting of encampments, 
cromlechs, &c., and at Chew green, near the Scottish 
border, are the remains of a very extensive Roman 
station, the next to the north from Bremenium, High 
Rochester. 

ALLER, a hamlet, in the parish of HILTON, union 
of BLANDFORD, hundred of WHITEWAY, Blandford divi- 
sion of DORSET ; containing 91 inhabitants. 

ALLER (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union of 
LANGFORD, hundred of SOMERTON, W. division of 
SOMERSET, 6% miles (W.) from Somerton ; containing 
559 inhabitants. Guthrum, the Danish chief, received 
baptism at this place, under the sponsorship of Alfred 
the Great, after the victory obtained by that monarch 
over the Danes at Ethandune. Aller Moor was the scene 
of a battle between the royalists and the parliamentarians 
in 1644. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 36. 15., and in the gift of Emanuel College, 
Cambridge : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 590, and the glebe comprises 66 acres. A 
national school has been built. Dr. Ralph Cudworth, 
author of " The Intellectual System of the Universe," 
was born here in 1617- 

ALLERBY, or ALWARDBY, with OUGHTERSIDE, a 
township, in the parish of ASPATRIA, union of COCKER- 
MOUTH, ALLERDALE ward below Derwent, and county 
of CUMBERLAND, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from Cockermouth ; 
containing 555 inhabitants. 

ALLERFORD, a tything, in the parish of SEL- 
WORTHY, union of WILLITON, hundred of CARHAMPTON, 
W. division of SOMERSET; containing 181 inhabitants. 

ALLERSTON (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
and lythe of PICKERING, N. riding of the county of 
YORK, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Pickering ; containing 
414 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measure- 
ment 9110 acres, of which about 4800 are arable and 
pasture, 240 wood and plantations, and the remainder 
large tracts of moor abounding with peat and turf: the 
surface is varied, and in some parts mountainous, and 
the lands on the south side, which are low, are fre- 
quently overflowed by the Derwent. Coal is supposed 
to exist, but has not been wrought. The village is 
situated at the foot of the moors of Pickering forest, and 
on the northern verge of the fertile marshes of the vale 
of Derwent. The living has been united to the vicarage 
of Ebberston since 124*2 : the church is an ancient edi- 
fice, with a lofty square tower. A national school was 
erected in 1839, under the auspices of the vicar, and is 
supported by subscription, aided by a donation of 14 
per annum from George Osbaldiston, Esq., the lord of 
the manor. 

ALLERTHORPE, a parish, in the union of POCK- 
UNGTON, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of 
HARTHILL, E. riding of YORK ; containing, with the 
townships of Allerthorpe and Waplington, 1 99 inhabit- 
ants, of whom 154 are in the township of Allerthorpe, 
l mile (S. W, by W.) from Pocklington. The general 
surface of the parish is flat and well wooded, and it con- 
sists of 1543a. Ir. 33p., of which about 670 acres are 
arable, 420 meadow or pasture, and 450 common land, 
tithe-free ; the soil is of a light and various quality, but 
chiefly sandy. On the east the parish is bounded by 
the Pocklington canal, and it is also contiguous to the 
30 



road between York and Market- Weighton. The living 
is annexed to the vicarage of Thornton : the appro- 
priate tithes have been commuted for a rent- charge of 
246. 2. 6., and the vicarial for one of 73. 12.; and 
there are a glebe-house and 3 acres of glebe. In the 
church is a very fine font. A school is endowed with 
9 per annum, the interest of 200 bequeathed by Mr. 
John Hart. 

ALLERTHORPE, with SWAINBY, a township, in 
the parish of PICKHILL, union of BEDALE, wapentake of 
HALLIKELD, N. riding of YORK, 5 miles (E. S. E.) from 
Bedale; containing 31 inhabitants. Helewise, daughter 
of Ranulph de Glanville, founded a priory here for 
canons of the Pramonstratensian order, which was 
removed to Coverham in 1215. Allerthorpe Hall was 
for some time the residence of Mrs. Elizabeth Montague. 

ALLERTON, a township, in the parish of CHILD- 
WALL, union and hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division 
of the county of LANCASTER, 5^ miles (S. E.) from 
Liverpool ; containing 443 inhabitants. The appro- 
priate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
228. 3. 8., payable to the Bishop of Chester, and the 
vicarial for one of 42. 17- 6. Adjoining the farm on 
which stands the famous Allerton oak, is a supposed 
Druidical monument, called Calder Stones, in digging 
around which, more than sixty years since, urns of the 
coarsest clay, containing human bones, were found. 

ALLERTON, a township, and, with WILSDEN, an 
ecclesiastical district, in the parish and union of BRAD- 
FORD, wapentake of MORLEY, W. riding of YORK, 4 
miles (W. N.W.) from Bradford ; containing 1914 inhabit- 
ants. This township, which is part of the ancient manor 
of Allerton-cum-Wilsden, comprises by measurement 
1872 acres, of which a very considerable portion of 
waste has, under the provisions of an act of parliament, 
obtained in 1840, by Mrs. Ferrand, the lady of the 
manor, in concurrence with the principal freeholders, 
been inclosed, and is rapidly coming into profitable cul- 
tivation. Of the land, about 1100 acres are meadow and 
pasture, 550 arable, and 40 wood and plantations ; the 
soil is not unfertile, and the substratum is chiefly coal 
and freestone of good quality ; the surface is varied, and 
the scenery in many parts pleasingly picturesque. There 
are several ancient mansions, formerly the seats of dis- 
tinguished families, of which Crossley, Shuttleworth, and 
Allerton halls, are still remaining ; and Dean House, the 
asylum of the celebrated Oliver Heywood, during the 
times of the Tudors and Stuarts, is now divided into 
several tenements. The township consists chiefly of 
scattered houses, and the inhabitants are principally 
employed in the worsted manufacture, and in the coal- 
mines and quarries. The church was erected in 1823 ; 
and there are places of worship for General Baptists, 
Independents, and Wesleyans. 

ALLERTON-BYWATER, a township, in the parish 
of KIPPAX, Lower division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, 
W. riding of YORK, 4f miles (N. W.) from Pontefracfr; 
containing 490 inhabitants. This place comprises about 
870 acres, and is situated at the confluence of the rivers 
Aire and Calder, where extensive wharfs and stations 
have been constructed by the Aire and Calder Com- 
pany : part of the houses near the bridge form a suburb 
of Castleford. Large glass-works have been established. 
The tithes were commuted for land and a money pay- 
ment, by an inclosure act, in 1803. 



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A LLE 



ALLERTON, CHAPEL, a parish, in the union of 
AXBRIDGE, hundred of BEMPSTONE, E. division of 
SOMERSET, 3 milts (S.) from Cross ; : containing 331 
inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 1(X 8.4.; net income^ 223; 
patrons, Dean and Chapter of Wells. There are 15 
acres of glebe. The church is a small edifice, and was 
formerly a chapel to Wedmore. 

ALLERTON, CHAPEL, W. riding of the county of 
YORK. See CHAPEL-ALLERTON. 

ALLERTON-MAULEVERER (Sr. MARTIN), a pa- 
rish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of CLARO, 
W. riding of YORK, 4| miles (E.) from Knaresborough ; 
containing 277 inhabitants, of whom 258 are in the 
township of Allerton-Mauleverer with Hopperton. This 
place obtained its distinguishing name from the family 
of Mauleverer, one of whom, named Richard, in the 
reign of Henry II., founded here an Alien priory of 
Benedictine monks, the revenue of which was given by 
Henry VI. to King's College, Cambridge. The parish is 
wholly the property of Lord Stourton, and comprises 2J70 
acres,, of which 1 1 80 are arable, 820 meadow and pas- 
ture, and 170 woodland and plantations. The mansion, 
which, with the estate, was purchased by his lordship's 
father for 163,800, is a handsome structure, in the 
Grecian style ; and attached to it is a neat Roman 
Catholic chapeL The village is pleasantly situated 
about half a mile from the great north road between 
London- and Edinburgh. The living is a perpetual 
curacy; net income, 65 ; patron, Lord Stourton. The 
church is an ancient cruciform structure. A school, 
attended by thirty children of both sexes,, chiefly of 
Catholic parents, is supported by Lady Stourton. The 
late Duke of York resided here in 1786, 1787, and 
1789. 

ALLERTON, NORTH (ALL SAINTS), a borough, 
market-town, and parish, and the head of a union, in 
the wapentake and liberty of AL.LERTONSHIRE, N. riding 
of YORK ; comprising the chapelries of Brompton, 
Deighton, and High Worsall, and the townships of Ro- 
manby and North Allerton ; and containing 5273 inha- 
bitants, of whom 3092 are in the town, including the 
extra-parochial liberty of Lazenby, 32 miles (N. W. by 
N.) from York, and 224 (N. N. W.) from London. This 
place, which was a Roman station, and subsequently a 
Saxon borough, is in Domesday book called Alvertune 
and Alreton, the prefix having been applied to distinguish 
it from Allerton-Mauleverer. It was greatly injured, if 
not destroyed, by Beornredus, or Earnredus, who, in 
769, having invaded the kingdom of Northumberland, 
with a view to usurp the throne, burnt the town of 
Catterkk, about eight miles distant. William Rufus 
gave the town, with the lands adjacent, to the see of 
Durham, and, under the patronage of the bishops of that 
diocese, it grew into importance, and became an episco- 
pal residence. At Cowton Moor, about three miles from 
the town, and within the parish, the celebrated battle of 
the Standard was fought, in 1138, between the English, 
commanded by Ralph, Bishop of the Orkney Islands, 
Walter 1'Espee, and William d'Albemarle, and the 
Scots, led on by their king, David, who had ravaged the 
country as far as York, in which the latter were de- 
feated, with the loss of 11,000 men : the spot on which 
the standard was erected is still called Standard Hill, 
and the holes into which the dead were thrown, the 
37 



Scots' Pits. About 1174, Henry II. ordered the episco- 
pal palace, supposed to have been built by Geoffrey, 
Bishop of Durham, and which had been strongly fortified 
by Bishop Pudsey, to be demolished j, it was afterwards 
rebuilt, and again destroyed. Traces of the foundation 
are still visible on the western side of the town. In 
1318, the Scots plundered and burnt the town. During 
the civil war, Charles I., in one of his journeys to Scot- 
land, lodged here in an old mansion, called the Porch- 
house ; and in the rebellion of 1745, the English army, 
under the Duke of Cumberland, encamped on the Castle 
httls. 

The TOWN is pleasantly situated close to the line of 
the Great Northern railway, and consists chiefly of one 
spacious street, half a mile in length, partially paved, 
and containing some good houses ; it has long given 
name to a district called Allertonshire, now constituting 
the wapentake and liberty. The principal branches of 
manufacture are those of tanning and the currying of 
leather; and hand-loom linen weaving is carried on at 
Brompton. The market is on Wednesday ; and fairs 
are held on Feb. 14th, Sept. 5th and 6th, Oct. 3rd and 
4th, and the second Wednesday in the latter month, 
The borough, town, and township are all distinct : the 
borough, which exists by prescription, first exercised the 
elective franchise in the 26th of Edward I., but made no 
subsequent return till 1640; since which time, till the 
2nd William IV., it regularly sent two members to par- 
liament, but was thenceforward destined to return only 
one. The right of election was formerly vested in the 
proprietors of aneient burgage houses,, in number about 
two hundred and ten, but is now extended to the 10 
householders of the townships of North Allerton and 
Romanby, and the chapelry of Brompton, which, by the 
act of the 2nd and 3rd of William. IV. cap. 64, were 
made to constitute the new borough, comprising 8693 
acres, of which 3150 are in North Allerton township : 
the returning officer is a bailiff, appointed by the Bishop 
of Ripon, who is high-bailiff of the whole shire or liberty, 
and lord of the manor of North Allerton. The general 
quarter-sessions for the North riding are held here, as 
directed by the act of the 1st of William IV. cap. 70 \ 
and there is a weekly meeting of the county magistrates. 
The sessions-house is an elegant building, erected about 
1790 ; annexed to it is a house of correction, on the plan 
of Mr. Howard, containing thirty cells. To the west of 
the sessions-house is the registrar's office for the North 
riding, where the Bishop of Ripon holds his courts. 

The parish comprises an. extensive and fertile district 
stretching sixteen miles from north to south, and between 
three and four from east to west ; it is bounded on the 
west by the river Wiske, and intersected by the Sun- 
beck and the North-beck ; the surface is flat, except on 
the west, where it is hilly, and the soil near the town is 
a good loam. The LIVING is a vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 17 ; net income, 697 : patrons, Dean 
and Chapter of Durham ; impropriators, Miss Pierse 
and others : the glebe attached to the benefice comprises 
about 200 acres. The church is a spacious cruciform 
structure, in the Norman and later English styles, .with 
a square tower rising from the centre, and crowned with 
pinnacles at the angles. There are chapels of ease at 
Brompton and Deighton, both ancient buildings ; also 
places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. The 
free grammar (now the parochial) school is of royal 



ALL E 



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foundation : it has a small endowment, arising from a 
bequest by Elizabeth Raine, in 1/37 ; also an interest, 
in five scholarships, founded by Bishop Cosins, at Peter 
House, Cambridge, in a failure of applicants from the 
school at Durham ; and has likewise a contingent inter- 
est in twelve exhibitions to Lincoln College, Oxford, 
founded by Lord Crewe. The school-house was rebuilt 
in 1777- Dr. W. Palliser, Archbishop of Cashel ; Dr. 
George Hickes, Dean of Worcester, and author of the 
" Thesaurus Septentrionalium Linguarum ;" Dr. Thomas 
Burnet, master of the Charter-House, London ; Rymer, 
editor of the Fcedera ; Dr. Radcliffe ; and the Rev. John 
Kettlewell, were educated here. A national school for 
boys and girls, established in 1787, is partly supported 
by subscription. An hospital, or Maison de Dieu, was 
founded in 1476, by Richard de Moore, a draper in the 
town, for thirteen poor people : it has been rebuilt 
at the expense of the inhabitants, but the number of 
inmates is reduced to four. The Rev. John Kettlewell, 
of St. Andrew's, Holborn, bequeathed, in 1694, an estate 
in the township of Brompton, called Low Moor Farm, 
comprising eighty-three acres, and yielding a rental of 
70, of which 40 are applied in support of the national 
schools here and at Brompton, and the residue is laid out 
in clothing and medicine for the poor of those places. 
The union of North Allerton comprises 44 parishes and 
places, and contains a, population of 12,575. There are 
some remains of a monastery of Carmelites, founded by 
Thomas Hat.field, Bishop of Durham, about the year 
1354, and dedicated to St. Mary ; and the site of St. 
James's hospital, about a mile from the town, the 
revenue of which, at the dissolution, was 58. 10. 10., 
is still visible. It is also on record that, in the 14th of 
Edward III., William de Alverton gave the Augustine 
friars eight acres of ground, in the town, on which to 
erect a church and habitation. Vestiges of a military 
road leading from Alby, the Derventio of the Romans, 
through the town to Catterick may be traced. Edmund 
Guest, Bishop of Salisbury, almoner to Queen Eliza- 
beth, was born here. North Allerton, in the reign of 
Anne, gave the title of Viscount to the Elector of Han- 
over, afterwards George I. 

ALLESLEY, or AWESLEY (ALL SAINTS), a parish, 
in the union of MERIDEN, Kirkby division of the hun- 
dred of KNIGHTLOW, N. division of the county of WAR- 
WICK, 2| miles (N. W. by W.) from Coventry ; contain- 
ing 963 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 4242 
acres, in good cultivation ; the surrounding scenery is 
pleasingly varied, and the village is neatly built. Sand- 
stone is quarried for rough building purposes. Fairs 
are held for cattle in February, March, June, August, 
September, October, and December. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 17. 18. 9- ; pa- 
tron and incumbent, Rev. W. T. Bree. The tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 786, and the 
glebe comprises nearly 40 acres. The church is an 
ancient structure in the early and later Norman styles, 
with modern additions in bad taste. There is a free 
school for boys, towards the support of which Mrs. 
Flint, in. 1705, gave by deed a small portion of land, and 
a house for the residence of the master ; and another 
school, for girls, is supported by subscription. Vestiges 
of an ancient castle are discernible in the parish. 

ALLESTREE (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of BELPER, hundred of MORLESTON and LITCHURCH, 
38 



S. division of the county of DERBY, 2 miles (N.) from 
Derby ; containing 507 inhabitants. The parish is situ- 
ated on the river Derwent and the road from Derby to 
Bakewell and Manchester, and comprises 1030 acres, of 
which 900 are pasture, 80 arable, and 50 woodland ; 
the soil is a loam and marl. The living is a perpetual 
curacy, united to the vicarage of Mackworth : the 
church is an ancient structure, containing several 
monuments of the Munday family, and having 300 sit- 
tings, all free. There is a place of worship for Wesley- 
ans ; and schools are partly supported by subscription. 

ALLEXTON. See ALEXTON. 

ALLHALLOWS, a parish, in the union of WIGTON, 
ALLEJIDALE ward below Derwent, W. division of CUM- 
BERLAND, 6f miles (S. W. by S.) from W T igton ; com- 
prising by admeasurement I860 acres, and containing 
235 inhabitants. This place, which was anciently a 
chapelry in the parish of Aspatria, is bounded on the 
south by the river Ellen, and contains some quarries of 
freestone and limestone, and a vein of coal of inferior 
quality. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 
80 ; patron and appropriator, Bishop of Carlisle. The 
tithes were partially commuted for land, under an inclo- 
sure act, in 1817. A little southward of Whitehall is 
an intrenchment, twenty-eight yards square, surrounded 
by a ditch. 

ALLHALLOWS, a parish, in the union and hun- 
dred of Hoo, lathe of AYLESFORD, W. division of KENT, 
9 miles (N. E.) from Rochester ; containing 268 inha- 
bitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in 
the king's books at 8. 7- 11., and in the patronage of 
the Dean and Chapter of Rochester : the appropriate 
tithes, belonging to the Dean and Chapter, have been 
commuted for a rent- charge of 620, with a glebe of 
11 acres, and those of the incumbent for one of 185, 
with a glebe of 39 acres. The river Thames bounds 
this parish on the north. 

ALLINGTON (ST. SWITHJN), a parish, in the union 
of BRTDPORT, hundred of GODDERTHORNE, Bridport 
division of DORSET, f of a mile (N. W.) from Bridport; 
containing 1545 inhabitants. This parish, formerly a 
chapelry in that of Bridport, comprises 582a. 3r. 5p., of 
which 281 acres are arable, 249 pasture, and 51 home- 
steads. The river Brid, or Birt, runs through the locality, 
which may be considered as a continuation of the town 
of Bridport, and is within the limits of the borough. 
Great quantities of hemp and flax are raised in the 
vicinity, and a manufacture of home and sail cloth is 
carried on, which affords employment to a considerable 
number of persons. A fair for cheese and pedlery is 
held on the first Wednesday in August. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rev. Henry Fox : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
190. The church is a modern edifice in the Grecian 
style, erected in 1827, and contains 800 sittings, of 
which 400 are free. Two closes of land, containing 
thirty acres, are vested in trustees for the benefit of the 
poor in the almshouses of this parish and Charmouth. 
An hospital for lepers, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, 
was founded here, which, at the dissolution in 1553, 
was valued at 7. 8. 4. An ancestor of the celebrated 
John Wesley was ejected from the ministry of Allington 
as a non-juror. 

ALLINGTON (ST. LAWRENCE), a parish, in the 
union of MALLING, hundred of LARKFIELD, lathe of 



ALLI 



ALM E 



AYLESFORD, W. division of KENT, if mile (N. N. W.) 
from Maidstone ; containing 49 inhabitants. It is 
situated on the western side of the Medway, nearly 
opposite Aylesford. The living is a discharged rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 6. 16. 8. ; net income, 
145, with a glebe-house, recently built ; patron, Earl 
of Romney. Sir Thomas Wyatt, a distinguished poet 
in, the reign of Henry VIII., was born at Allington 
Castle, the remains of which have been converted into a 
farm-house. 

ALLINGTON, a tything, in the parish and union of 
SOUTH STONEHAM, hundred of MANSBRIDGE, South- 
ampton and S, divisions of the county of SOUTHAMP- 
TON ; containing 536 inhabitants. 

ALLINGTON, a parish, in the union and hundred 
of AMESBURY, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions 
of WILTS, 3| miles (E. S. E.) from Amesbury ; contain- 
ing 94 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 14. 13. 4.; net income, 236 ; 
patron, Earl of Craven. 

ALLINGTON, a tything, in the parish, union, and 
hundred of CHIPPENHAM, Chippenham and Calne, and 
N. divisions of WILTS, 2^ miles (N. W. by W.) from 
Chippenham. 

ALLINGTON, a tything, in the parish of ALLCAN- 
NINGS, union of DEVIZES, hundred of SWANBOROUGH, 
Devizes and N. divisions of WILTS, 4 miles (E. N. E.) 
from Devizes ; containing 188 inhabitants. The tithes 
belong to the Dean and Canons of Westminster. There 
is a place of worship for a congregation of Particular 
Baptists. 

ALLINGTON, EAST (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in 
the union of KINGSBRIDGE, hundred of STANBOROUGH, 
Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of DEVON, 
3^ miles (N. E. by N.) from Kingsbridge ; containing 
729 inhabitants, and comprising 2348 acres. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 32. 2. 1., 
and in the patronage of Mrs. Fortescue : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 485, and the glebe 
consists of 80 acres. In the church is a wooden screen, 
which, with the pulpit, is much enriched with carved 
work. 

ALLINGTON, EAST (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the 
union of NEWARK, wapentake of WINNIBRIGGS and 
THREO, parts of KESTEVEN, county of LINCOLN, 5 miles 
(N. W.) from Grantham ; containing 276 inhabitants. 
The living is consolidated with a mediety of the rectory 
of Sedgebrook, to the incumbent of which an allotment 
of land was given as a commutation for the tithes of 
the manor, by an inclosure act, in 1793. 

ALLINGTON, WEST, DEVON. See ALVINGTON, 
WEST. 

ALLINGTON, WEST (HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in 
the union of NEWARK, wapentake of WINNIBRIGGS and 
THREO, parts of KESTEVEN, county of LINCOLN, 5^ 
miles (N. W. by W.) from Grantham ; containing 120 
inhabitants. In this parish is the seat of T. Earle Wel- 
by, Esq., a handsome edifice, partly in the Elizabethan 
style, and commanding a distant view of Foston and the 
city of Lincoln. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 3. 13. 11|., and in the patronage of 
the Crown ; net income, 262. 

ALLITHWAITE, LOWER, a township, in the 
parish of CARTMEL, union of ULVERSTONE, hundred of 
LONSDALE, north of the Sands, N. division of the county 
39 



of LANCASTER, 2 miles (S.) from Cartmel ; containing 
807 inhabitants. 

ALLITHWAITE, UPPER, a township, in the parish 
of CARTMEL, union of ULVERSTONE, hundred of LONS- 
DALE, north of the Sands, N. division of the county of 
LANCASTER, 3^ miles (N. E.) from Cartmel ; containing 
740 inhabitants. 

ALLONBY, a chapelry, in the parish of BROMFIELD, 
union of WIGTON, ALLERDALE ward below Derwent, 
W. division of CUMBERLAND, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from 
Cockermouth ; containing 811 inhabitants. The vil- 
lage, comprising about 200 houses, is situated on the 
coast of Allonby bay, which opens to the Solway Firth 
and the Irish Sea, and is much frequented as a bathing- 
place, the sands being extremely smooth and firm. It 
was noted for a herring fishery, but this has greatly de- 
clined, owing to the herrings having almost totally de- 
serted the neighbouring sea ; a few of the inhabitants 
are, however, still occupied in fishing. The living is a 
perpetual curacy ; net income, 94 > patron, Vicar of 
Bromfield. The chapel, dedicated to Christ, was built at 
the expense of Dr. Thomlinson and some relatives, in 
1744; and a school was endowed in 1755, by Mrs. 
Thomlinson, his relict, with 100, since laid out in land 
producing 8 per annum. There is a place of worship 
for the Society of Friends. Six cottages, forming the 
wings of a dwelling-house erected by Thomas Richard- 
son, Esq., of Stamford Hill, London, a native of this 
place, are appropriated as rent-free residences to as 
many poor families. Captain Joseph Huddart, F.R.S., 
an eminent naval engineer and hydrographer, was born 
here in 1741, and in the chapel is a handsome monu- 
ment erected to his memory, at a cost of 500. 

ALLOSTOCK, a township, in the parish of GREAT 
BUDWORTH, union and hundred of NORTHWICH, S. 
division of the county of CHESTER, 5 miles (S. by W.) 
from Nether Knutsford ; containing 427 inhabitants. 
There is a place of worship for Unitarians. The children 
of all persons in this township who rent property under 
the value of 10 per annum are entitled to instruction 
at the parochial school of Lower Peover. 

ALLOWENSHAY, a hamlet, in the parish of KINGS- 
TON, union of CHARD, hundred of TINTINHULL, W. 
division of SOMERSET; containing 212 inhabitants. 

ALLSTONEFIELD. See ALSTONFIELD. 

ALLTON, with IDRIDGEHAY, a township, in the pa- 
rish of WIRKSWORTH, union of BELPER, hundred of 
APPLETREE, S. division of the county of DERBY, 3^ 
miles (S.) from Wirksworth ; containing 194 inhabit- 
ants. 

ALLWINTON. See ALLENTON. 

ALMELEY (ST. MARY), a parish, partly in the 
hundred of WOLPHY, but chiefly in that of STRETFORD, 
union of WEOBLEY, county of HEREFORD, 4^ miles 
(S. E.) from Kington, near the road to Hereford ; con- 
taining 642 inhabitants. It comprises 3352 acres, of 
which 1500 are meadow and pasture, 1300 arable, and 
552 woodland ; the surface is undulated and extensively 
wooded; and the soil, for the most part, is a sandy 
loam, having a wet sub-soil of marl and clay. A tram 
railway for the conveyance of coal from Brecon to 
Kington passes through the parish. The living is a 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 6. 17- 11.; 
patron and appropriator, Bishop of Hereford. The 
great tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 



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300, and the vicarial for 20?. 10. ; the appropriate 
glebe contain* 19, and the vicarial 55, acres. The church 
is partly in the Norman, and partly in the English 
style. About three-quarters of a mile north-west of it 
there was probably once a castle, part of the ditch, &c., 
being traceable, and the farm there called Old Castle.; 
and near the church are two tumuli. Sir John Old- 
castle, Lord Cobham, executed in 1417 for his attach- 
ment to the Lollards, was a native of the parish. 

ALMER .(-Sx. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BLANOFORD, hundred of LOOSEBARROW, Winbourn di- 
vision of DORSET, 5f miles ,(S. S. E.) from Blandford- 
Forum ; containing, with the hamlet of Mapperton, ISQ 
inhabitants. It comprises 1129 acres of land, present- 
ing a flat appearance, and the soil of which is light, with 
a chalk and gravel bottom. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 13. 5. 8., and in the pa- 
tronage of Mrs. Drax ; net income, 284. The glebe 
consists of 35 acres. The church is a small edifice, re- 
built by General Erie. There is a school in connexion 
with the National Society. 

ALMHOLME, a hamlet, in the parish of ARKSEY, 
union of DON.CASTER, N. division of the wapentake of 
STRAFFORTH and TICKHILI,, W. riding of YORK, 3 miles 
(N. by E.) from Doncaster ; containing 69 inhabitants. 
The term holme or holmes is a generic name for low 
and level pasture lands near water, which is descriptive 
of the neigh bourhood of this place. The hamlet is situ- 
ated in the north-eastern extremity of the parish ; the 
river Don runs a little on the east, and on the north 
flows a tributary to that river. 

ALMINGTON, a township, in the parish of DRAY- 
TON-IN-HALES, union of MARKET-DRAYTON, N. division 
of the hundred of PIREHILL and of the county of STAF- 
FORD, 1^ mile (E. by N.) from Dray ton ; containing 18Q 
inhabitants. 

ALMINGTON, with STONE- DELPH, a township, in 
the parish and union of TAMWORTH, Tamworth division 
of the hundred of HEMLINGFORD, N. division of the 
county of WARWICK, 2f miles (E.) from Tamworth $ 
containing 276 inhabitants, and comprising 2191 acres. 
It is intersected by the river Anker, the Coventry canal, 
and the road from Tamworth to Ashby-de-la-Zouch. 

ALMODINGTON, a hamlet (formerly a parish), in 
the parish of EARNLEY, union of WEST HAMPNETT, 
hundred of MANHOOD, rape of CHICHESTER, W. divi- 
sion of SUSSEX, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Chichester. 
The living, a rectory, was consolidated, in 1524, with 
that of Earnley : and the chapel has fallen into ruins. 

ALMONDBURY (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of HUDDERSFIELD, Upper division of the wapen- 
take of AGBRIGG, W. riding of YORK, if mile (S. E.) 
from Huddersfield, on the old road to Sheffield ; com- 
prising the townships of Almondbury, Austonley, Cros- 
land South, Farnley-Tyas, Holme, Honley, Lingards, 
Linthwaite, Lockwood, Marsden, Meltham, Nether- 
Thong, and Upper Thong ; and the hamlets of Berry- 
brow, Crosland Moor, Deanhouse, Meltham Mills, Long- 
ley, Lowerhouses, Netherton, and Rashcliffe ; and con- 
taining 37315 inhabitants, of whom 8828 are in the 
township of Almondbury. According to Camden, this 
was the Cambodunum of Antoninus,! the site of which 
was on the summit of a neighbouring hill, where there 
are still some vestiges of a rampart and the remains of 
a fortification ; but some later writers are of opinion 
40 



that these are Saxons remains, as no Roman relics have 
ever been found, and there are no ancient roads leading 
to it. The same author states that in the early Saxon 
times it was a royal vill, and had a church, built by 
Paulinus, and dedicated to St. Alban, from which cir- 
cumstance the name Albanbury, since softened into 
Almondbury. This church is supposed to have been 
afterwards burnt in the war between Penda, King of 
Merda, and Edwin of Northumbria, the latter of whom 
had a palace here ; and it appears that no church from 
that period was known till after the year 1090, when 
the manor came into the possession of the Lacy family, 
of whom Alice de Lacy and her son Henry, presented to 
the rectory in 1187, prior to which time a church had 
been erected most probably by Gilbert de Lacy, the first 
lord. The inhabitants of this populous and extensive 
district are principally engaged in the manufacture of 
fancy goods and woollen cloth, for which there are nu- 
merous establishments. The parish comprises 26,055o. 
3r. 37p. ; there are several coal-mines, and the produce 
of some stone-quarries is chiefly applied to building 
purposes. In the 39th of George IIL an act was passed 
for inclosing the waste lands in the townships of North 
Crosland and Honley ; in the 9th of George IV. one 
for reclaiming those in the townships of Austonley and 
Upper Thong ; and in 1830 similar acts were passed 
for Meltham and Nether-Thong: in 1837 an act was 
procured for making and maintaining certain reservoirs 
in the parish. Fairs are held annually on Easter and 
Whit-Mondays, and on Nov. 23rd for swine and cattle. 
The LIVING is a vicarage, valued in the king's books 
at 20. 7- 11- ; net income, 250 ; patrons and impro- 
priators, Governors of Clitheroe school, to whom the 
rectory, &c., were given by the crown at the dissolu- 
tion, previously to which they had belonged to the Col- 
lege of Jesus, at Rotherham : there are 16 acres of glebe, 
with a good vicarage- house, rebuilt about 1774. The 
church, an ancient and venerable structure, erected on 
the site of the original church in 1552, and which had 
fallen into a state of general dilapidation, was, in 1840, 
through the spirited efforts of a few of the inhabitants, 
thoroughly repaired and completely restored, with the 
most scrupulous regard to the preservation of its pris- 
tine character, and is one of the most beautiful churches 
in the West riding ; many of the elegant windows which 
had been long concealed, were opened ; and the beau- 
tiful screen that divided the chancel from the nave, and 
which was almost entirely destroyed, was perfectly re- 
stored. At the end of the north aisle is a chapel belong- 
ing to the Earl of Dartmouth, and at the extremity of 
the south aisle one belonging to the Beaumont family : 
there are two oak chests of great antiquity richly carved ; 
and round the upper part of the walls, close to the ceil- 
ing, are some verses in Saxon characters : in the north 
and south walls of the chancel are some portions of the 
original church incorporated in the present edifice. 
There are also churches at Holme Bridge, Crosland, 
Farnley-Tyas, Linthwaite, Meltham, Lockwood, Mars- 
den, Nether-Thong, and Honley ; that at Farnley built 
by the Earl of Dartmouth in 1840 : and within the 
township of Almondbury are two places of worship for 
Wesleyan Methodists, and one for the New Connexion. 
A free grammar school was founded by letters -patent of 
James I., of which the annual income amounts to 91, 
arising from lands and rent-charges demised by Robert 



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Nettleton and other benefactors ; and there is also a 
national school for 150 children. In 1724, Israel Wor- 
mall bequeathed land, the produce of which he directed 
to be applied towards instructing and apprenticing chil- 
dren of this place ; and the poor of Almondbury have 
property yielding a considerable rental, which is appro- 
priated to their relief. 

ALMONDSBURY (ST. MARY THE VIRGIN"), a parish, 
in the union of THORNBURY, comprising the tything of 
Almondsbury, in the Lower division of the hundred of 
BERKELEY, the tythings of Gaunts-Earthcote and Lea, 
in the Lower division of that of THORNBURY, and 
the tythings of Hempton and Patchway, Over, and Lower 
Tockington, in the Lower division of the hundred of 
LANGLEY and SWINEHEAD, W. division of the county 
of GLOUCESTER ; and containing 1584 inhabitants, of 
whom 603 are in Almondsbury tything, 7 miles (N. by 
E.) from Bristol. This parish, which is situated near 
the river Severn, comprises 6927 acres of rich pasture 
land in good cultivation j sandstone is quarried chiefly 
for rough building purposes. The village is situated at 
the foot of a ridge of limestone rocks, in which lead-ore 
has been found in small quantities, and of which the old 
roof of Berkeley castle was partly composed ; and the 
views from the heights, along which passes the road 
from Gloucester to Bristol, are extensive, embracing the 
whole estuary of the Severn, and the opposite coast of 
Wales. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to 
the see of Gloucester and Bristol, and valued in the 
king's books at 20 : the tithes have been commuted 
fora rent-charge of 1150. 13. 4., and there are two 
acres of glebe. The church, situated in that part of the 
parish which is in the hundred of Berkeley, is a very 
handsome cruciform structure, in the early English 
style, with a tower and spire at the intersection ; it has 
been extensively repaired and altered within the last few 
years, and contains 700 free sittings. There is a place 
of worship for Wesleyans. Here is a school with a 
small endowment, bequeathed by the late Mr. John 
Silcox ; and a national school, erected at an expense 
of 250, is endowed with 30 per annum from lands 
left by an unknown benefactor for the use of the 
church, producing 210 per annum. A school is also 
supported by Mr. Lippincolt ; and two cottages and 
three acres of land were bequeathed by Mr. Jefferies for 
widows or widowers. 

ALMSFORD (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of WINCANTON, hundred of CATSASH, E. division of 
SOMERSET, % of a mile (N.) from Castle-Gary ; con- 
taining 293 inhabitants, and comprising 844a. Ir. ISp. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
7. 12. 1.; patron and rector, Rev. George Thomas 
Chamberlaine. The tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 215, and the glebe consists of 60 acres, 
with a glebe-house. The church is a small neat struc- 
ture. 

ALNE (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of EASING- 
WOULD, wapentake of BULMER, N. riding of YORK ; 
comprising the townships of Aldwark, Alne, Flawith, 
Tholthorp, Tollerton, and Youlton ; and containing 
1703 inhabitants, of whom 494 are in the township of 
Alne, 4^ miles (S. S. W.) from Easingwould. The parish 
contains by computation 10,900 acres, of which 1900 
are in the township of Alne, and are chiefly arable ; the 
surface is level, and the land comprises every variety of 
VOL. I. 41 



soil. A fair for cattle and sheep is held on the Tuesday 
next after the 8th of Oct. The Great Northern railway 
passes through the parish. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 10 ; net income, 
370 ; patron and impropriator, Sir C. B. Codrington : 
a small glebe-house was obtained by exchange with the 
patron, in 1842. The church, an ancient edifice, with a 
square tower, was repewed about thirty years since. 
There are places of worship for Wesleyans at Alne, and 
Tollerton ; where, and at Aldwark and Tholthorp, are 
also schools. Remains exist of a religious house, which 
was subordinate to St. Mary's, at York. 

ALNE, GREAT (ST. MARY MAGDALENE), a parish, 
in the union of ALCESTER, Alcester division of the 
hundred of BARLICHWAY, S. division of the county of 
WARWICK, 2f miles (N. E. by E.) from Alcester ; con- 
taining 404 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 
1800 acres, and is bounded on the south, and partly on 
the east, by the river Alne. The living is a rectory, an- 
nexed, with the perpetual curacy of Weethley, to the 
rectory of Kinwarton : the church has been enlarged 
within the last few years. Part of the glebe belonging 
to Kinwarton rectory is situated in this parish. 

ALNESBORNE, an extra-parochial district (locally 
in the parish of NACTON), in the hundred of COLNEIS, 
E. division of SUFFOLK, 2^ miles (S. E.) from Ipswich, 
and adjoining the river Orwell ; containing 39 inhabit- 
ants. Here was formerly a small priory of Austin 
Canons, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and suppressed 
about the year 1466 ; there are still the remains of a 
chapel. 

ALNEY, a small island in the river Severn, partly 
in the parish of MAISEMORE, E. division of the county 
of GLOUCESTER, and partly in -those of ST. MARY-DE- 
LODE and ST. NICHOLAS, city of GLOUCESTER. This 
island, which is formed by a division of the river into 
two streams, and comprehends several acres of rich 
pasture land, was by the Saxons called Oleneag, and is 
memorable for the interview which took place here, in 
1016, between Edmund, King of the Saxons, and Canute, 
leader of the Danes, whose armies had been drawn up at 
Deerhurst in battle array for some time, without either 
giving the signal for the attack. Edmund at length 
challenged Canute to single combat, which the latter 
refused on the plea of inequality} but proposed a re- 
ference to the principal officers of both armies, which 
was accepted by Edmund, and, after a short conference 
on this island, peace was concluded between them by a 
partition of the kingdom. 

ALNHAM (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union of 
ROTH BURY, N. division of COQUETDALE ward, and 
of NORTHUMBERLAND ; consisting of the townships of 
Alnham, Prendwick, Screnwood, and Unthank, and con- 
taining 256 inhabitants, of whom 141 are in the town- 
ship of Alnham, 6 miles from Whittingham, and 14 (W.) 
from Alnwick. The parish forms part of the Cheviot 
range of mountains, and comprises about 12,000 acres, 
almost entirely occupied as sheep-walks : excellent 
building stone is obtained. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, endowed with part of the great tithes, and 
valued in the king's books at 3. 17- 1-j net income, 
74 ; patron, Duke of Northumberland ; impropriator 
of the remainder of the great tithes, J. C. Tarleton, Esq. 
There are about ten acres of glebe. The church has 
a plain Norman arch between the nave and chancel. 

G 



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Near it are the ruins of an ancient tower, which his 
Grace is now fitting up for a parsonage ; and on Castle 
Hill is a semicircular encampment, defended by a high 
double rampart and deep trench, within which is a range 
of uncemented stones. 

ALNMOUTH, or ALEMOUTH, a small sea-port, and 
township, in the parish of LESBURY, union of ALNWICK, 
S. division of BAMBROUGH ward, N. division of NORTH- 
UMBERLAND, 5^ miles (E. S. E.) from Alnwick ; con- 
taining 480 inhabitants. This place, which takes its 
name from its situation on a tongue of land projecting 
into the sea, near the mouth of the river Aln, com- 
prises 180 acres of land, of a light turnip soil, in equal 
portions of arable and pasture ; the scenery is undulated, 
and there are good land and sea views ; stone for build- 
ing is procured from the rocks on the shore. Mr. Edward 
Thew, of Lesbury House, has a steam flour-mill here, and 
ships large quantities of corn ; and there is an exten- 
sive timber-yard, belonging to Mr. Hindmars , of Aln- 
wick. Formerly a considerable trade was carried on, 
consisting principally in the export of corn, flour, eggs, 
and pork to London, and of wool to the manufacturing 
districts of Yorkshire, but the trade is now limited, and 
the business of ship-building, which prevailed here, has 
entirely declined. To the port, which is subordinate to 
that of Berwick, belong several vessels, varying from 60 
to 150 tons' burthen. The village is resorted to for sea- 
bathing, and the sands, being very firm, form a fine 
promenade ; hot baths are always in readiness at the 
Schooner inn. By an encroachment of the sea, and a 
change in the course of the river, a small island has 
been formed, on which, until 1806, were the remains of 
an old chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, the 
site of which was originally on the main land. The 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge amount- 
ing to 30. 1. 6., of which 26. 15. 10. are payable to 
the vicar, who has a glebe of about three-quarters of an 
acre, 2. 3. 1. to the clerk, and 1. 2. 7. to the sexton, 
of the parish. There is a place of worship for Wesley- 
ans ; and a school-house was built in 1826, at the ex- 
pense of a benevolent individual. 

ALNWICK (Sr. MARY 
AND ST. MICHAEL), a market- 
town and parish, and the 
head of a union, in the E. 
division of COQUETDALE 
ward, N. division of NORTH- 
UMBERLAND, of which it is 
the county town, 33 miles (N. 
by W.) from Newcastle, and 
306 (N. by W.) from Lon- 
don ; comprising the town- 
ships of Alnwick, South- 
Corporation Seal. side> Shieldykes, Abbey 

Lands, Canongate, Denwick, and Hulne Park, and con- 
taining 6626 inhabitants. This place, which is of great 
antiquity, was occupied at a very early period by the 
Danes or Saxons, who, from its situation near the river 
Alne, called it Ealnwic, and built a strong castle for its 
defence on a site supposed to have been previously 
occupied by a Roman fortress, which, after the Norman 
Conquest, became the baronial residence of Ivo de Vescy, 
lord of Alnwick, to whom the barony had been given 
by the Conqueror. In 1093, the castle was besieged by 
Malcolm III., King of Scotland, and bravely defended 
42 




by Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland ; upon which oc- 
casion Malcolm and his son Edward were both killed ; 
the former, according to the Chronicle of Alnwick Abbey, 
by one of the garrison, under pretence of presenting to 
him, in token of submission, the keys of the fortress at 
the point of a lance ; and the latter in his eagerness to 
revenge the death of his father, in an unguarded assault 
of the enemy, in which he received a mortal wound. 
The remembrance of this event is preserved by a cross 
erected about a mile north of the town, on the spot 
where the Scottish monarch is supposed to have fallen j 
it was rebuilt in 1774 by the Duchess of Northum- 
berland, a lineal descendant of that king, and is still 
called Malcolm's Cross. In 1135, the town, which 
during the border wars was constantly an object of 
attack, was taken by David, King of Scotland ; and 
in 1174 it was besieged by William, at the head of 
80,000 Scottish forces, but was successfully defended by 
William de Vescy, Robert de Stuteville, Ranulph de 
Glanville, and others, who took" the Scottish monarch 
prisoner, and sent him to London, where he was kept 
in confinement till released by his subjects, who paid 
100,000 for his ransom. In 1215, the town was 
nearly reduced to ashes by King John ; but it appears 
to have been speedily rebuilt, for, within five years from 
that date, Gualo, the pope's legate, summoned a general 
council of the Scottish bishops to be held here, for the 
regulation of some ecclesiastical abuses. In 1328, it 
was again besieged by the Scots under Robert Bruce, 
but without success ; and in 1411, the castle was em- 
battled and the town surrounded with a strong wall, to 
protect it from the predatory incursions of the Scots. 
Notwithstanding these fortifications, it was again as- 
sailed by the Scots, who in 1448 set fire to it, in retalia- 
tion for the burning of Dumfries by the English. After 
the battle of Hexham, in 1463, the castle, which was in 
the interest of the House of Lancaster, was summoned 
by the Earl of Warwick ; but the garrison, though unable 
to sustain a protracted siege, retained possession, till 
they were relieved by Sir George Douglas, who, arriving 
at the head of a considerable force, afforded them an 
opportunity of retiring unmolested. 

The TOWN is pleasantly situated on the irregular 
declivity of an eminence rising from the bank of the 
river Alne, over which, at the northern extremities, 
are two neat stone bridges. The streets are spacious, 
well paved, and lighted with gas ; the houses, which are 
built of stone, are chiefly of modern erection ; and the 
inhabitants are amply supplied with water from cisterns 
and reservoirs, and by pumps in various parts of the 
town, erected at the expense of the corporation. Near 
the south entrance of the town is a fine column, eighty- 
three feet in height, erected upon an eminence at the 
side of the turnpike-road : it is called the Percy Tenantry 
Column, from having been raised by the agricultural 
tenantry of the Duke of Northumberland, in 1816, in 
grateful commemoration of his Grace's liberality at 
various periods, when the distress of the times had 
rendered the payment, of rent in many cases difficult, 
and in some altogether impracticable. An elegant 
column was also erected in 1814, on Camp Hill near 
the town, in commemoration of the various victories 
obtained by the British during the war, and of the 
restoration of peace. A subscription library was esta- 
blished in 17S3 ; but this was dissolved in 1833, and an 



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A L.N W 



improved institution was formed in 1834, which now 
contains nearly 2000 volumes. In 1824, a mechanics' 
institute was founded, for which a handsome building 
was erected in 1831, containing a lecture-room, library, 
and other accommodations. Assemblies are held in a 
spacious building in the market-place, part of which is 
also appropriated as a reading-room : a savings' bank 
was established in 1815. The trade and manufactures 
of the place are not of much importance ; yet there 
are some extensive breweries and tanneries, and the 
parish abounds with coal, limestone, freestone, and whin- 
stone. The market, abundantly supplied with corn and 
provisions, is held on Saturday ; fairs, for cattle and 
horses, are held on May 12th, the last Monday in July, 
and the first Tuesday in Oct.; and there are also 
other fairs, on the first Saturday in March and in 
November for hiring servants. On the eve of the July 
fair, the inhabitants of certain of the manors and 
townships, owing suit and service to the Duke of North- 
umberland, send deputies to attend the bailiff in the 
ceremony of proclamation ; they afterwards keep watch 
and ward in the several quarters of the town for the 
remainder of the night, by which service they obtain 
exemption from toll within the town during the fair. A 
new fish-market, erected at the expense of his Grace, 
was opened April 20th, 1830. 

Alnwick is a BOROUGH by prescription, having no 
royal charter of incorporation ; though, from the capri- 
cious mode of choosing the freemen, which is ascribed 
to King John, it would appear that its prescriptive right 
was at least tacitly acknowledged by that sovereign ; an 
established corporation is also recognised by an in- 
operative charter of Henry III., as well as by several 
ancient existing grants of the De Vescy family. The 
present corporation consists of twenty-four common- 
councilmen, and four chamberlains are chosen from 
among them, who, at a council meeting held on the 
2Qth of September, nominate eight out of their num- 
ber, and return their names to the steward of the 
manor, by whom, at the next court leet held for the 
manor, four are appointed to act as chamberlains for 
the ensuing year. The common-councilmen are chosen 
from among the resident freemen of the several incor- 
porated companies or fraternities, of which there are 
ten, viz., the Cordwainers, Skinners and Glovers, 
Merchants, Tanners, Weavers, Blacksmiths, Butchers, 
Joiners, Tailors, and Coopers. A chamberlain's clerk 
and other officers are appointed by the common-coun- 
cilmen. The freedom is inherited by the sons of free- 
men, provided they have first been made free of one of 
the trading companies ; it may also be acquired by a 
servitude of seven years to a freeman residing in the 
borough. Each candidate, on taking up his freedom, is 
subjected to the ludicrous ceremony of passing through 
a miry pool, thence called the " Freemen's well." A 
bailiff is appointed by the Duke of Northumberland 
for the manor of Alnwick. The corporation possess no 
magisterial authority, the town being wholly within the 
jurisdiction of the county magistrates, who hold petty- 
sessions on the first and third Saturday in every month. 
Courts leet and baron are held at Easter and at 
Michaelmas, under the Duke of Northumberland, as 
lord of the manor ; and a manorial court is held also 
for the township of Canongate. The quarter-sessions 
for the county take place here at Michaelmas, in rotation 
43 



with Hexham, Morpeth, and Newcastle. The county 
court is held here monthly ; and the election of parlia- 
mentary representatives for the northern division of the 
county, and also the election of coroners for the county, 
take place at Alnwick. The town hall, erected in 1731, 
is a handsome stone building, surmounted by a square 
tower, and stands on the west side of the market-place, 
an extensive area in the centre of the town, on the south 
side of which is a large building, erected by the Duke 
of Northumberland, containing in the upper part a 
spacious and splendid assembly-room, and a news- 
room, and affording underneath a covered area for the 
sale of butchers' meat, fish, and poultry. The house of 
correction, near the Green Bat, was erected in 1807, 
and comprises nine sleeping cells, a. work -room, a day- 
room, and two airing yards, but there is not sufficient 
room for the classification of prisoners. 

The LIVING is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 175 ; 
patron and impropriator, Duke of Northumberland. 
The church is a spacious and venerable structure, in the 
later style of English architecture, with a neat tower, 
and consists of a nave, north and south aisles, and a 
chancel. The roof of the chancel is richly groined and 
ornamented ; on the sides are some ancient stalls carved 
in tabernacle work ; and at the east end are three altar- 
tombs, on which are recumbent figures of stone finely 
sculptured, but without date or inscription. The chan- 
cel was repaired and beautified in 1781, by the first 
Duke of Northumberland, and in 1818, the church was 
repewed, and repaired, when the present duke contri- 
buted 300 towards the expense. On repairing the 
north aisle, two statues of stone, one representing a 
king and the other supposed to be that of a martyr, 
were found about two feet below the surface of the 
ground, and are now placed beneath the tower, at the 
western extremity of the church. There are places of 
worship for Independents, a United Secession Relief 
congregation, Presbyterians, Wesleyans, New Connexion 
of Methodists, and Unitarians ; and a Roman Catholic 
chapel rebuilt in 1836. The borough grammar school for 
the education of the children of freemen, has an endow- 
ment of about 14 per annum, arising from the corn- 
tolls, and a rent-charge. The English school is also 
supported by the corporation; an annuity of 10 was 
bequeathed to it, in 1726, by Mark Forster, who also 
left a house and garden for the use of the master. A 
school for 200 boys was founded in 1810, by the Duke 
of Northumberland, in commemoration of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the accession of George III. ; and a 
school has been instituted by the Duchess, for clothing 
and instructing 50 girls. An infants' school, projected 
in commemoration of the Queen's coronation, was 
opened in 1839, and is supported by subscription. A 
dispensary was established in 1815. The poor law 
union of Alnwick comprises 62 parishes or places, and 
contains a population of 18,768. 

The ancient CASTLE, now the magnificent residence of 
the Duke of Northumberland, is a noble and stately 
structure, comprising two wards, and has been put into 
a state of thorough repair by the grandfather of the pre- 
sent owner, with a due regard to the preservation of its 
original style, and its ancient character as one of the 
most splendid baronial residences in the kingdom : the 
extensive park and demesnes abound with beauti- 
fully varied walks, commanding a rich diversity of 

G2 



A LN W 



A LPI 



scenery, and a fine assemblage of strikingly interesting 
objects, among which the venerable ruins of Alnwick 
and Hulne abbeys are conspicuous. On the south-west 
side of the town stands Swansfield, the residence of 
Prideaux Selby, Esq., which is a plain stone structure, 
situated in grounds of varied and picturesque character, 
and commands beautiful prospects ; and from Alnbank 
House and Freelands, the residences of the respec- 
tive proprietors, Luke Hindmarsh, Esq., and Thomas 
Skelly, Esq., are also obtained fine views of the sur- 
rounding country. There are some remains of the 
ancient town walls, which were defended by four 
square massive gateway towers, of which Bondgate, 
now the only one entire, was built by the son of the 
renowned Hotspur ; on the site of Pottergate tower 
a handsome tower gateway has been erected, in the 
later style of English architecture. Alnwick Abbey was 
founded in 1147, by Eustace Fitz-John, who endowed 
it for Praemonstratensian canons, and dedicated it 
to St. James and the Blessed Virgin : the abbot was 
summoned to parliament in the reigns of Edward I. 
and II. It continued to flourish till the dissolution, at 
which time its revenue was estimated at 194. 7- : the 
only remains are a gateway, which has been fitted up 
as a lodge to the parks (which are stocked with deer, 
and a very fine breed of buffaloes), and, with the abbey 
grounds, forms a highly interesting feature in the park. 
Hulne Abbey, about three miles from the town, but 
within the limits of the Duke's park, is beautifully situ- 
ated on the slope of an eminence. It was founded about 
the year 1240, according to some authorities, by Wil- 
liam de Vescy, and according to others by Ralph Fres- 
born, after returning from the crusades, for Carmelite 
friars, and is said to have been the first house of that 
order established in England ; it was amply endowed 
by William de Vescy and his successors, and Fresborn 
became the first abbot. The site was granted, in the 
reign of Elizabeth, to Thomas Reeve and others, and was 
afterwards purchased by the Percy family, its present 
proprietors. The remains, which are beautifully mantled 
with ivy, are very considerable, and form an interest- 
ing feature in the scenery of the park ; part of the 
abbey buildings has been fitted up as a residence for a 
gamekeeper. Bale, the eminent biographer, was one of 
the brethren of this ancient monastery. Opposite to the 
remains of the abbey, a road, winding round a lofty 
eminence, leads to Brislee Hill, on the summit of which 
is a noble column, ninety feet high, and within it a spiral 
staircase leading to the balcony, which commands an 
extensive and delightful prospect, embracing the hills of 
Cheviot and Teviotdale ; the hill of Flodden ; the castles 
of Bambrough, Dunstanburgh, and Warkworth ; the 
isle of Coquet, the port of Alnmouth, and various other 
interesting objects. Here also was an ancient hospital, 
founded by Eustace de Vescy, and dedicated to St. 
Leonard ; likewise a chapel dedicated to St. Thomas : and 
in Walkergate-street is an old house, the doorway and 
windows of which prove its ecclesiastical origin. AtSheep- 
layers-on-the-Moor, and at Rugley Moorhouse farm, in 
the vicinity of the town, are encampments supposed to 
be of Danish origin, but nothing is recorded of their 
history. In 1726, a workman employed in quarrying 
stone for the repairs of the castle discovered twenty 
swords, sixteen spearheads, and forty celts, all of brass j 
and on the face of the rock under which they were found 
44 



was rudely cut the date 1115. Alnwick gives the title 
of Baron Louvaine of Alnwick to the Earl of Beverley. 

ALPERTON, a hamlet, in the parish of HARROW- 
ON-THE-HiLL, union of HENDON, hundred of GORE, 
county of MIDDLESEX ; containing 242 inhabitants. 

ALPHAMSTONE, a parish, in the union of SUD- 
BURY, hundred of HINCKFORD, N. division of ESSEX, 5 
miles (N. E.) from Halstead ; containing 314 inhabit- 
ants. This parish, which includes the hamlet of Bures, 
and contains 1557. 2r. 3~p., was anciently parcel of 
the possessions of the abbey of Bury-St. Edmund's, 
except a portion that belonged to Richard Fitz-Gilbert, 
which, after the Conquest, was divided among several 
proprietors. The soil is rich, and constitutes fine corn 
land ; the scenery is picturesque. A pleasure fair is 
held on the first Thursday in June. The living is a rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 11, and in the gift 
of the Crown : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 440, and the glebe consists of 28 acres. 
The church, an ancient building of flint, consisting of a 
nave, with a south aisle and chancel, lighted by small 
lancet-shaped windows, is finely situated on an eminence, 
commanding an extensive and richly varied prospect : 
the tower, with the bells, fell down about fifty years 
since. 

ALPHETON, a parish, in the union of SUDBURY, 
hundred of BABERGH, W. division of SUFFOLK, 3 miles 
(N. N. E.) from Long Melford ; containing 321 inhabit- 
ants, and comprising 1200 acres by admeasurement. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
10. 1. 8.; patron and incumbent, Rev. T. G. Dicken- 
son. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 286 ; and there are 40 acres of glebe, with a good par- 
sonage-house, pleasantly situated near the turnpike-road. 
The church contains a mural monument to Lieut. Shep- 
pard, who received a wound in the head at the attack on 
Boulogne in 1805, which caused his death ten years 
after ; the old painted glass has been lately collected, 
and, with the addition of new, formed into two neat 
windows. 

ALPHINGTON (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union of ST. THOMAS, hundred of WONFORD, Wonford 
and S. divisions of DEVON, 1| mile (S.) from Exeter ; 
containing 1286 inhabitants. This place, an ancient 
manor, of which the lords had the power of inflicting 
capital punishment, is skirted by the banks of the Exe, 
which river, as well as the Exeter canal, passes through 
the parish. It comprises 2223 acres by computation ; 
granite is found in some parts, and at the Porkham 
quarry good building stone is obtained. Fairs for cattle 
are held on the first Wednesday after the 20th of June, 
and in the beginning of October. The living is a rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 34. 6. 8., and has 
a net income of 852 j the glebe consists of 27 acres, 
with an excellent parsonage-house built by the late Rev. 
William Ellicombe, whose son, the Rev. Richard Elli- 
combe, is the present patron and incumbent. The church 
contains a circular Norman font, with intersecting arches 
and scroll ornaments. There are a place of worship for 
Wesleyans, and a school in connexion with the National 
Society. 

ALPINGTON, a parish, in the union of LODDON 
and CLAVERING, hundred of LODDON, E. division of 
NORFOLK, l mile (N.) from Brooke, and 6 miles (S. E.) 
from Norwich, on the road to Bungay ; containing 197 



A L R E 



A L RE 



inhabitants, and comprising 530a. 3r. 12p. The living, 
a rectory, is united to Yelverton, and there are no re- 
mains of the church. About 9 acres of land were 
allotted to the poor for fuel, at the time of the inclo- 
sure. 

ALPRAHAM, a township, in the parish of BUNBURY, 
union of NANTWICH, First division of the hundred of 
EDDISBURY, S. division of the county of CHESTER, 3^ 
miles (S. E. by E.) from Tarporley ; containing 520 in- 
habitants. The impropriate tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 106, payable to the Haberdashers' 
Company, London. There is a place of worship for 
Wesleyans. 

ALRESFORD (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of TENDRING, N. division of ESSEX, 65 
miles (S. E. by E.) from Colchester ; containing 289 in- 
habitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the 
river Colne, and takes its name, which is supposed to 
be a modification of Aldersford, from an ancient ford 
across that river : the lands are elevated, and the soil 
generally of a light, sandy quality. The living is a dis- 
charged rectory, valued in the king's books at 8 ; net 
income, 307 ; patrons, Principal and Fellows of Bra- 
senose College, Oxford. The church, a small edifice, 
with a spire of shingles, was, according to an inscription 
in the chancel, written in Norman French, erected by 
Anfrid or Anfrey de Staunton. There is a school in 
connexion with the National Society. 

ALRESFORD, NEW, a market-town and parish, 
and the head of a union, in the liberty of ALRESFORD, 
Alton and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON, 
6 miles (N. E. by E.) from Winchester, and 57 (S. W. 
by W.) from London, on the high road to Winchester j 
containing 1578 inhabitants. This place, which derives 
its name from its situation near a ford on the river Arle, 
was given to the church of Winchester by Cenwalh, 
King of the West Saxons, after his baptism by Bishop 
Birinus ; and about 1220, Godfrey de Lucy, Bishop of 
Winchester, restored the market, then fallen into disuse. 
On May-day, 1690, the town was destroyed by fire, pre- 
viously to which it was so prosperous that there was 
not an individual requiring parochial relief ; and in 
1710 a similar calamity occurred. The parish com- 
prises, by computation, 730 acres j the surface is flat 
in some parts, and in others hilly ; the soil, which is 
light and chalky, is in general good. Alresford pond 
is a fine piece of water, through which runs the river 
Itchen, which divides this parish from Old Alresford. 
The northern embankment is formed by a causeway, 
nearly 500 yards in length, which, previously to the 
construction of the present road through Bishop's-Sut- 
ton, in 1753, constituted part of the main road to 
London : it was accomplished by Bishop de Lucy, 
under a grant from King John, with a view to the 
improvement of his grounds, and to increase the depth 
of the river Itchen, which was formerly navigable to 
Southampton Water, though of late it has ceased to be 
so higher than Winchester ; and as a recompense for 
this arduous undertaking, the bishop obtained, for him- 
self and his successors, the entire royalty of the river 
from the reservoir to the sea. Among the seats in the 
neighbourhood are those of Lord Rodney (formerly the 
residence of his ancestor, the gallant Admiral), Sir 
Henry Tichbourne, Bart., and Lord Ashburton, which 
last, called the Grange, is a beautiful copy of the Par- 
45 



thenon at Athens. The market is on Thursday ; and 
fairs are held on Holy-Thursday, the last Thursdays in 
July and Nov., and the Thursday next after Old Mi- 
chaelmas-day, almost exclusively for sheep. 

Alresford was incorporated at a very early period, and 
returned one representative to parliament in the 23rd 
of Edward I. The corporation consists of a bailiff, ap- 
pointed by the Bishop of Winchester (as lord of the 
manor), and eight burgesses, who, by virtue of a lease 
from the bishop, receive the tolls of the market, but 
exercise no magisterial authority. A court leet is held 
at- Michaelmas, when the bailiff is chosen j and the 
county magistrates hold a petty-session weekly, for the 
division of Alton. The living is a rectory, annexed, 
with that of Medsted, to the rectory of Old Alresford : 
the glebe comprises 18 acres. There are places of wor- 
ship for Independents and Roman Catholics. H. Perrin, 
Esq., in 1698, founded a school for nineteen boys, sons 
of poor tradesmen in the town, and the neighbouring 
villages of Old Alresford, Sutton, and Tichbourne j it is 
endowed with a good house for the master, and fifty- 
two acres of land, now let for 100 per annum. A 
school in connexion with the National Society has also 
been established. The poor law union, of which this 
town is the head, comprises 18 parishes and places, and 
contains a population of 7092. At Bramdean, about 
three miles distant, a tessellated pavement was dis- 
covered about ten years ago, one part of which repre- 
sents the wrestling match between Hercules and 
Antaeus. 

ALRESFORD, OLD (ST. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of ALRESFORD, hundred of FAWLEY, Winchester 
and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON, ^ of 
a mile (N.) from New Alresford ; containing 502 in- 
habitants. This parish, which is divided from that of 
New Alresford, by the river Itchen, comprises about 
2000 acres ; the surface is hilly, and the soil light and 
chalky, but tolerably good. The hamlet of Hamsworth 
is included in the measurement of this parish, but is 
rated with that of Medsted. The living is a rectory, 
with those of New Alresford and Medsted annexed, 
valued in the king's books at 49- 12. 8|. ; the glebe 
comprises 40 acres ; patron, the Bishop of Winchester. 
Schools are supported by subscription. 

ALREWAS (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
LICHFIELD, N. division of the hundred of OFFLOW 
and of the county of STAFFORD, 5| miles (N. E. by N.) 
from Lichfield ; containing, with the hamlets of Fradley 
and Orgreave 1658 inhabitants, of whom 1173 are in 
the township of Alrewas. This parish is bounded by 
the Trent on the north, and by the Tame on the east, 
and contains 4329a. 31p. ; it is intersected by the Trent 
and Mersey, and the Coventry canals ; and there is a 
station of the Birmingham and Derby railroad 1^ mile 
from the village. A manufactory of worsted yarn em- 
ploys about ninety hands. Courts leet and baron for 
the manor are held twice a year : the custom of 
Borough English prevails. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 5. 6. 8. ; patron 
and impropriator, Prebendary of Alrewas and Weeford, 
in the Cathedral of Lichfield. The prebendal tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 439. 15., 
and the vicarial for 250 ; there is glebe-land and land 
allotted in lieu of tithes upon the common ; the pre- 
bendary has 102a. 25p., and the vicar Bfa. 2r. 10p,, 



ALST 



A L S T 



with a glebe-house. The church is chiefly in the Nor- 
man style, and contains monuments to several of the 
family of Turton, a member of which was chief justice 
of the king's bench, in the time of William III. There 
are places of worship for Wesleyans and Ranters 5 and a 
national school. Viscount Anson was baron of Or- 
greave, in the parish, where he had an estate, which still 
remains in the possession of the family. The Roman 
Ikeneld- street intersects the parish. 

ALREWAS-HAYES, an extra-parochial liberty, 
locally in the parish of ALREWAS, N. division of the 
hundred of OFFLOW and of the county of STAFFORD, 
5| miles (N. N. E.) from Lichfield ; containing 92 in- 
habitants, and comprising 1200 acres. 

ALSAGER, a chapelry, in the parish of BARTHOM- 
LEY, union of CONGLETON, hundred of NANTWICH, S. 
division of the county of CHESTER, 4 miles (W.) from 
Church Lawton ; containing 445 inhabitants. This place 
is situated on the road from Barthomley to Lawton, and 
comprises 20/6 acres. The living is a donative, in the 
patronage of the ladies of the manor ; the income is 
105, arising from 63 acres of land. A rent-charge of 
240 has been awarded as a commutation in lieu of the 
tithes. The chapel is a handsome edifice consecrated in 
1790, and contains a monument to the memory of Col. 
Tryon, who was engaged in the Peninsular war. There is 
a place of worship for Wesleyans ; also a small school 
founded and endowed, in 1789, by Mary, Judith, and 
Margaret Alsager, owners of the manor, who likewise 
built and endowed the chapel. 

ALSOP-LE-DALE, with EATON, a chapelry, in the 
parish of ASHBOURN, hundred of WIRKSWORTH, S. 
division of the county of DERBY, 5^ miles (N. by W.) 
from Ashbourn j containing 67 inhabitants. The living 
is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the inhabit- 
ant freeholders ; net income, 49 ; appropriator, Dean of 
Lincoln. The chapel, dedicated to St. Michael, is of 
Norman architecture, with many modern alterations. 

ALSTON, or ALSTON-MOOR (ST. AUGUSTINE), a 
market-town and parish, forming a union of itself, in 
LEATH ward, E. division of CUMBERLAND, 29 miles 
(E. S. E.) from Carlisle, and 287 (N. N.W.) from Lon- 
don ; comprising the township of Alston, and the 
chapelry of Garrigill, the former containing 4588, and 
the latter 1474, inhabitants. Mining in this district is 
of some antiquity, several charters having been granted 
to the miners of " Alderston " in the 13th century: in 
1282 the manor was granted by Edward I. to Nicholas 
de Veteripont, and in 1333 Edward III. confirmed to 
his son, Robert de Veteripont, and to the monetarii, or 
coiners, many important privileges : in the reign of 
Henry V. the manor and mines were let to William 
Stapleton ; and, subsequently, Alston became the pro- 
perty of the Hyltons of Hylton Castle, in the county of 
Durham, and lastly of the Radcliffe family, with whom 
it continued until the attainder of the last Earl of Der- 
wentwater, in 1716, when it was granted by the crown 
to the Governors of Greenwich Hospital, The parish 
comprises by computation about 40,000 acres, and in- 
cludes two considerable villages, Garrigill and Nent 
Head, the latter on the eastern border of the parish ; 
each 4 miles from Alston, and each, containing about 
500 persons. The town of Alston, consisting of 1650 
inhabitants, is situated on the declivity and base of 
Middlefell hill, in a narrow valley, near the confluence of 
46 



the rivers Nent and South Tyne, over each of which is 
a neat stone bridge. The houses, which are irregularly 
and rather meanly built, are chiefly of stone, roofed with 
slate, and the streets are inconveniently steep ; the 
inhabitants are supplied with water conveyed by pipes 
from an excellent spring, about half a mile distant, into 
four punts, or cisterns, conveniently placed in different 
parts of the town. A subscription library was estab- 
lished in 1821, in commemoration of the coronation of 
George IV. ; and races are held on Easter Monday and 
Tuesday. An excellent new line of road has been made, 
under the superintendence of Mr. M'Adam, from Hex- 
ham to Penrith, through Alston, which is shorter by 
several miles than the old road by way of Carlisle. 
Several of the contiguous eminences command beautiful 
views of the surrounding country, particularly Hartside, 
which embraces the counties of Cumberland and West- 
morland, including the lake of Ullswater, and the 
mountains of the lake district, Solway Firth, and the 
adjacent Scottish shore. 

The immediate vicinity, which is inclosed on the west 
by the mountains Cross Fell and Hartside, and on all 
sides by high lands, is equally remarkable for the ste- 
rility of the soil and the abundance of its MINERAL 
wealth. The lead-mines, in which the inhabitants are 
chiefly employed, and of which there are no fewer than, 
thirty-eight in the parish, are very extensive and pro- 
ductive : the ore contains a proportion of silver, averag- 
ing from eight to ten ounces per ton ; and one of the 
mines opened at Yadmoss in 1828, has produced ore 
containing ninety-six ounces of silver in each ton. 
Copper has also been found in the same vein with the 
lead, and in many instances the same mine has been 
worked for copper-ore of excellent quality, and lead-ore 
rich in silver. The grand aqueduct level, called "Nent 
Force," was cut by the trustees of Greenwich Hospital : 
this subterraneous canal is five miles in length, from 
its mouth, near the town, to the shaft of the mine, and 
boats and guides were once kept in readiness to con- 
duct those who might wish to explore it. In the mines 
are several extensive caverns, splendidly decorated with 
fluor-spar, shot into crystals of every form and hue j 
and, where the yellow copper-ore and pyrites are inter- 
mingled, nothing can exceed the brilliancy with which 
the prismatic colours are reflected. Of these, Tutman's 
Hole has been explored to the distance of a mile from 
the entrance ; and in that at Dun Fell, on the side of 
Alston-Moor, the chambers and windings are so intri- 
cate, that visiters have been glad to avail themselves of 
some clue to their return. Among other minerals found 
here are, pyrites of iron, containing small particles of 
gold, tessellated ore, zinc, phosphate and sulphate of 
lead, cobalt, &c. The crow coal, found on the moor, 
at a small depth below the surface, contains pyrites 
in large proportion ; it burns with little flame, but 
emits an intense heat, and, mixed with clay, is made 
into balls for fuel. There are two large smelting-fur- 
naces, and several machines, worked by water, for 
crushing and washing the ore. The principal manufac- 
ture is that of woollen yarn, carried on in an exten- 
sive mill recently built ; and there is also a public 
brewery on a large scale. The market is on Satur- 
day ; fairs take place on the last Thursday in May, 
Friday before the last day of Sept., and the first Thurs- 
day in Nov. At Nent Head, a customary market is 



A LST 



ALTH 



also held every Thursday. Two of the county magis- 
trates hold a petty-session at the Swan inn, on the first 
Friday in every month ; and courts leet and baron 
occur in the months next after Easter and Michaelmas. 
The LIVING is a discharged vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 7. 13.; net income, 180; patrons 
and impropriators, Governors of Greenwich Hospital. 
The tithes, with certain exceptions, were committed for 
an allotment of land, under an inclosure act, in 1803. 
The church, rebuilt in 1770, is a neat edifice with a 
tower. A chapel of ease is situated at Garrigill, a plain 
and unadorned building erected by subscription about 
1780 ; and there are places of worship for the Society 
of Friends, Independents, and Primitive and Wesleyan 
Methodists. The grammar school was -rebuilt by sub- 
scription, in 1828, and is endowed with 29. 8. 6. per 
annum : no scholars are gratuitously instructed, but 
the master, in consideration of the endowment, is 
limited to a certain scale of charges for boys attending 
it. There are also various other schools in different 
parts of the parish, some of which have small endow- 
ments. The Roman road called the Maiden-way crosses 
the western part of the parish, where it may be dis- 
tinctly traced ; and on Hall hill, a little below the 
bridge over the Tyne, are the foundations of an ancient 
fortress, surrounded by a moat. On Gildersdale fell is 
a stagnant pool, covered with mud several inches thick, 
which is used by the neighbouring people as paint ; it 
produces colours resembling yellow ochre and Spanish 
brown, but has not been analyzed. 

ALSTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Ashburton, 
union of NEWTON ABBOT, hundred of TEIGNBRIDGE, 
Teignbridge and S. divisions of DEVON, 1\ miles (N. E. 
by E.) from Ashburton. It comprises 1010 acres by 
computation ; the surface is hilly, and the sub-soil 
consists of limestone, clay, and sharp gravel. The 
chief produce arises from corn land and orchards, the 
cultivators of which are in general independent free- 
holders. 

ALSTON, a township, in the parish of RIBCHES- 
TER, union of PRESTON, hundred of AMOUNDERNESS, 
N. division of the county of LANCASTER, 6^ miles 
(N. E.) from Preston ; containing 807 inhabitants. The 
tithes have been commuted for rent-charges amounting 
to 170, of which 150 are payable to the Bishop of 
Chester, and 20 to the vicar. There is a place of wor- 
ship for Roman Catholics. 

ALSTONE, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of 
CHELTENHAM, union of WINCHCOMB, E. division of 
the county of GLOUCESTER, f of a mile (N. W. by W.) 
from Cheltenham. This place is situated on the river 
Chelt, over which is a viaduct for the Birmingham and 
Gloucester railway, which proceeds hence to the parish 
of Swinton. A church was consecrated in 1840, and 
is a handsome and spacious structure, containing 2085 
sittings, 480 of which are free. Here is a chalybeate 
saline spa, for an account of which see CHELTENHAM. 

ALSTONE, a chapelry, in the parish of OVERBURY, 
Middle division of the hundred of OSWALDSLOW, Per- 
shore and E. divisions of the county of WORCESTER, 
6^ miles (E. by S.) from Tewkesbury ; containing 89 
inhabitants. It forms part of a detached portion of the 
parish, surrounded on all sides, except the north-west 
by the county of Gloucester. The chapel is dedicated to 
St. Margaret. 
47 



ALSTONFIELD (Sr. PETER), a parish, in the union 
of LEEK, hundred of NORTH TOTMONSLOW, N. division 
of the county of STAFFORD, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from 
Ashbourn ; comprising the chapelries of Elkstone, 
Warslow, Longnor, and Quarnford, and the townships 
of Alstonfield, Fairfieldhead, Heathy-Lee, and Hollins- 
clough ; and containing 4701 inhabitants, of whom 654 
are in the township of Alstonfield. This parish, which 
is fifteen miles in length, is situated at the northern 
extremity of the county, and is bounded on the west by 
Cheshire, and on the east by Derbyshire, from which it 
is separated by the river Dove : the township comprises 
2862 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 8. 11. 4.; net income, 112; 
patron and impropriator, Sir George Crewe, Bart. The 
church is in the early English style, with an embattled 
tower crowned with pinnacles ; the nave is separated 
from the aisles by a series of finely pointed arches ; the 
pulpit and reading-desk were the gift of the poet Cotton, 
who resided at Beresford Hall. There are six chapels 
exclusively of the parish church, those in Heathy Lee 
and Hollinsclough having been lately built, principally 
at the expense of Sir G. Crewe. A small free school 
was founded in 1726, by German Pole, who bequeathed 
60 for its endowment. 

ALTCAR (Sr. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union of 
ORMSKIRK, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of 
the county of LANCASTER, 6 miles (W. by S.) from 
Ormskirk ; containing 490 inhabitants. It consists of 
about 3300 acres ; the surface is in general flat, and the 
soil light, and in some parts mossy ; a considerable por- 
tion is laid out in meadows, from which a large quantity 
of hay, of somewhat inferior quality, is produced. The 
lands are subject to floods in the winter, which are 
carried off by the small river Alt. The living is a per- 
petual curacy ; net income, 95 ; patron and impropri- 
ator, Earl of Sefton. 

ALTERNON (S T . NUNN), a parish, in the union of 
LAUNCESTON, hundred of LESNEWTH, E. division of 
CORNWALL, 7 miles (W. S. W.) from Launceston ; con- 
taining 1334 inhabitants. Fairs are held at Five-Lanes, 
in the parish, on the Monday after June 24th, and the 
first Tuesday in November. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 18. 5. ; net income, 
320 ; patrons and appropriators, Dean and Chapter of 
Exeter. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans ; 
also a school supported by subscription. 

ALTHAM, a chapelry, in the parish of WHALLEY, 
union of BURNLEY, Higher division of the hundred of 
BLACKBURN, N. division of the county of LANCASTER, 
5 miles (W.) from Burnley ; containing 349 inhabitants. 
Coal is obtained in the vicinity. The living is a perpe* 
tual curacy; net income, 117 ; patron, R. T. W. Wal- 
ton, Esq. The chapel is dedicated to St. James. 

ALTHORNE (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of MALDON, hundred of DENGIE, S. division of ESSEX, 
4 miles (N. W.) from Burnham ; containing 418 inhabit- 
ants. It is situated on the estuary of the river Crouch, 
from the overflowing of which the lowlands are pro- 
tected by very strong embankments, nine feet high, 
constructed by labourers from Holland, whose descend- 
ants are still resident here. The living is a vicarage, 
united to the rectory of Creeksea in 1811, and valued in 
the king's books at 14 ; impropriator, Thomas Wilson, 
Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for a rent- 



ALTO 



ALTO 



charge of 454. 5. 6., the small tithes for a rent-charge 
of 155. 15. ; and there are more than six acres of 
glebe. The church is a small edifice, containing, in the 
aisles, two brass plates, with inscriptions in the old 
English character, one to the memory of Margaret 
Hycklot, the other to William Hycklot, " who paid for 
the workmanship of the walls of this church," and died 
in 1508. 

ALTHORP (Sr. OSWALD), a parish, in the union of 
THORNE, W. division of the wapentake of MANLEY, 
parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 11 miles (W. by 
N.) from Glandford-Bridge ; containing, with the town- 
ships of Amcotts and Keadby, 1184 inhabitants. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 25, 
and in the patronage of the Crown ; net income, 400. 
The -tithes of the township of Althorp have been com- 
muted for corn-rents under an act obtained in 1794. 
There is a chapel of ease at Amcotts. 

ALTHORPE, an extra-parochial liberty, in the hun- 
dred of NEWBOTTLE-GROVE, county of NORTHAMPTON j 
containing 55 inhabitants. See BRINGTON. 

ALTOFTS, a township, in the parish of NORMAN- 
TON, Lower division of the wapentake of AGBRIGG, W. 
riding of YORK, 3^ miles (N. E. by E.) from Wakefield ; 
containing 704 inhabitants. This place is situated on 
the south side of the river Calder, across which is a 
horse-ferry, and near the junction of the York and 
North-Midland railways. There is an aqueduct of ele- 
gant design for the Aire and Calder canal. The ancient 
hall of Altofts is said to have been the residence of 
Admiral Frobisher, by whom it was built. Stone of 
good quality is quarried, and many fossils are found. 
The impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 344, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge, 
and the vicarial for one of 69. 10. Here is a school, 
endowed with 20 per annum by Mrs. Susannah Dods- 
worth, for which 15 girls are clothed and instructed. 

ALTON (ST. LAWRENCE), a market-town and pa- 
rish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of ALTON, 
Alton and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON, 
17 miles (E. N. E.) from Winchester, and 47 (S. W. by 
W.) from London; containing 3139 inhabitants. The 
name of this town, which is a slight modification of 
Auleton or Aultone, is descriptive of its great antiquity. 
It was a royal demesne in the time of Alfred the Great, 
and is noticed in the Saxon Chronicle as the scene of a 
sanguinary battle which was fought between the Saxons 
and the piratical Danes, who, having landed on this 
part of the coast in 1001, plundered and laid waste the 
country till they reached this place, at that time called 
" Aethelinga-dene," where the men of Hampshire had 
assembled in order to oppose their further progress, but 
notwithstanding great numbers of the invaders were 
slain, they remained in possession of the field of battle, 
whence they afterwards marched northward. At the 
time of the Norman survey the town belonged to the 
abbot of St. Peter's, Winchester ; and in the reign of 
Edward I. it returned one member to parliament. 
During the civil war of the seventeenth century, the 
place was occupied by a detachment of the royal army, 
under the command of Sir Ralph Hopton ; but, in 1 643, 
it was taken by the parliamentarian forces under Sir 
William Waller, after an engagement in which Col. 
Bowles was killed at the church door, and his regiment 
taken prisoners. 
48 



The TOWN is situated at the source of the river Wey, 
and consists of three principal streets, which are lighted 
under an act obtained for that purpose ; the houses are 
in general neatly built, and of pleasing and cheerful 
appearance. A public library, on a plan calculated to 
meet the wants of the working mechanics, was esta- 
blished in 1S37 ; it is in a state of prosperous advance- 
ment, and lectures are occasionally given to the mem- 
bers. The environs are beautifully picturesque, and the 
adjacent district richly fertile ; the lands are watered by 
a fine stream, which crosses the town under the streets 
and houses ; and in the surrounding scenery the church 
occupies a commanding site, and forms a conspicuous 
and interesting feature. The parish comprises by mea- 
surement 3896 acres ; the surface is generally hilly, and 
the soil consists principally of chalk and gravel. The 
manufacture of bombazines was formerly carried on to 
a very considerable extent, but is now totally discon- 
tinued ; a great quantity of hop bagging is made, and 
there is a large paper manufactory, which is set in 
motion by the Wey, at no great distance from its 
source. There are also two large breweries in the town, 
and in the vicinity are about 200 acres of ground laid 
out in the cultivation of hops, the malt and the ale of 
Alton being in high repute. The market, formerly held 
on Saturday, but since 1840 altered to Tuesday in every 
alternate week, is chiefly for cattle and sheep, and from 
the great agricultural resources of the neighbourhood is 
rapidly increasing : fairs for horses and cattle take place 
annually on the last Saturday in April, and Sept. 29th, 
the former for the manor of Alton Westbrook, and the 
latter for that of Alton Eastbrook. The county magis- 
trates hold petty-sessions here for the division ; and a 
court leet is held once a month by the steward of the 
manor, at which debts under 40*. are recoverable. The 
town-hall, situated in the market-place, was rebuilt by 
subscription in 1812, and was principally used for the 
national school ; but since the establishment of the new 
market, and of an agricultural society, it has, together 
with the market-place, been taken on lease by the inha- 
bitants for the use of the market, and the school has 
been removed. 

The LIVING is a vicarage, with those of Binstead, 
Holybourne, and Kingsley annexed, valued in the king's 
books at 15; patrons and appropriators, Dean and 
Chapter of Winchester, whose tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 770, and the vicarial for 
496. The church is a spacious structure, principally 
in the later style of English architecture, with some 
portions of earlier date ; it has a square embattled 
tower surmounted by a spire, and has been enlarged by 
the addition of a north aisle ; on its northern wall is a 
curious painting of our Saviour's life. There are places 
of worship for the Society of Friends, and for Inde- 
pendents. The free grammar school at Anstey, in the 
parish, was founded in the reign of Charles I., by John 
Eggar, and has an endowment of 74. 10. per annum ; 
and there is also a national school. The poor law union 
of Alton comprises 19 parishes or places, and contains a 
population of 11,299- Roman urns, coins, and other 
antiquities have been found in the neighbourhood ; and 
in cleaning the church, in 1 839 5 a portrait of Henry VI. 
and several bishops were discovered. William de Alton, 
a Dominican friar, who lived in the time of Edward II., 
and wrote a treatise on the universality of the pollution 



ALTR 



A L V A 



of mankind by original sin ; John Pitts, an eminent 
biographer, author of a work entitled " De Illustribus 
Angliap. Scriptoribits ;" and William Curtis, an eminent 
botanist, author of the " Flora Londinensis," editor of the 
Botanical Magazine, and founder of a botanical garden 
near the Magdalene Hospital, and afterwards of a more 
extensive establishment at Brompton, were natives of 
the town. 

ALTON, county of STAFFORD. See ALVETON. 
ALTON-BARNES, or BERNERS (ST. MARY), a 
parish, in the union of DEVIZES, hundred of SWAN- 
BOROUGH, Devizes and N. divisions of WILTS, 7 miles 
(E.) from Devizes ; containing 167 inhabitants. The 
new road from Amesbury to Kennet will pass through 
the parish, where it will cross the Kennet and Avon 
canal, which flows a little south of the village. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
6. 18. 11^., and in the gift of New College, Oxford : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
449, and the glebe consists of about 50 acres. A 
school is supported by the rector. 

ALTON-PANCRAS (Sr. PANCRATWS), a parish and 
liberty, in the union of CERNE, Cerne division of DOR- 
SET, 8^ miles (N.) from Dorchester ; containing 248 in- 
habitants. The two manors, or parcels of demesne 
land, called Alton Borealis and Alton Australis, consti- 
tute the endowment of two prebends in the cathedral of 
Salisbury. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 9 ; net income, 25 ; patrons, 
the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury (who are also appro - 
priators), on the nomination of the Prebendary. The 
church is dedicated to St. Pancratius, a nobleman of 
Phrygia, who suffered martyrdom under Diocletian at 
Rome in the third century. 

ALTON-PRIORS, a chapelry, in the parish of 
OVERTON, union of PEWSEY, hundred of ELSTUB and 
EVERLEY, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of 
WILTS, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Devizes ; containing, 
with the tything of Stowell, 251 inhabitants. The cha- 
pelry is separated on the north from the principal por- 
tion of the parish in which it is situated by a range of 
hills that stretches across the country in this part ; and 
the Kennet and Avon canal passes at a short distance 
on the south. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints. 

ALTRINCHAM, a mar- 
ket-town and chapelry, and 
the head of a union, in the 
parish of BOWDON, hun- 
dred of BUCKLOW, N. di- 
vision of the county of 
CHESTER, 7 miles (N. by 
E.) from Nether Knutsford, 
and 180 (N. W. by N.) from 
London ; containing 3399 
inhabitants. The town is 
situated near BowdonDowns, 
and, though small, contains 




Arms. 



several respectable dwelling-houses, the salubrity of the 
air rendering it a place of general resort for invalids 
from Manchester : it is watched and lighted under the 
general act of the llth of Geo. IV., and is characterized 
throughout by cleanliness and neatness. The trade 
principally consists in the spinning of yarn, the making 
of bobbins for cotton and worsted spinners, and the 
weaving of cotton by hand-looms, and by machinery 
VOL. I. 49 



driven by steam, for the manufacturers at Manchester 
and other adjacent towns. The Duke of Bridgewater's 
canal from Manchester to Runcorn passes within three- 
quarters of a mile from the town, and affords a facility 
of conveyance for coal. Early potatoes are cultivated 
here to a great extent for the Manchester market. The 
market-days are Tuesday and Saturday, the latter for 
butchers' meat ; the fairs, chiefly for the sale of live 
stock, are held on April 29th, August 5th, and Novem- 
ber 22nd Altrincham was made a free borough in the 
reign of Edward I., by charter of Hamon de Massey, 
lord of the barony of Dunham-Massey, whereby the 
burgesses were empowered to have a guild-merchant, 
and to choose a pr&positus, or bailiff ; but the only pri- 
vilege they now possess is that of electing a mayor at a 
court leet held in autumn, when a jury of burgesses 
present three of their own body to the steward, who 
appoints one to the office, which is merely nominal, and 
the duty of which extends only to the opening of the 
fairs. A steward is chosen by the lord of the barony of 
Dunham-Massey, and this officer appoints a bailiff; 
there are also two constables, who are chosen by the 
leet jury. The living is a perpetual curacy ; patron, 
Vicar of Bowdon ; net income, 187. The tithes have 
been commuted for rent-charges amounting to 91. 14., 
of which 48. 14. are payable to the Bishop of Chester, 
and 43 to the vicar. The chapel, dedicated to St. 
George, is a plain brick building, erected by subscription 
in 1799- There are two places of worship for Metho- 
dists, and one for Unitarians. The Jubilee school, built 
in 1810, has a small endowment, but is chiefly supported 
by subscription. The poor law union of Altrincham 
comprises 39 parishes or places, and contains a popula- 
tion of 31,019. 

ALVANLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of FRODS- 
HAM, union of RUNCORN, Second division of the hun- 
dred of EDDISBURY, S. division of the county of 
CHESTER, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from Frodsham ; contain- 
ing 314 inhabitants. The living is a donative; net 
income, 47 ; patron, Lord Alvanley. The chapel is 
dedicated to St. Mary. A national school has been 
established. Alvanley gives the title of Baron to the 
Arden family. 

ALVASTON, a township, in the parish, union, and 
hundred of NANTWICH, S. division of the county of 
CHESTER, 2^ miles (N. E.) from Nantwich ; containing 
40 inhabitants. Races are held annually in the town- 
ship. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 82. 7. 6. 

ALVASTON, a chapelry, in the parish of ST. MI- 
CHAEL, DERBY, union of SHARDLOW, hundred of MOR- 
LESTON and LITCHURCH, S. division of the county of 
DERBY, 3^ miles (S. E. by E.) from Derby 5 containing 
493 inhabitants. This place is pleasantly situated near 
the river Derwent, on the London road, and contains 
1354ct. 3r. 34p. The Derby canal runs through the 
parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of 
the parishioners, with a net income of 1 16 : the tithes 
were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1802; 
the glebe consists of about 67 acres, and portions of land 
have been purchased in Leicestershire and Derbyshire 
by an allowance from Queen Anne's Bounty. There is 
a place of worship for Wesleyans ; and two schools are 
aided by the trustees of Gilbert's charity, which pro- 
vides also for the renair of the church. 

H 



A L V E 



ALVECHURCH (ST. LAWRENCE), a parish, in the 
union of BROMSGROVE, forming a detached portion of 
the Middle division of the hundred of OSWALDSLOW, 
locally in the Upper division of the hundred of HALF- 
SHIRE, Northfield and E. divisions of the county of 
WORCESTER, \\ miles (E. N. E.) from Bromsgrove ; 
containing 1633 inhabitants. This was the occasional 
residence of the Bishops of Worcester, who had a palace 
here in the reign of Henry II., which after the sale of 
the manor by the parliament, in 1648, was suffered to 
fall to decay, and has now entirely disappeared. The 
parish comprises 6599 acres, and the Birmingham and 
Worcester canal runs through it. Fairs for cattle and 
sheep are held on the 22nd of April and the 10th of 
August. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 24. 16. 8. ; net income, 1025 ; patron, Bishop 
of Worcester. The church has Norman pillars, but the 
chancel displays the early English style, and the tower 
is more modern. Here is a charity with an income of 
36 per annum, appropriated to the education of chil- 
dren, and general purposes. An hospital for a master, 
six brethren, and two sisters, was incorporated by Queen 
Elizabeth, and is endowed with 33. 6. 8., exclusively 
of keeping the tenements in repair; and there are se- 
veral minor charities. The Roman Ikeneld-street passes 
through the parish, in its course from Alcester towards 
Lichfield. The learned Dr. Hickes, author of the 
" Thesaurus SejJtentrionalium Linguarum" was incum- 
bent of Alvechurch. 

ALVELEY (ST. MARY), a parish, partly within the 
liberty of the borough of BRIDGENORTH, but chiefly in 
the hundred of STOTTESDEN, union of BRIDGENORTH, 
S. division of SALOP, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Bridge- 
north ; containing, with Nordley Regis township, and 
Romsley liberty in the borough of Bridgenorth, 1062 
inhabitants. It comprises 6435 acres, including Roms- 
ley, which contributes one-third towards the church- 
rate, but is independent of the parish in other respects : 
the road from Shrewsbury to Cheltenham passes through 
it, and the river Severn is its boundary on one side. 
There are some works for the manufacture of iron, and 
several stone-quarries, of which the stone is used for 
building, and made into wheels for mills and manufac- 
tures. Alveley was one of the five prebends in the 
royal free chapel of the castle of Bridgenorth, valued, 
in the reign of Henry III., at sixty marks, and is still 
reputed and rated as such in the Office of the First 
Fruits. The living is a perpetual curacy, lately en- 
dowed with 300 by various persons, and with 17 per 
annum by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners ; net income 
previously, 82 ; patron and impropriator, Col. Gatacre. 
The church is a fine edifice, a mixture of Norman and 
English architecture, with middle, side, and transept 
aisles, and a curious old painted window, supposed to 
have been built in the time of the Tudors. There is a 
private chapel attached to Coton Hall in the parish. A 
free school was endowed in 16 16, by John Grove, who 
also founded almshouses for decayed labourers. 

ALVERDISCOT (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of TORRINGTON, hundred of HARTLAND, Braun- 
ton and N. divisions of DEVON, 4 miles (N. E.) from 
Torrington; containing 332 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is situated on the old road from Torrington to 
Barnstaple, comprises by computation 2000 acres. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
50 



13. 3. llj., and in the gift of William Lee, Esq. : the 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 156. 8., 
and the glebe comprises 36 acres. The church contains 
some elegant marble monuments to the families of 
Hoody and Welch, former proprietors of the manor : it 
has been recently repewed and beautified, and a small 
vestry-room has been added. There is a place of wor- 
ship for Wesleyans, and a school is supported by sub- 
scription. 

ALVERSTOKE (ST. MARY), a parish, comprising 
the sea-port town of Gosport, the watering-place called 
Anglesey, and the chapelry of Forton, in the liberty of 
ALVERSTOKE and GOSPORT, Fareham and S. divisions 
of the county of SOUTHAMPTON ; and containing 13,510 
inhabitants. This place is situated on the shore of 
Alverstoke bay. According to an ancient chronicle, 
Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester, and brother of 
King Stephen, on his return from Normandy, being 
overtaken by a storm in the bay, between the Isle of 
Wight and Alverstoke, made a solemn vow to build a 
church on the spot where he should first land in safety ; 
and, having landed at this place, is said to have erected 
the parish church, in fulfilment of his vow, about the 
year 1130. The parish is of considerable extent: the 
scenery is varied, and in the western part of the parish 
are several small rural villages which have a pleasing 
aspect, and contrast finely with the more stately edifices 
in other parts of it. The village of Alverstoke is plea- 
santly situated about half a mile from the bay, and 
within a quarter of a mile from the elegant new buildings 
of Anglesey. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 21. 6. 0., and in the gift of the Bishop 
of Winchester : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 1250, and the glebe consists of 45 acres. 
The church, which occupies a site in the village beauti- 
fully secluded by trees, has undergone many changes 
since its foundation, and is now in a state of renovation, 
which has been effected with a judicious regard to its 
original character, under the superintendence of the late 
incumbent. There are two chapels in the parish ; one 
at Gosport, consecrated in 1696, and dedicated to the 
Holy Trinity ; and one at Forton, in honour of St. 
John the Evangelist, an elegant edifice, containing 1200 
sittings, of which 700 are free, completed at an expense 
of 3775, by subscription, aided by a grant from the 
Parliamentary Commissioners, and consecrated in April 
1831. Attached to this chapel, of which the living is a 
perpetual curacy, with a net income of 114, in the 
patronage of the Rector, is a small plot of glebe ; and a 
district has been assigned to it, containing 2300 inha- 
bitants. It has an organ, which belonged to the cele- 
brated Handel, and was formerly in the Roman Catholic 
chapel at Winchester, but was purchased, some years 
ago, by the Rev. H. A. Veck. There are two national 
schools, and one for the children of Roman Catholics. 

ALVERTHORPE, a township, comprising the ec- 
clesiastical districts of Alverthorpe and Thornes, in 
the parish and union of WAKEFIELD, Lower division of 
the wapentake of AGBRIGG, W. riding of YORK, 1^ mile 
(W. N. W.) from Wakefield ; containing 5930 inhabit- 
ants. This township, including Westgate Common, a 
suburb of the borough of Wakefield, comprises by com- 
putation 3000 acres, chiefly the property of the Earl of 
Cardigan, who is lord of the manor of Alverthorpe. The 
land is rich and fertile, and in good cultivation ; the 



A L VE 



A L V E 



surface is varied, and the prevailing scenery pleasingly 
diversified 5 the substratum abounds with coal of good 
quality, and several mines are in operation. Alverthorpe 
Hall, the seat of Francis Maude, Esq., is a handsome 
residence, and throughout the township are numerous 
pleasing villas, of which the principal are Lupset Hall, 
the residence of Daniel Gaskell, Esq., and Homefield 
House, the seat of Thomas Foljambe, Esq. The village 
of Alverthorpe is pleasantly situated within a mile of 
Wakefield, and the township includes also the village of 
Thornes, and the hamlets of Fanshaw, Kirkham Gate, 
and Silcoates. The population is chiefly employed in 
the spinning of woollen and worsted yarn, and in the 
manufacture of woollen cloth and worsted stuffs, for 
which there are several mills and large factories ; the 
manufacture of rope and twine is also carried on to a 
considerable extent. The church, dedicated to St. Paul, 
was erected in 1826, at an expense of 8000, chiefly by 
grant of the Parliamentary Commissioners : it is a hand- 
some structure, in the early English style, with a square 
embattled tower crowned with pinnacles, and contains 
1600 sittings, of which 800 are free. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, at present in the gift of the Vicar of 
Wakefield ; the income, previously 72, was augmented 
in 1841 with 78 per annum by the Ecclesiastical Com- 
missioners, and a neat residence for the minister was 
built in 1842. The small tithes were commuted for 
land and a money payment, under an act of in closure, 
in 1793. A church has been also erected at Thornes, 
which is noticed in the article under that head ; and 
there is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school for 
girls is supported by Benjamin Gaskell, Esq., of Thornes, 
who also contributes to the support of an infant school, 
and pays 5 per annum for the instruction of nine 
children in the national school. The Northern Congre- 
gational school at Silcoates House was instituted in 
1830, for the board and education of the sons of minis- 
ters of the Independent denomination of dissenters ; and 
there are three Sunday schools in connexion with the 
Established Church. John Forster, Esq., bequeathed to 
the poor of the parish three cottages and some land, 
situated here, to which an addition was made at the 
inclosure, the whole producing 51 per annum, which 
is annually distributed at Christmas. 

ALVERTON, a hamlet, in the parish of KILVING- 
TON, union of NEWARK, S. division of the wapentake 
of NEWARK and of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 7 
miles (S. by W.) from Newark ; containing 26 inha- 
bitants. 

ALVESCOTT, a parish, in the union of WITNEY, 
hundred of BAMPTON, county of OXFORD, 6 miles (S. 
S. E.) from Burford ; comprising 202 la. 29/>., and con- 
taining 357 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 8. 16. 8.; net income, 371 ; 
patron, Rev. Thomas Neate. All the tithes were com- 
muted for land and corn-rents, under an inclosure act, 
in 1796. The church is an ancient structure, consisting 
of a nave with semi-transepts, a massive western tower, 
and a chancel, which has been rebuilt, and contains 
some mural monuments. Goddard Carter, Esq., in 
1723, left a rent-charge of 10, directing one-half to be 
applied in educating poor children, and the remainder 
in apprenticing them 

ALVESDISTON (S T . MARY), a parish, in the union 
of TISBURY, hundred of CHALK, Hindon and S. divi- 
51 



sions of WILTS, 7f miles (E. by N.) from Shaftesbury ; 
containing 263 inhabitants. This parish takes its name 
from Aileva, who held lands here at the time of the Nor- 
man survey : it contains about 2733 acres. The living is 
a discharged vicarage, with the rectory of Broad-Chalk 
consolidated, and united to the vicarage of Bower- 
Chalk ; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and 
Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. The church has 
a font of great antiquity, and in one of the aisles are 
four handsome mural monuments of marble to the me- 
mory of the Wyndham family. 

ALVESTON (ST. HELEN), a parish, in the union of 
THORNBURY, partly in the Lower, but chiefly in the 
Upper, division of the hundred of LANGLEY and SWINE- 
HEAD, W. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 
1 mile (S. by E.) from Thornbury ; containing 841 inha- 
bitants. This parish, which lies on the road from 
Bristol to Birmingham, comprises by computation 2600 
acres, including some waste lands, for the inclosure of 
which an act was passed in 1836 : the land is almost 
entirely pasture, and is thickly clothed with elm, beech, 
and oak. The scenery is grand, and the parish being 
situated on a high ridge, commands extensive views of 
the Severn and surrounding country. The living is a 
vicarage, annexed to that of Olveston : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 319, and the 
glebe comprises 25 acres. The church, situated at some 
distance from the village, is a small edifice in the later 
English style, with a low square embattled tower. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans, and a na- 
tional school was established in 1 835. There are some 
remains of a Roman encampment in a part of the parish 
called the Abbey. 

ALVESTON (Sx. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
STRATFORD-ON-AVON, Snitterfield division of the hun- 
dred of BARLICHWAY, W. division of the county of 
WARWICK, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Stratford ; contain- 
ing 793 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Avon, 
and contains by measurement 2700 acres. The living 
is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 6 ; net 
income, 220 ; patron, Rector of Hampton-Lucy ; im- 
propriator, George Lucy, Esq. The glebe consists of 90 
acres. The church was rebuilt in 1839, at an expense 
of about 2300, chiefly raised by subscription. A school 
is supported. 

ALVETON, or ALTON (ST. PETER), a parish, in the 
union of CHEADLE, S. division of the hundred of TOT- 
MONSLOW, N. division of the county of STAFFORD, 4^ 
miles (E. by S.) from Cheadle ; comprising the town- 
ships of Alton, Cotton, Denston, and Farley, and con- 
taining 2390 inhabitants, of whom 1168 are in Alton 
township. The extensive manor of Alton became the 
property of John Talbot, first Earl of Shrewsbury, by 
his marriage with the heiress of the Furnival family, and 
has remained with his descendants to the present time. 
The living, before the Reformation, was connected with 
the abbey of Croxden, to which the benefice was attached 
by Bertram de Verdon of Alton Castle, in 1176, after he 
founded the abbey. The ruins of the castle still remain, 
and are visible on the summit of a rock 300 feet above 
the bed of the Churnet : on the opposite bank of the 
river are the magnificent mansion and park of the Earl 
of Shrewsbury. The parish contains between 7000 and 
8000 acres : there are limestone quarries in the town- 
ship of Cotton, and some copper-mines at Ribden. The 

H2 



AL V I 



A M B E 



Uttoxeter branch of the Trent and Mersey canal runs 
through the parish, its course being for some miles 
parallel with that of the Churnet, over which it is car- 
ried by means of an aqueduct. The village is romantic- 
ally situated on the banks of the river, which here 
flows through a fertile vale ; on the summit of an adja- 
cent eminence is a lofty tower, commanding extensive 
and varied prospects. The living is a discharged vicar- 
age, valued in the king's books at 5. 16. 5^. ; net in- 
come, 151 ; patron, Earl of Shrewsbury, to whom and 
others the impropriation belongs : the glebe comprises 
5 acres. The church, which displays a mixture of the 
Norman and English styles, was repaired and enlarged 
in 1831. There is a chapel at Cotton. The Calvinistic 
and Wesleyan Methodists have places of worship ; and 
a Roman Catholic chapel and school have been recently 
erected at Alton-Towers by the Earl. Anthony Wall, 
in 1721, founded and endowed a school for twelve boys, 
of which the endowment is 11. 15. per annum; and 
there are also three other schools. At Bunbury, in the 
parish, are the remains of a very extensive fortress, of 
an irregular form, ascribed to Ceolred, King of Mercia, 
about 715 : it is defended on three sides by a double 
vallum, and on the fourth by a steep declivity. 

ALVINGHAM (ST. ADELWOLD), a parish, in the 
union of LOUTH, Marsh division of the hundred of 
LOUTH-ESKE, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 4 
miles (N. E.) from Louth ; containing 313 inhabitants. 
It comprises by computation 1600 acres, and is inter- 
sected by the Louth navigation. The living is a perpe- 
tual curacy, with that of Cockerington, St. Mary, an- 
nexed, in the patronage of the Bishop of Lincoln, who, 
as appropriator, owns about 400 acres of land, allotted 
in lieu of tithes at the inclosure in 1819, and from the 
produce of which the incumbent's stipend of 58 per 
annum is paid. The church was rebuilt in 1826, and is 
a neat and commodious building, situated in the same 
churchyard as that of Cockerington, St. Mary. A na- 
tional school has been just built. A priory of Gilbertine 
nuns and canons, dedicated to the Virgin Mary and St. 
Adelwold, was founded here in the reign of Henry II., 
which, at the dissolution, was valued at 141. 15. per 
annum. 

ALVINGTON, a parish, in the hundred of BLEDIS- 
LOE, W. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 65 
miles (N. E.) from Chepstow ; containing 340 inhabit- 
ants, and comprising by estimation 1550 acres. The 
abbot of Llantony, previously to the Reformation, ex- 
ercised capital jurisdiction in this manor, which subse- 
quently passed through various hands to the Highfords, 
of Dixton, from whose coheir it was purchased by the 
father-in-law of the present proprietor, who resides at 
Clanna House, in the parish. The road from Gloucester 
to Chepstow runs through Alvington, and the river 
Severn flows on the east. The living is consolidated 
with the rectory of Wollaston. 

ALVINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of BRIMPTON, 
union of YEOVIL, hundred of STONE, W. division of 
SOMERSET ; containing 65 inhabitants. 

ALVINGTON, WEST (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in 
the union of KTNGSBRIDGE, hundred of STANBOROUGH, 
Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of DEVON, 
1 mile (W. S. W.) from Kingsbridgej containing 998 
inhabitants. It comprises 8676 acres ; the surface is 
very hilly, and the soil chiefly arable, and a large quan- 
62 



tity of peculiarly fine cider is made. The living is a 
vicarage, with the perpetual curacies of South Huish, 
Malborough, and South Milton annexed, valued in the 
king's books at 62. 16. 10^. ; net income, 685 j 
patrons and appropriators, Dean and Chapter of Salis- 
bury. The glebe comprises 2 acres here, and 1^ in 
each of the parishes of Malborough and South Milton. 
The church contains some good screen- work iii carved 
oak, an ancient stone font, and a beautiful monument 
to some member of the Bastard family, whose ancient 
seat has been converted into a farm-house. 

ALWALTON (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of PETERBOROUGH, hundred of NORMANCROSS, county 
of HUNTINGDON, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Stilton ; con- 
taining 329 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the 
river Nene, which here separates the counties of Hunt- 
ingdon and Northampton, and on the great north road, 
near its intersection with the road from Lynn to North- 
ampton ; it comprises 910a. 3r. 38p., of which the soil 
is fertile, and the surface beautifully varied. On the 
banks of the Nene are found great blocks of grey fossil 
stone, susceptible of a very high polish. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 3. 5. 10., and in 
the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Peterborough : the 
tithes were commuted for 197 acres of land and a 
money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1805. The 
church exhibits in the body of the building a singular 
combination of Norman and early English architecture : 
it has been new roofed in appropriate style, and the 
chancel restored to its pristine elegance by the rector, 
who has also built a handsome parsoaage-house. There 
is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Dr. Timothy Neve, 
Archdeacon of Huntingdon, was buried here in 1757. 

ALWINGTON (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the 
union of BIDEFORD, hundred of SHEBBEAR, Great 
Torrington and N. divisions of DEVON, 4 miles (S. W. 
by W.) from Bideford; containing, with the hamlets of 
Fairy Cross, Ford, and Woodtown, 392 inhabitants, and 
comprising by measurement 2603 acres. The living is 
a rectory, valued in the king's books at 17- 4. 9^., and 
in the gift of the Rev. I. T. Pine Coffin : the tithes have 
been commuted fora rent-charge of 241, and there 
are 60 acres of glebe. In the church, over the door of 
the chancel, is a curious ancient monument to a member 
of the Coffin family. In Yeo Vale, so called from the 
river Yeo, which runs through it, are the remains of a 
chapel. There is a parochial school ; also a place of 
worship for Wesleyans ; and almshouses for three poor 
persons, endowed in 1696 by R. Coffin, Esq. 

ALWOODLEY, a township, in the parish of HARE- 
WOOD, Upper division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, 
W, riding of YORK, 5| miles (N.) from Leeds ; contain- 
ing 281 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1250 
acres, chiefly the property of G. L. Fox, Esq. ; the an- 
cient hall, formerly the seat of Sir Gervase Clifton, who 
died in 1666, is now a farm-house. The soil is fertile, 
and the lands are generally in good cultivation ; the 
surface is undulated, and the surrounding scenery richly 
diversified. The township consists principally of irregu- 
larly built and widely detached houses. 

AMASTON, with ROWTON, a township, in the pa- 
rish of ALBERBURY, union of ATCHAM, hundred of 
FORD, S. division of SALOP. 

AMBERLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of MARDEN, 
hundred of BROXASH, union and county of HEREFORD, 



A M BL 



A MB R 



5f miles (N. N. E.) from Hereford ; containing 32 inha- 
bitants, and comprising 378 acres. 

AMBERLEY, a parish, in the hundred of WEST 
EASWIUTH, rape of ARUNDEL, W. division of SUSSEX, 
5 miles (N. N. E.) from Arundel j containing, with 
Rackham hamlet, 722 inhabitants. The bishops of 
Chichester had a residence here, erected at the close of 
the fourteenth century by Bishop Rede, and which is 
said to have been plundered and dismantled in the par- 
liamentary war by the army under Waller : the gateway 
is perfect, and, with other remains, has a bold and strik- 
ing appearance in the views of the surrounding district. 
The parish comprises by measurement 2878 acres, and 
is bounded on the west by the river Arun : the village 

* O 

occupies an elevated situation on a sandstone rock, and 
towards the south rises a range of steep downs, above 
which is a large knoll called Amberley Mount. The liv- 
ing is a vicarage, with that of Houghton united, valued 
in the king's books at 7. 5. 7|. ; net income, 166 ; 
patron and appropriator, Bishop of Chichester. The 
tithes were commuted in 1813 for 117 acres of land in 
this parish, and 16 in that of Angmering. The church 
has a nave of Norman, and a chancel of early English, 
architecture, separated by a Norman arch much en- 
riched. 

AMBERSHAM, NORTH, a tything, in the parish of 
STEEP, union of MIDHURST, hundred of EAST MEON, 
Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMP- 
TON, though locally in the hundred of EASEBOURNE, 
rape of CHICHESTER, county of SUSSEX, 2^ miles (E. N. 
E.) from Midhurst ; containing 133 inhabitants. 

AMBERSHAM, SOUTH, a tything, in the parish 
of STEEP, union of MIDHURST, hundred of EAST MEON, 
Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of SOUTH- 
AMPTON, though locally in the hundred of EASEBOURNE, 
rape of CHICHESTER, county of SUSSEX, 2^ miles (E. by 
N.) from Midhurst ; containing 189 inhabitants. 

AMBLE, a township, in the parish of WARKWORTH, 
union of ALNWICK, E. division of COQUETDALE ward, 
N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND^ 9 miles (S. E.) from 
Alnwick y containing 724 inhabitants. The village is 
pleasantly situated on an eminence near the mouth of 
the river Coquet, where a harbour has been formed 
under an act obtained in 1838, by which the value both 
of the soil and the minerals here has been greatly en- 
hanced. The place was anciently of much greater im- 
portance, as is evident from the discovery of circular 
foundations of houses, of unhewn and uncemented stones 
of British origin, and of Roman coins : a paved cause- 
way was also discovered, a few years since, extending in 
a direction towards the old bed of the Coquet. There 
are valuable and extensive mines of coal in the town- 
ship, the produce of which is exported to France and 
other parts. Through the indefatigable exertions of 
Thomas Browne, Esq., of Amble House, the Trinity 
Board have been induced to build a light-house on 
Coquet Island, about two miles from the shore, at a cost 
of 14,000 : it is of very great service, and is kept by a 
brother of Grace Darling. The tithes have been com- 
muted for rent-charges, amounting to 211. 8. 4., of 
which 170. 19. 6. are payable to the Bishop of Carlisle, 
and 46. 8. 10. to the vicar of the parish. On Coquet 
Island was a monastery, subordinate to Tynemouth 
priory, near the ruins of which several human bones 
were found some time since. 
53 



AMBLECOAT, a hamlet, in the parish of OLD 
SWINFORD, union of STOURBRIDGE, S. division of the 
hundred of SEISDON and of the county of STAFFORD> 
\ mile (N.) from Stourbridge j containing 1623 inhabit- 
ants. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 220. A school, in which are about 150 boys and 
85 girls, is supported by subscription. 

AMBLESIDE, a market-town and parochial chapelry, 
partly in the parish of WINDERMERE, but chiefly in 
that of GRASMERE, KENDAL ward and union, county 
of WESTMORLAND, 25 miles (W. S. W.) from Appleby, 
and 274 (N. W. by N.) from London ; containing 1281 
inhabitants. The name, anciently written Hamelside, is 
probably derived from the Saxon Hamol, signifying a 
sheltered habitation. The town is situated near the site 
of a Roman station of considerable extent, supposed by 
Horsley to have been the Dictis of the Notitia :- the 
earth- works of the fortress remain, and various Roman 
relics and foundations of buildings have been discovered. 
It stands on the acclivity of a steep eminence, near the 
northern extremity of the lake Windermere, in a district 
pre-eminently distinguished for the beauty of its scenery, 
and consists chiefly of one street, lighted with oil, but 
not paved : the houses, though detached and irregular> 
are well built. Tourists frequently make this their head- 
quarters, as many delightful excursions may be taken 
hence, to view the sublimely romantic and richly varied 
scenery of the lake district. There are a few manu- 
factories for linsey-woolsey ; and a peculiar kind of mar- 
ble, of a dusky green colour, veined with white, is found 
in the vicinity. The market,, granted in 1650 to the 
celebrated Countess of Pembroke, is on Wednesday j 
and fairs are held on Whit- Wednesday and the 13th 
and 29th of Oct., to which a court of pie-poudre is at- 
tached : the market-house was built about the year 
1796, on the site of Jhe former. The inhabitants re- 
ceived a charter in the reign of Charles II., under the 
authority of which they elect a mayor annually on 
Christmas-eve ; but he does not possess magisterial 
authority, the town being entirely within the jurisdic- 
tion of the county justices, who hold a petty-session 
monthly. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net 
income of 80 ; it is in the patronage of Lady Fleming, 
and the impropriation belongs to Sir R. Fleming,. Bart. 
A rent-charge of 27, of which 14 are payable by 
Ambleside below Stock, and 13 by Atnbleside above 
Stock, has been awarded to the rector of Windermere, 
as a commutation in lieu of tithes. The chapel, situ- 
ated in that part of the town which is in the parish of 
Grasmere, was made parochial by the Bishop of Chester 
in 1675, and was rebuilt in 1812. The free grammar 
school was founded and endowed by John Kelsick, in 
1721 j the annual income is about 127. At the upper 
extremity of the town is a beautiful waterfall called 
Stockgill Force. Bernard Gilpin, surnamed "The 
Northern Apostle," was born at Kentmere, and Judge 
Wilson at Troutbeck, near the town. 

AMBROSDEN (ST. MJRY), a parish, in the union 
of BICESTER, hundred of BULLINGTON, county of OX- 
FORD, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Bicester j comprising 
the chapelries of Arncott and Blackthorn, and contain- 
ing 892 inhabitants, of whom 181 are in the hamlet of 
Ambrosden. This place is supposed by Bishop Kennet, 
who was formerly incumbent of the parish, to have 
derived its name from Ambrosius Aurelius, the cele- 



AM E R 

brated British chief, who encamped here during the 
siege of Alchester by the Saxons. The living is a dis- 
charged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 11. !?; 
net income, 228 ; patron, Sir G. O. P. Turner, Bart. ; 
appropriator, Bishop of Oxford. The tithes were com- 
muted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1814. The 
church is stated to have been built in the latter part of 
the reign of Edward I., on the site of the original Saxon, 
or Norman, edifice, the northern entrance to which still 
remains ; it is in the early English style, with an em- 
battled tower, on the east and west fronts of which are 
some curious devices in plaster, and among the rest one 
of the paschal lamb. 

AMCOTTS, a chapelry, in the parish of ALTHORP, 
union of THORNE, W. division of the wapentake of 
MANLEY, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 1 if 
miles (E. S. E.) from Glandford-Bridge ; containing 417 
inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Thomas a 
Becket. The tithes were partially commuted for land, 
under an inclosure act, in 1779 ; and the impropriate 
tithes have been recently commuted for a rent-charge 
of 5. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 

AMERSHAM, or AGMONDESHAM (ST. MARY), a 
market-town and parish, and the head of a union, 
partly in the hundred of BURNHAM, county of BUCK- 
INGHAM, and partly in the hundred of DACORUM, in a 
detached portion of the county of HERTFORD, 33 miles 
(S. E. by S.) from Buckingham, and 25f (W. N. W.) from 
London ; containing 3645 inhabitants. The town is 
situated in a pleasant valley, through which flows the 
Misburne, a stream falling into the Colne near Ux- 
bridge : it is surrounded by wood-crowned hills, and 
consists principally of one street, well paved : there is a 
plentiful supply of water. In the reign of Henry V. 
several of the inhabitants were burnt at the stake for 
professing the tenets of the Lollards ; and in that of 
Mary, many of them suffered a similar fate : a spot of 
ground, occupying a circle of about 24 feet, is pointed 
out on the east side of the town as the place on which 
they suffered, and on which, it was supposed, no vege- 
tation could be matured ; but, in 1842, the ground was 
opened by means of a subscription fund, and found 
to contain nothing but flints, which served as a sort of 
drainage, and impeded culture. A manufactory for silk 
crape has been for some time established, and many 
females are employed in the making of lace and straw- 
plat j wooden chairs are also made for exportation. 
The market is on Tuesday ; and fairs are held on Whit- 
Monday and Sept. 19th. The town was a borough by 
prescription, and sent burgesses to parliament from the 
28th of Edward I. to the 2nd of Edward II., but made no 
subsequent return until the 21st of James I., from which 
time it continued to send two members till it was dis- 
franchised by the act of the 2nd of William IV. cap. 45. 
A constable and other officers are appointed at the 
court leet of the lord of the manor. The town-hall, 
situated in the centre of the town, is a handsome brick 
edifice resting on piazzas, erected by Sir Wm. Drake : 
the lower part is appropriated to the market ; the upper, 
which is surmounted by a lantern turret, is used for 
transacting public business. 

The parish contains by measurement 7855 acres of 

land, in general hilly, and resting upon a sub-soil of 

chalk, flint, and clay : the hamlet of Coleshill, locally 

in the county of Hertford, is connected with it. The 

54 



AMES 

living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
48. 16. 1|., and in the gift of Thos. Tyrwhitt Drake, 
Esq. : the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 1500, and there are about 123 acres of glebe. The 
church is a spacious edifice of brick coated with stucco ; 
the chancel and an adjoining mausoleum contain several 
interesting monuments, exhibiting some beautiful speci- 
mens of ancient and modern sculpture, some of which 
are by the hand of Bacon. There are two places of 
worship for Baptists, and one for the Society of Friends. 
The free grammar school was instituted by Dr. Robert 
Chaloner, canon of Windsor, who, by his will dated 
June 20th, 1620, endowed it with 20 per annum, since 
augmented to more than 80 ; and in an apartment 
adjoining the grammar schoolroom is a writing-school, 
established in 1699, by Lord Cheyne, and endowed with 
a rent-charge of 20, free for the instruction in writ- 
ing and arithmetic of boys from the parishes of Amer- 
sham and Chesham-Bois, who pay for learning to read. 
An almshouse for six aged widows was founded by Sir 
Wm. Drake, Bart., and endowed by him in 1667 : the 
income, arising from land and property in the funds, 
was augmented with a bequest of 300 by Wm. Drake, 
jun., in 1796, and now amounts to about 150. A fund 
of 87 per annum, arising from land and property in 
the three per cents., is applied, under the will of William 
Tothill, of Shardeloes, in apprenticing children, with 
sums of 15 or 20 each ; and there are divers sums 
for distribution among the poor. The union of Amer- 
sham comprises 9 parishes or places in the county of 
Berks, and 1 in that of Herts, and contains a popula- 
tion of 18,207: the workhouse is a good building in 
the Elizabethan style of architecture, erected at a cost 
of nearly 7000; it stands on the road leading to 
Wycombe, and will accommodate 350 paupers. 

AMERTON, a township, in the parish and union of 
STOWE, S. division of the hundred of PIREHILL, N. 
division of STAFFORDSHIRE ; containing 120 inhabit- 
ants. 

AMESBURY (Sx. MARY AND ST. MELORWS), a 
town and parish, and the head of a union, in the hun- 
dred of AMESBURY, S. division of WILTS, 7 miles (N.) 
from Salisbury, and 78 (W. S. W.) from London ; con- 
taining 1171 inhabitants. This place was anciently 
called Ambresbury, and that name is probably derived, 
not from Aurelius Ambrosius, as hitherto generally 
supposed, but from the combined appellations of Stone- 
henge and an ancient camp, both situate in the parish 
and near the town ; viz. Ambres, holy or anointed stones, 
and burg, or bury, a camp ; the holy stones near the 
camp. A monastery for 300 monks is stated to have 
been founded here by Ambruis, a British monk, or, 
more probably, by Ambrosius, which was destroyed by 
Gurthurm, or Gurmundus, a Saxon chief. After the 
conversion of the Saxons to Christianity, a synod was 
held at Amesbury, in the reign of King Edgar, to adjust 
the differences that existed between the regular and the 
secular clergy, which had been previously discussed in 
an assembly held at Calne. About 980, Elfrida, widow 
of the same king, founded here a nunnery of the Bene- 
dictine order, which she dedicated to St. Mary and St. 
Melorius, a Cornish saint, in expiation, it is supposed, 
of the murder of Edward, her step-son, at Corfe Castle. 
In 1177, the abbess and nuns were expelled, on the 
ground of incontinence ; and Henry II. made it a cell to 



A M OT 



A MP N 



the foreign abbey of Fontevrault. Queen Eleanor, widow 
of Henry III., assumed the veil in this convent, where 
she died in 129 1. It was at length made denizen ; and 
at the dissolution its revenue was valued at 558. 10. 2. 
The manor and principal estates of Amesbury origi- 
nally appertained to the abbey, and at the Reformation 
were granted to the Lord Protector Somerset, and were 
carried by the marriage of a female descendant into the 
family of Bruce, subsequently Earls of Amesbury ; they 
afterwards passed by sale to Lord Carlton, who left 
them by will to the Duke of Queensbury, husband to 
the celebrated duchess ; and on the death of the last 
duke, they descended by entail to the late Lord Douglas 
of Bothwell Castle, by whom they were sold to Sir 
Edmund Antrobus, at whose decease they passed to his 
nephew, the present baronet. A mansion was built by 
the Somerset family nearly on the site of the ancient 
abbey ; it has nearly been taken down by Sir Edmund 
Antrobus, who is replacing it by an extensive and ele- 
gant edifice, judiciously preserving the magnificent saloon 
of the former building. The town is situated in a valley 
on the banks of the Avon, and consists of two streets j 
it is neither paved nor lighted, but is well supplied with 
water. The market, which .was on Friday, has been 
discontinued : fairs are held on May 17th, June 21st, 
and December 21st. 

The parish comprises 5600 acres ; the surface is un- 
dulated, and the soil a gravelly loam upon a chalky sub- 
soil. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of 
the Dean and Canons of Windsor, with a net income of 
141 : about 5 acres of land in the parish of Hunger- 
ford, purchased by Queen Anne's Bounty, belong to it. 
The church, originally of Norman architecture, has 
recently undergone thorough repair ; it is warmed by 
two very handsome stoves, which cost 189, and were 
presented by Sir Edmund Antrobus. There is a place 
of worship for Wesleyans. In 1677, John Rose be- 
queathed property for the establishment of a superior 
and a secondary school, the former for boys, and the latter 
for boys and girls : the endowment consists of a farm in 
the parish of Ditchett, county of Somerset, comprising 
52^ acres, and of a messuage and garden at Amesbury, 
in the rent-free occupation of the master. Here is also 
a school founded under the will of Mr. Henry Spratt, 
in 1708, and endowed with land now let for 50 per 
annum ; and other schools are supported by subscrip- 
tion. The poor law union of Amesbury comprises 23 
parishes or places, and contains a population of 7698. 
To the west of the river is an ancient encampment, with 
a vallum and deep fosse, occupying an area of forty 
acres, commonly attributed to Vespasian, but undoubt- 
edly of British origin : the road from Amesbury to 
Warminster is cut through its rampart. The poet Gay 
passed much of his time at Amesbury, under the roof 
of his generous patrons, the Duke and Duchess of 
Queensbury. 

AMOTHERBY, a chapelry, in the parish of APPLE- 
TON-LE-STREET, union of MALTON, wapentake of RYE- 
DALE, N. riding of YORK, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from 
New Malton ; containing 239 inhabitants. This cha- 
pelry, which is bounded on the north by the river Rye, 
is situated on the road from Malton to Kirkby Moorside ; 
the surface is \indulated, and the scenery highly pictu- 
resque j the soil in the upland parts is rich, and in the 
valleys inferior ; limestone of fine quality is extensively 
55 



quarried. The tithes were commuted for land and a 
money payment, in 1776- There is a small chapel of 
ease, and a school is endowed with 20 acres of land, 
producing 16 per annum. 

AMPHIELD, or ANFIELD, a hamlet, in the parish 
and union of HURSLEY, hundred of BUDDLESGATE, 
Fawley and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMP- 
TON, 4 miles (S. S. W.) from Romsey. This pleasant 
village is situated on the high road to Winchester, and 
is inhabited by a considerable rural population. A dis- 
trict church has?been erected, chiefly at the expense of 
William Heathcote, Esq. 

AMPLEFORTH (ST. HILDA), a parish, in the union 
of HELMSLEY, partly in the wapentake of BIRDFORTH, 
and partly in that of RYEDALE, N. riding of YORK ; 
containing 446 inhabitants, of whom 207 are in the 
township of Ampleforth, 4^ miles (S. W. by S.) from 
Helmsley. The parish, anciently Ampleford, comprises 
by measurement 2270 acres. The village, which is long, 
and pleasantly situated, extends itself into the three 
townships of Ampleforth St. Peter, Ampleforth Bird- 
forth, and Oswaldkirk- Quarter ; it lies at the base of 
the hill which runs up to Hamilton, and on the south 
commands a beautiful view of the valley of De Mobray, 
embracing on the south-east Gilling Castle, and on the 
south-west Newborough park, which give to the vicinity 
a rich and diversified appearance. The living is a dis- 
charged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
4. 6.5^.; net income, 261 5 patron and appropria- 
tor, Prebendary of Ampleforth in the Cathedral of York. 
By an inclosure act in 1806, 199 acres were allotted in 
lieu of the vicarial tithes of the parish, and of all tithes 
for the township of Ampleforth. The church is an 
ancient structure, with a Norman doorway, beautifully 
carved and flowered. There is a place of worship for 
Wesleyans. At Oswaldkirk-Quarter is situated Ample- 
forth College, a Roman Catholic establishment, founded 
in 1802 by the members of the college of Dieulouard, 
near Pont-a-Mousson, in Lorraine, whose property was 
confiscated in the French revolution ; the students, 
about fifty in number, are instructed in the ancient and 
modern languages, mathematics, &c. The establish- 
ment, which has been several times enlarged, is situated 
in the midst of extensive pleasure-grounds, and com- 
mands some beautiful views of the surrounding coun- 
try. National schools, for the instruction of children of 
both sexes, have been established. Half a mile north 
of the village are the remains of a Roman camp ; and 
near it was discovered in March, 1808, by the Rev. 
Robert Nixon, a barrow, formed by a large circle of 
stones about ten feet in diameter, in which an urn and 
several ancient coins were found. 

AMPNEY, or ASHBROOK (ST. MARY THE VIRGIN), 
a parish, in the union of CIRENCESTER, hundred of 
CROWTHORNE and MINETY, E. division of the county 
of GLOUCESTER, 3^ miles (E.) from Cirencester ; con- 
taining 121 inhabitants. It is situated on the southern 
side of the road from Fairford to Cirencester, and has 
good quarries of limestone for building. The living is 
a perpetual curacy ; net income, 72, derived from 57 
acres of land ; patron and impropriator, Colonel Beach.^ 
The church stands at a distance from the village, and 
is a small structure. 

AMPNEY, or EASINGTON (ST. PETER), a parish, 
in the union of CIRENCESTER, hundred of CROWTHORNE 



A M P T 



and MINETY, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 
4% miles (E. by S.) from Cirencester; containing 196 
inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the Lon- 
don road, is of small extent, comprising by measure- 
ment 533 acres ; quarries of stone are slightly worked 
for mending the roads, and for fences, and same tiles 
are made here. There is a canal to Cirencester. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 90; patron, 
Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol ; appropriators, Dean 
and Chapter of Gloucester. On Rambury farm are the 
remains of a Roman camp, called Rambury Ring. 

AMPNEY-CRUCIS (Tus HOLY ROOD), a parish, in 
the union of CIRENCESTER, hundred of CROWTHORNE 
and MINETY, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 
3| miles (E.) from Cirencester ; containing, with the 
hamlet of Hiloot End, 591 inhabitants. It comprises 
by measurement 3088 acres ; the soil is various, in 
some parts of very inferior quality, and in others tolera- 
bly fertile ; stone suitable for repairing the roads is 
quarried. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 6. 9. 0^., and in the patronage 
of the Crown ; net income, 84 ; impropriator, G. G. 
Blackwell, Esq. The church has an embattled tower, 
and some portions of ancient architecture, among which 
is a handsome Norman arch, dividing the nave from 
the chancel. Here is a charity school, endowed, in 1719, 
by Robert Pleydell, Esq., with a rent- charge of 80. 

AMPNEY, DOWN (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of CIRENCESTER, hundred of CROWTHORNE and 
MINETY, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 4 
miles (S. W. by W.) from Fairford ; containing 425 
inhabitants. A portion of this parish lies in the northern 
division of the adjoining county of Wilts, and in the 
hundred of Highworth. The manor-house, a very in- 
teresting specimen of ancient architecture, was formerly 
one of the many seats of the Hungerford family, and is 
situated precisely on the border line of the two shires. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 10. 5. 8.; net income, 116; patrons and 
appropriators, Dean and Canons of Christ Church, 
Oxford. The church was built about the year 1260, by 
the Knights Templars, to whom Edward I. granted the 
living ; it is chiefly in the early English style, with a 
tower surmounted by a spire. A school is wholly sup- 
ported by Lady Caroline Elliott, who also contributes 
to the maintenance of an infants' school. 

AMPORT (8r. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
LUDGERSHALL, hundred of ANDOVER, Andover and N. 
divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON, 4^ miles (W. 
by S.) from Andover ; containing, with the tythings 
of East Cholderton and Sarson, 771 inhabitants, and 
comprising 3594 acres. The living is a vicarage, en- 
dowed with the rectorial tithes, with Appleshaw an- 
nexed, and valued in the king's books at 25. 7- 11-; 
patrons, Dean and Chapter of Chichester. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 830, and 
there are 70 acres of glebe. Pursuant to the will of 
the Rev. Thomas Sheppard, D.D., dated in 1812, a 
school, and an almshouse consisting of six tenements, 
were built here by his widow, who has vested in trus- 
tees the sum of 9000 for the maintenance of the 
widows, the schoolmistress's salary, medical attendance, 
and the repair of the buildings. 

AMPTHILL (ST. ANDREW), a market-town and 
parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of 
56 



REDBORNESTOKE, county of BEDFORD, 7 miles (S. by 
W.) from Bedford, and 45 (N. W. by N.) from London ; 
comprising by computation 1882 acres, and containing 
201 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry VI., Sir John 
Cornwall, created Lord Fanhope, built a castle on the 
manor of Ampthill, which, about the year 1530, came 
into the possession of the crown, and was made the 
head of an honour by act of parliament. Catherine of 
Arragon, while the business of her divorce was pending, 
resided here, where she received the summons to attend 
the commissioners at Dunstable, which she refused to 
obey ; and in memory of this, the Earl of Ossory, in 
1770, erected on the site of the castle a handsome 
column, with an appropriate inscription by Horace 
Walpole, Earl of Orford. The modern seat is chiefly 
remarkable for the number of very ancient oa'ks which 
ornament the park. The town, pleasantly situated 
between two hills, is irregularly built, paved with 
pebbles, and amply supplied with water ; it has been 
of late considerably improved by the removal of old 
buildings, and the erection of a good market-house. 
The market is on Thursday ; and fairs take place on 
the 4th of May and 30th of November, for cattle. The 
county magistrates hold petty-sessions for the hundred 
at this town ; and a court, for the honour of Ampthill 
is held in the moot-house, an ancient building, under 
the lord high steward, at which constables and other 
officers are appointed. 

The LIVING is a discharged rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 10. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Crown, 
with a net income of 330 : the tithes were commuted 
for land and corn-rents, under an inclosure act, in 1806. 
The church is a handsome cruciform structure, in the 
decorated and later English styles, with a square em- 
battled tower rising from the centre. There are places 
of worship for Independents, the Society of Friends, 
and Wesleyans. A charity school was endowed by 
Mrs. Sarah Emery, in 1691, with lands producing 30 
per annum, half of which is given to the parish of 
Meppershall. There is a feoffee charity of about 100 
per annum, derived from land and houses, for the 
benefit of the necessitous and industrious poor ; and 
about a quarter of a mile from the town is an hospital, 
founded by John Cross, in 1690, which affords a com- 
fortable asylum for nine men and four women, who each 
receive about 20 per year, with bedding, coal, &c. 
The interest arising from a legacy of 700, left by Mr. 
Arthur Whichelner, in 1687, for apprenticing children, 
is shared by this parish conjointly with those of Maul- 
den, Milbrook, and Ridgemont. The union of Ampthill 
comprises 19 parishes or places, and contains a popula- 
tion of 15,681. 

AMPTON (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
THINGOE, hundred of THEDWESTRY, W. division of 
SUFFOLK, 5^ miles (N. by E.) from Bury-St. Edmund's $ 
containing 147 inhabitants. In this parish, which com- 
prises 736a. 3r. 4p., is the seat of Lord Calthorpe, 
scarcely surpassed for beauty of situation by any man- 
sion or grounds in Suffolk. The living is a discharged 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 5. 2. 1., and in 
the gift of his lordship : the tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of J20, and the glebe consists of 20 
acres. Calthorpe's school, adjoining the churchyard, 
was founded and endowed in 1705, by James Calthorpe, 
Esq., and has property in land consisting of about 430 



A NC A 



A N C R 



acres, and yielding a rental of 384 ; in addition to 
which Henry Edwards, in 1715, bequeathed 100, with 
which, and other accumulations, 1017 three per cent, 
consols was purchased, paying a dividend of 30. A 
school for girls, and an infants' school, are chiefly sup- 
ported by Lord Calthorpe ; and on Ampton green is an 
almshouse for four unmarried women, founded under 
the will of Mrs. Dorothy Calthorpe, dated 1693, and 
endowed with 700 Old South Sea Annuities. 

AMWELL, GREAT (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a 
parish, in the union of WARE, hundred and county of 
HERTFORD, l mile (S. E. by S.) from Ware ; containing 
1545 inhabitants. . The parish contains 2443. Ir. lip., 
situated between the river Lea and the road from Cam- 
bridge to London ; and is supposed to take its name 
from " Emma's Well," which is now absorbed by the 
New River, which runs through, and greatly contributes 
to ornament the place. The village of Amwell, par- 
ticularly that part of it adjacent to the church, is one 
of the most beautiful in the county ; and within the 
limits of the parish is situated the East India College, 
founded in 1806, for the education of youths intended 
for the civil service of the company, and which con- 
tains accommodation for 105 students, who are super- 
intended by a principal and several professors. A 
pleasure fair is held on Whit-Monday. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 6 ; 
patron, Rev. Mordaunt Barnard ; impropriator, E. F. 
Whittingstall, Esq. The great tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 418. 11. 6., and the vicarial 
for 232 ; the glebe consists of 35 acres, with a house in 
a fine situation, built in 1840. The chancel of the 
church is separated from the nave by three very ancient 
arches, supposed to be Saxon. Hoddesdon chapel, a 
handsome brick edifice, is in the parish. There is a 
national school for girls, which was endowed, about 
1820, by Mrs. E. Jones, with 40 per annum ; there is 
also a national school for boys ; and another for boys and 
girls is supported by subscription. The remains of a 
Roman encampment are visible between the church and 
the vicarage-house. Great Amwell has been the resi- 
dence of some celebrated literary characters, among 
whom were Izaak Walton, the noted angler ; Mr. Scott, 
author of several poems and tracts ; and Hoole, the 
distinguished translator of Tasso, and biographer of Mr. 
Scott. The remains of Warner, the historian, were 
interred in the churchyard. 

AMWELL, LITTLE, a liberty, in the parish of ALL 
SAINTS, HERTFORD, union, hundred, and county of 
HERTFORD, l^r mile (S. E. by S.) from Ware; contain- 
ing 461 inhabitants. Here is a chapel of ease to the 
vicarage of All Saints. The New River, which supplies 
the metropolis with water, has its source in a spring 
that rises in this liberty, called Emma's Well. 

ANCASTER (ST. MARTIN), a parish, in the union of 
GRANTHAM, wapentake of LOVEDEN, parts of KESTEVEN, 
county of LINCOLN, 6f miles (N. E.) from Grantham, 
on the road to Sleaford ; containing, with the hamlets 
of West Willoughby and Sudbrook, 530 inhabitants. 
This place occupies the site of a Roman station on the 
line of the ancient Ermin- street, which Horsley con- 
jectured to have been Causennce, but the name of which 
has not been satisfactorily ascertained : it was formerly 
of much greater extent than it is at present, and various 
coins, foundations of buildings, vaults, and other relics 
VOL. I. 57 



of the Romans, have been discovered. During the civil 
war of the seventeenth century, the parliamentarian 
forces were defeated here by the royalists, under the 
command of Col. Cavendish. The parish comprises 
about 3000 acres, of which 2780 are arable, 200 pasture, 
and 14 woodland ; the soil is light, and the surface well 
wooded: The celebrated " Ancaster" quarries (which 
are really in the adjoining parish of Wilsford) yield 
beautiful building-stone. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 6. 13. 4., and 
in the patronage and incumbency of the Rev. Mr. 
Warren; net income, 151, arising from 120 acres of 
glebe. The church is an ancient and handsome build- 
ing, with a tower surmounted with a tall slender spire ; 
the arches on the north side of the nave are of Norman, 
and those on the south of early English, architecture ; 
the font is singularly elegant. There is a place of wor- 
ship for a congregation of Wesleyan Methodists. An- 
caster formerly gave the title of Duke to the family of 
Bertie. 

ANCROFT, a parochial chapelry, in the union of 
BERWICK-TJPON-TWEED, ISLANDSHIRE, county of DUR- 
HAM, locally to the north of Northumberland (with the 
northern division of which it is connected for the pur- 
pose of parliamentary election), 6 miles (S.) of the town of 
Berwick, and containing 1670 inhabitants, of whom 491 
are in the township. This place is situated in rich and 
pleasant ground, and comprises the villages of Ancroft, 
Cheswick, Haggerston, Scremerston, and Greenses, of 
which the first appears, from the numerous foundations 
of houses that have been discovered in the adjoining 
fields, to have been formerly of much greater extent 
than it is at present. The parish comprises 9622 statute 
acres, mostly arable, and is rich in mineral produce. 
Limestone is very abundant, and is quarried to a great 
extent for the supply of the neighbouring districts, and 
is also sent to Scotland ; freestone and coal are likewise 
wrought in considerable quantities. The great north road 
from London to Edinburgh passes through the parish. 
The surrounding scenery is finely diversified, and enli- 
vened with some handsome seats, among which is Lady- 
thorn, in the village of Cheswick, occupying an elevated 
situation, and commanding a fine view of Holy Island, 
the Farn islands, the coast from Bambrough Castle to 
Berwick, and the Cheviot hills in the distance. Hagger- 
ston Castle, the residence of Lady Stanley, is an old 
family mansion, built on the site of a more ancient 
castle, which was burnt down in 16 18, with the excep- 
tion of one of the towers, still remaining, in which Ed- 
ward II., in 1311, received homage of Thomas, Earl of 
Lancaster, for the earldom of Lincoln : the present 
house, which has received several additions within the 
last century, is beautifully situated in an extensive 
park, ornamented with fine groves and thriving planta- 
tions ; in the grounds and near the house is the domestic- 
chapel. There is a large colliery at Scremerston, the 
village of which was destroyed by the Scots in 1386, but 
was soon afterwards rebuilt. The Scremerston estate be- 
longed to the Earl of Derwentwater, on whose attainder 
it was forfeited to the crown, and now forms part of 
the possessions of Greenwich Hospital : the tithes of 
this property have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
965. 2. 8. 

The living of Ancroft is a perpetual curacy ; net in- 
come, 131 ; patrons and appropriators, Dean and 



A NDE 



ANDO 



Chapter of Durham. The church, a Norman structure, 
originally a chapel of ease to Holy Island, but now paro- 
chial, was enlarged in 1836, at an expense of 550, 
raised by subscription : the tower was so constructed 
that it served as a place of residence for the curate, and 
afforded him a protection from the Scottish marauders ; 
it was, until lately, roofless, and an ash-tree, which had 
its root in the vaulted floor of the first story, spread over 
its battlements. At Haggerston is a Roman Catholic 
chapel ; also a school, endowed with 10 yearly, and 
the master of which has a house rent-free. At Ancroft 
is a school in connexion with the National Society : the 
schoolroom and a cottage for residence were erected by 
Bishop Harrington, Archdeacon Bowyer, and the Dean 
and Chapter of Durham, in 1825. Sir Thomas Hagger- 
ston, who was created a baronet in 1643, and raised a 
regiment for the service of Charles I., was born at Hag- 
gerston. See SCREMERSTON. 

ANDERBY (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union of 
SPILSBY, Marsh division of the hundred of CALCE- 
WORTH, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 4^ miles 
(E. by S.) from Alford ; containing 243 inhabitants. 
The parish of Anderby comprises an area of about 1200 
statute acres of land, by computation, and extends to 
the coast of the North Sea, which bounds it on the 
east ; the village is scattered, and is in the manor of 
Bilsby, a neighbouring parish. The living is a dis- 
charged rectory, with that of Cumberworth united, valued 
in the king's books at 13. 10. 2|. ; net income, 548 ; 
patrons, President and Fellows of Magdalene College, 
Cambridge. On the inclosure of the parish a fixed 
money payment of 65. 7., and 8 acres of land, were 
assigned to the rector of Anderby in lieu of tithes for 
the portion inclosed. The church is a plain edifice. 
There is a place of worship for a congregation of Wes- 
leyan Methodists. 

ANDERSTON, or ANDERSON (Sr. MICHAEL), a pa- 
rish, in the union of BLANDFORD, hundred of COOMBS- 
DITCH, Blandford division of DORSET, 6 miles (S.) from 
Blandford-Forum ; containing 43 inhabitants. This 
parish, which is situated on the river Winterbourne 
(here a comparatively insignificant stream) comprises by 
measurement 566 acres, of which 414 are arable, and 
152 meadow and pasture. The living is a rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 6. 19. 1., and in the gift of S. B. 
Tregonwell, Esq. : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 120, and there are four acres of glebe. 
The church is an ancient edifice, and the place of sepul- 
ture of the family of the Tregonwells, whose former 
manor-house, a spacious building in the Elizabethan 
style, and in which is a chamber hung with decayed 
tapestry, is now the union workhouse. 

ANDERTON, a township, in the parish of GREAT 
BUDWORTH, union of NORTHWICH, hundred of BUCK- 
LOW, N. division of the county of CHESTER, if mile 
(N. W. by N.) from Northwich ; containing 331 inhabit- 
ants. It is intersected by the river Weaver, on the 
northern bank of which there is an almost uninterrupted 
line of salt-works : the Grand Trunk canal also passes 
through it. 

ANDERTON, a township, in the parish of STAN- 
DISH, union of CHORLEY, hundred of LEYLAND, N. di- 
vision of the county of LANCASTER, 4f miles (S. E. by S.) 
from Chorley, on the road from that town to Bolton ; 
containing 339 inhabitants. 
58 



ANDOVER (Sr. MARY), 
a borough, market -town, 
and parish, having exclu- 
sive jurisdiction, and the 
head of a union, locally in 
the hundred of ANDOVER, 
Andover and N. divisions 
of the county of SOUTH- 
AMPTON, 26 miles (N. by 
W.) from Southampton, and 
64 (W. S. W.) from London; 
comprising the hamlets of 
Charlton,Hatherden, King's 




Seal and Arms. 



Enhatn, Little London, Smannell, Wildhern, and Wood- 
house, and the chapelry of Foxcote, and containing 5013 
inhabitants. Andover, or, according to the charter, 
seal, and official documents, Andever, is a corruption of 
the Saxon Andeafara, which signifies the passage of the 
Ande, denoting the proximity of the town to the small 
river Ande, or Anton. In the church at this place Anlaf, 
King of Norway, in 994, received the sacrament of con- 
firmation, under the sponsorship of King Ethelred, pro- 
mising that he would never more come in a hostile 
manner to England, which engagement he religiously 
performed. The TOWN, situated on the border of the 
Wiltshire downs, and near the edge of an extensive 
woodland tract, forming the north-west portion of the 
county, is neat, airy, and well built ; it consists prin- 
cipally of three long streets, and is well paved under an 
act obtained in 1815, lighted with gas, supplied by a 
company lately formed among the inhabitants, and 
plentifully supplied with water. The manufacture of 
silk has, of late, entirely superseded that of shalloons, 
which was formerly carried on to a great extent ; and 
the construction of a canal from the town, through 
Stockbridge, to Southampton Water, has materially 
improved its trade, particularly in corn, malt, and 
timber, of which last a vast quantity is forwarded from 
Harewood Forest, for the supply of Portsmouth dock- 
yard. The principal market is on Saturday, and there 
is a smaller one on Wednesday : the fairs are on Mid- 
Lent Saturday and Old May-day, for horses, cattle, 
cheese, and leather ; on the 1 6th of November for sheep, 
and on the following day for horses, hops, cheese, &c. 
Three miles west of Andover, and within the out- 
hundred belonging to the town, is Weyhill, where an 
annual fair is held, which, originating in a revel an- 
ciently kept on the Sunday before Michaelmas-day, has 
gradually become the largest and best attended in Eng- 
land. It takes place on Oct. 10th and six following 
days, by charter of Queen Elizabeth, confirmed by 
Charles II. The first day is noted for the sale of sheep, 
of which the number sold has frequently exceeded 
170,000 ; on the second the farmers hire their servants ; 
after which hops, cheese, horses (particularly cart colts), 
cloth, &c., are exposed for sale. An additional fair, 
principally for sheep, was instituted in 1829, and is held 
on the 1st of August. 

The inhabitants appear to have received charters of 
INCORPORATION from Henry II. and Richard I., but the 
oldest now in their possession is one bestowed in the 
6th of King John's reign : several others were subse- 
quently granted, and that under which the borough was 
until recently governed, is dated in the 41st of Eliza- 
beth. By the act of the 5th and 6th of'Wm. IV. c. 76, 



A N G E 



A NGL 



the government is now vested in a mayor, four alder- 
men, and twelve councillors, assisted by a recorder, 
town-clerk, and other officers : the municipal boundaries 
are co-extensive with those of the parish, which is about 
twenty-two miles in circumference, and includes the 
parish of Knights- Enham and the tything of Foxcote, 
both locally in this parish. The borough sent represen- 
tatives to all the parliaments of Edward I., but made 
no return after the 1st of Edward II. till the 27th of 
Elizabeth, since which period it has continued to send 
two members : the right of election was formerly vested 
in the bailiff and corporation, in number about twenty- 
four, but was extended by the act of the 2nd of William 
IV. cap. 45, to the 10 householders ; the mayor is the 
returning officer. Courts of session are held quarterly ; 
courts leet occur at Easter and Michaelmas ; and the 
county magistrates hold a petty-session every Monday 
for the neighbouring district. The town-hall was erected 
in 1825, at an expense of 7000, towards defraying 
which each of the then members for the borough, Sir 
J. W. Pollen, Bart., and T. A. Smith, Esq., presented 
1000 : it is a handsome and spacious building of stcne, 
surmounted by a cupola ; on the ground-floor is the 
market-house, over which are a council-room for trans- 
acting the business of the corporation, and a hall for 
holding the quarter- sessions. 

The LIVING is a vicarage, valued in the king's books 
at 17. 4. 3%. ; net income, 350 ; patrons and impro- 
priators, Warden and Fellows of Winchester College. 
The church is an ancient building with a fine Norman 
doorway at the west end ; the chancel is separated from 
the nave by a belfry. There are places of worship for 
Baptists, the Society of Friends, Independents, and 
Wesleyans. A grammar school was founded and en- 
dowed in 1569, by John Hanson, Esq., whose benefac- 
tion was subsequently increased by Richard Kemys, 
Esq. In 1719, John Pollen, Esq., one of the representa- 
tives of the borough, erected a school-house and endowed 
it with 10 per annum, for twenty children ; in 1725, 
James Sambourne bequeathed 1000 for the instruc- 
tion of twenty-four children of Hatherden, in the parish ; 
and a national school, for which rooms have been erected, 
is supported by subscription. An hospital for eight 
poor men was founded by John Pollen, Esq. ; and six 
unendowed almshouses for women were built with funds 
bequeathed by Catherine Hanson, who also gave an acre 
of ground, planted with trees, to be appropriated as a 
walk for the recreation of the inhabitants. The union 
of Andover comprises 28 parishes or places in the county 
of Hants, and 4 in that of Wilts, and contains a popula- 
tion of 16,990. The Roman road from Winchester to 
Cirencester passed near Andover, and is yet visible in 
Harewood coppice ; and, besides two or three small 
encampments near the town, there is a large one, about 
a mile to the south-west, on the summit of Bury hill. 
Some beautiful specimens of Roman pavement have 
recently been discovered in the neighbourhood. And- 
over gives the inferior title of Viscount to the Earl of 
Suffolk. 

ANDWELL, an extra-parochial district, in the union 
and hundred of BASINGSTOKE, Basingstoke and N. divi- 
sions of the countyof SOUTHAMPTON, 4^ miles (E.) 
from Basingstoke ; containing 26 inhabitants. 

ANGERSLEIGH (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union of TAVNTON, hundred of TAUNTON and TAUNTON- 
59 



DEAN. W. division of SOMERSET, 4 miles (S. S. W.) from 
Tauntonj containing 42 inhabitants. It comprises by 
measurement 411 acres, of which the arable and pasture 
land are in nearly equal portions. The living is a dis- 
charged rectory, valued in the king's books at 4. 19. 4^. ; 
patron, Rev. Henry Tippets Tucker : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 98, and there are 
18 acres of glebe. 

ANGERTON, HIGH, a township, in the parish of 
HARTBURN, union of MORPETH, W. division of MOR- 
PETH ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 7 miles 
(W.) from Morpeth ; containing 75 inhabitants. This 
place is noticed in the year 1262 as the residence of the 
Baroness Theophania, widow of Hugh de Bolbeck, who 
was sheriff of Northumberland, governor of several 
castles, and held other offices of importance : from the 
Bolbecks both High and Low Angerton-went in regular 
descent to the Howards, with whom they continued until 
within the last few years. The township extends to the 
village of Hartburn, and comprises 1197 acres of rich 
loamy soil, whereof 550 are arable, 571 pasture, and the 
remainder woodland. The vicar of Hartburn receives 
125. 9- for the tithes of this place. 

ANGERTON, LOW, a township, in the parish of 
HARTBURN, union of MORPETH, W. division of MOR- 
PETH ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 7^ miles 
(W. by S.) from Morpeth ; containing 64 inhabitants. A 
branch of the Greys, of Howick, resided here in the 17th 
century, as tenants under the Earl of Carlisle. It com- 
prises 1075 acres, of which 383 are arable, 646 pasture, 
and 45^ wood : the river Waiisbeck runs through High 
and Low Angerton, and is bordered by rich pastures, 
and both townships are the property of Bradford Atkin- 
son, Esq., who has just completed a handsome mansion 
in the Elizabethan style. The village stands on a dry 
ridge of gravelly alluvium, with the Wansbeck on the 
north, and flat marshy gullies nearly round the other 
three sides. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 106, payable to the vicar of Hartburn. 

ANGLESEY, a newly-erected watering-place, in the 
parish of ALVERSTOKE, liberty of ALVERSTOKE and 
GOSPORT, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of 
SOUTHAMPTON, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Gosport. This 
interesting place occupies an elevated site at a small 
distance from Stoke's Bay, and nearly opposite to the 
town of Ryde, in the Isle of Wight. The mild tem- 
perature of the climate, the beauty and variety of the 
surrounding scenery, the facilities for sea-bathing, and 
the goodness of the roads in its vicinity, have united to 
render it eligible as a watering-place, and it has already 
obtained a considerable degree of patronage, which is 
rapidly increasing. The first building erected was Ux- 
bridge House, the seat of Robert Cruickshank, Esq., the 
founder of the town, the first stone of which was laid 
in 1826, by the Earl of Uxbridge, for his father, the 
Marquess of Anglesey, from whom the place derives its 
name. The buildings, consisting of a noble terrace and 
crescent, are situated within a spacious area inclosed 
with iron-railing, and tastefully laid out and ornamented 
with shrubs and flowers - within the inclosure is a fine 
elevated terrace- walk, commanding a view of the Isle of 
Wight, Stoke's Bay, the Mother Bank, and St. Helen's, 
with the shipping passing between Spithead and Ports- 
mouth harbour. A commodious hotel was built in 1830, 
but, being found too small for the accommodation of the 

12 



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ANNE 



increasing number of visiters, a house in the. adjoining 
crescent was added to it : there are also reading-rooms 
and public baths. The bay affords good anchorage for 
vessels, and a communication is kept up with Ports- 
mouth harbour, the dock-yard, and the other naval 
arsenals in the vicinity, by Haslar lake, a branch of the 
harbour, which flows up within a few yards of the north 
entrance into the town. 

ANGLEZARKE, a township, in the parish of BOL- 
TON, union of CHORLEY, hundred of SALFORD, S. divi- 
sion of the county of LANCASTER, 4f miles (E. S. E.) 
from Chorley ; containing 164 inhabitants. Here are 
several quarries which produce stone in great request 
for the paving of roads and streets ; grey slate is some- 
times obtained in small quantities ; and some years 
since an attempt was made to procure lead-ore, but not 
proving sufficiently profitable, the search was aban- 
doned. In the lead-mines carbonate of barytes was first 
discovered. 

ANGMERING, EAST and WEST ($T. PETER), a 
parish, in the union of PRESTON, (under Gilbert's Act), 
hundred of POLING, rape of ARUNDEL, W. division of 
SUSSEX, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from Arundel ; containing 
]002 inhabitants. This.place comprises East and West 
Angmering and Bargeham, formerly all distinct parishes, 
which were consolidated in 1573, since which time they 
have formed one parish, containing 4229 acres ; of these 
1Q33 are arable, 1895 pasture, and the rest underwood. 
Enst Angmering had anciently a weekly market, and an 
annual fair on the 31st of July; but the former has 
been long discontinued, and the latter has degenerated 
into a mere pleasure fair. The living comprises the 
rectory of West Angmering, with the vicarage of East 
Angmering consolidated, valued jointly in the king's 
books at 21. 9. 8.; patron, Capt. Pechell ; impro- 
priator of the vicarage, the Rev. J. Usborne. The im- 
propriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 26, the rectorial for 290, and the vicarial for 8. 5. 
The church is a handsome structure in the later English 
style, with a square embattled tower, and was repewed 
in 1837; it contains several monumental tablets to the 
Gratericke family. A school was founded by William 
Older, who in 16*9 endowed it with a cottage and gar- 
den, and 30 acres of land at East Angmering, now pro- 
ducing 90 per annum. On the lands of the church 
farm on the western borders of the parish a Roman 
bath was discovered in 1819- 

ANGRAM, a township, in the parish of LONG MARS- 
TON, W. division of AINSTY wapentake, W. riding of 
YORK, 5 miles (N. E. by N.) from Tadcaster ; containing 
78 inhabitants. The road from York to Wetherby passes 
at a short distance on the north. In 1705, Edward 
Randall bequeathed 200 to the poor of Marston, Hut- 
ton, and Angram, the produce of which is applied to the 
instruction of children. 

ANGRAM-GRANGE, a township, in the parish of 
COXWOLD, union of EASINGWOULD, wapentake of BIRD- 
FORTH, N. riding of YORK, 4f miles (N.) from Easing- 
would ; comprising 438a. 3r. 24p., and containing 24 
inhabitants. The impropriate tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 106, payable to Trinity 
College, Cambridge. 

ANICK, a township, in the parish of ST. JOHN-LEE, 
union of HEXHAM, S. division of TINDALE ward and of 
NORTHUMBERLAND, If mile (N. E. by E.) from HEX- 
60 



HAM ; containing 146 inhabitants. It comprises 360 
acres, of which 270 are arable, and 90 meadow and 
pasture ; about 9 acres are on the south side of the 
Tyne, and the remainder, including an island of 13 acres 
of grass land, are on its northern bank, gradually and 
beautifully sloping to the river, which sometimes over- 
flows the grounds in its vicinity ; the soil is various, but 
rendered productive by means of artificial manure. The 
Newcastle and Carlisle railway skirts the township on 
the south. At Hexham Bridge End is a large brewery. 
The tithes have been commuted for rent-charges amount- 
ing to 104, of which 75. 13. 4. are payable to the 
impropriators, and 28. 6. 8. to the perpetual curate. 

ANICK- GRANGE, a township, in the parish of 
ST. JOHN-LEE, union of HEXHAM, S. division of TIN- 
DALE ward and of NORTHUMBERLAND, l mile (E. N. 
E.) from Hexham ; containing 40 inhabitants. It for- 
merly belonged to the monastery of Hexham ; and is 
now the property of T. W. Beaumont, Esq., having a 
court baron attached. John Harbottle, Esq. resides here. 

ANLABY, a township, partly in the parish of 
HESSLE, but chiefly in that of KIRK-ELLA, county of 
the town of HULL, union of SCULCOATES, E. riding of 
YORK, 3 miles (W.) from Hull ; containing 423 inha- 
bitants. This place was anciently a possession of a 
family of the same name, and in 1100 a great part of 
the estate passed, by intermarriage with its heiress, into 
the family of Legard, of whom Sir Thomas D. Legard, 
of Ganton, in this county, is the present representative. 
The township comprises about 2020 acres, including the 
adjacent hamlets of Wolfreton and Tranby, the former 
of which, consisting of 355 acres, is partly in the town- 
ship of Kirk-Ella. There is a place of worship for Wes- 
leyans. 

ANMER (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
DOCKING, hundred of FREEBRIDGE-LYNN, W. division 
of NORFOLK, 11 miles (N. E.) from Lynn; contain- 
ing 175 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 9. 0. 1., and in 
the gift of H. Coldham, Esq. : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 194, and the glebe consists 
of 70 acres. The church, which is picturesquely situated 
in the grounds of the Hall, is chiefly in the decorated 
and later styles, and consists of a nave and chancel, with 
a chapel on the south side, and an embattled tower. 
On opening a tumulus a few years ago in the park, a 
fine Roman urn, containing bones and ashes, was disco- 
vered. 

ANN, ABBOTTS. See ABBOT' S-ANN. 

ANNE (ST.), or BRIERS. See OWRAM, SOUTH. 

ANNESLEY (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union 
of BASFORD, N. division of the wapentake of BROXTOW 
and of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 10 miles (N. N. W.) 
from Nottingham ; containing, with the harnlets of 
Annesley-Woodhouse and Wandesley, and the extra- 
parochial district of Felly, 315 inhabitants. This parish 
comprises 3030 acres by measurement : it is intersected 
by the road from Nottingham to Kirkby Sutton, and is 
irregular in its surface, which in many parts rises into 
mountainous ridges. The soil rests on red sandstone, 
of which there are some quarries supplying an inferior 
material used chiefly for walls and small houses. The 
village is picturesquely situated ; several of its inhabit- 
ants are engaged in the manufacture of stockings. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 52 ; patron 



A N ST 



A NST 



and impropriator, J. Musters, Esq. The church is an- 
cient, and has a tower with two bells. 

ANNFIELD PLAIN, a colliery village, in the town- 
ship of KYO, parish and union of LANCHESTER, W. di- 
vision of CHESTER ward, N. division of the county of 
DURHAM, 11 miles (S. S. W.) from Gateshead. This 
place has risen into some importance, and increased its 
population to 500, in consequence of the opening of a 
coal-pit, which is now in operation by the Pontop and 
South Shields Company, and of which the produce is 
conveyed to the shipping by the Pontop and South 
Shields railway. Edward Smith, Esq., head viewer of 
the mine, has a neat residence here. There is a place 
of worship for Primitive Methodists ; and a day school 
for the instruction of the pitmen's children is aided by 
15 per annum from the company. 

ANSLEY (ST. LAWRENCE), a parish, in the union 
of ATHERSTONE, Atherstone division of the hundred of 
HEMLINGFORD, N. division of the county of WARWICK, 
5| miles (W. by N.) from Nuneaton ; containing 701 
inhabitants. It is intersected by the Oxford canal, and 
comprises by measurement, about 2700 acres, of which 
37 are woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 6. 6. 8., and in the pa- 
tronage of the Crown ; net income, 1 16 ; impropriator, 
D. S. Dugdale, Esq. A school in connexion with the 
National Society has been established. There are some 
remains of an ancient castle. 

ANSLOW, or ANNESLEY, a township, in the parish 
of ROLLESTON, union of BURTON-UPON-TRENT, N. divi- 
sion of the hundred of OFFLOW and of the county of 
STAFFORD, 3f miles ( N. W. by W.) from Burton 5 con- 
taining 278 inhabitants. There is a place of worship 
for Wesley ans. 

ANSTEY, a hamlet, in the parish of HILTON, union 
of BLANDFORD, hundred of WHITEWAY, Blandford 
division of DORSET ; containing 200 inhabitants. 

ANSTEY (Sr. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
FOLESHILL, county of the city of COVENTRY, N. divi- 
sion of the county of WARWICK, 5^ miles (N. E.) from 
Coventry ; containing 224 inhabitants. This place is 
situated at the north-eastern extremity of the liberties 
of Coventry, and on the road from that city to Wolvey 
heath, and thence to Leicester ; it was originally called 
Heanstige, from the Saxon hean, high, and stige, a path- 
way. It comprises by computation 1000 acres, and, 
with the exception of about 300 acres, is the property 
of the Dean and Canons of Windsor ; the Oxford canal 
passes through the village. The living is a vicarage, 
not in charge, with a net income of 63 ; it is in the 
patronage of the Crown, and the Dean and Canons are 
appropriators. The church is said to have been founded 
in the time of Henry I. There is a national school. 

ANSTEY, a parish, in the union of BUNTINGFORD, 
hundred of EDWINSTREE, county of HERTFORD, 4 miles 
(N. E.) from Buntingford ; containing 497 inhabitants. 
It is situated on the road to Cambridge through Bark- 
.way, and comprises 205 la. 3r. lip. A fair is held on 
July 15th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 21. 13. 4.; net income, 504 ; patrons, Mas- 
ter and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. Corn- 
rents were assigned to the rector under a private act in 
1826, as a commutation in lieu of tithes. The church 
is a cruciform edifice, with a central tower surmounted 
by a short spire supported by Saxon arches, and is said 
61 



to have been built from the ruins of a castle erected by 
Eustace, Earl of Boulogne, soon after the Conquest, 
traces of which are still visible. 

ANSTEY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BARROW-UPON-SOAR, hundred of WEST GOSCOTE, N. 
division of the county of LEICESTER, 3f miles (N. W.) 
from Leicester ; containing 838 inhabitants. This place, 
formerly called Hanstigie, or Anstige, is situated between 
the forests of Charnwood and Leicester, and at the dis- 
solution of religious houses belonged to the priory of 
Ulverscroft, with a reserved rent of 3s. 4d., and a pound 
of pepper, due to the Lord of Groby. The living is con- 
solidated with the rectory of Thurcaston : the church is 
.an ancient edifice. There is a place of worship for 
Wesleyans. In 1376, certain lands, described as "lying 
in the fields of Anstey in Wolfdale," were granted by 
John Lenerych, of Leicester; and in 1490 the " Brere*- 
yard" was devised by Thomas Martyn and William 
Haket, and vested in trustees for the repair of the 
church, bridges, and causeways of this place. 

ANSTEY (Sx. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
TISBURY, hundred of DUNWORTH, Hindon and S. divi- 
sions of WILTS, 5j miles (S. E. by S.) from Hindon ; 
containing 329 inhabitants. It comprises 1000 acres ; 
the surface is hilly in some parts, and the soil chalky 
and sandy. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the pa- 
tronage of Lord Arundel ; net income, 22. Here was 
a commandery of the Knights Hospitallers, founded by 
Walter de Turberville in the reign of John, the revenue 
of which at the dissolution was 81. 8. 5. ; its remains 
have been converted into a farm-house. Dr. Richard 
Zouch, an eminent civilian, and judge of the court of 
admiralty, in the reign of Charles I., was a native of the 
place. 

ANSTEY, EAST (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of SOUTH MOLTON, South Molton 
and N. divisions of DEVON, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from 
Dulverton ; containing 240 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is situated on the road to Barnstaple, comprises 
about 2170 acres ; there are some quarries of stone, 
which are worked for building and other purposes. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 11; 
net income, 180; patron, Rev. A. Lloyd. The church 
is a plain neat edifice, with a tower; and the church- 
yard commands an extensive view. 

ANSTEY PASTURES, an extra-parochial liberty, 
in the union of BARROW-UPON-SOAR, hundred of WEST 
GOSCOTE, N. division of the county of LEICESTER, 3f 
miles (N. W.) from Leicester; containing 15 inhabitants. 
This place, formerly parcel of the " Ffrith of Leicestre," 
and of the ancient duchy of Lancaster, was granted in 
the 27th of Elizabeth to Thomas Martyn and others, on 
a lease of 31 years, and after the expiration of that 
term was purchased, in the 4th of James I., from Robert, 
Earl of Salisbury, lord treasurer of England, by Robert 
Martyn, of Anstey, whose descendants have a seat here. 
The sum of 40 per annum, arising from lands allotted 
under an inclosure act, is applied to the repairing of 
the highways and bridges ; and 10, and a further sum 
from Lord Stamford, are annually distributed in bread 
and linen among the poor. 

ANSTEY, WEST (ST. PETROCK), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of SOUTH MOLTON, South Molton 
and N. divisions of DEVON, 3| miles (W.) from Dulver- 
ton ; containing 279 inhabitants. In this parish are 



A NTH 



A NTI 



some quarries of stone for building. The living is a 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 10. 16. 8. j 
patrons and appropriators, Dean and Chapter of Exeter. 
The great tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 76. 17., and the vicarial for 112 ; the glebe consists 
of 37^ acres. The church is a substantial edifice, with 
a tower, and is in good repair. A school is endowed 
with 3 per annum ; and there is an endowed alms- 
house for the reception of aged and infirm poor. 

ANSTON, NORTH and SOUTH (ST. JAMES), a pa- 
rish, in the union of WORKSOP, S. division of the wapen- 
take of STRAFFORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, 
6 miles (W. N. W.) from Worksop ; containing, with 
the township of Woodsetts, 1 102 inhabitants. The pa- 
rish is on the road from Sheffield to Worksop, and com- 
prises about 4000 acres, of which the surface is varied, 
cfnd the scenery picturesque. Freestone of good quality 
and of a beautiful colour is extensively wrought, and 
from the quarries has been raised the stone for the new 
houses of parliament. The manufacture of malt, starch, 
and nails is carried on to a moderate extent. The vil- 
lages, once called Church Anstan, and Chapel Anstan, 
respectively, are pleasantly situated on opposite emi- 
nences, between which flows one of the little streams 
that unite and form the Ryton ; they are exceedingly 
neat and clean, and the rivulet after leaving their imme- 
diate vicinity, passes into a little glen, where stands 
Wood-mill, possessed of considerable rural beauty. The 
Chesterfield canal, which bounds the parish on the 
north, affords facility of conveyance. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Prebendary of 
Laughton-en-le-Morthen in York Cathedral, with a net 
income of 84 : the tithes for the manor of North Anston 
were commuted, in 1767, for an allotment of land and 
a money payment. The church is a neat structure in 
the later English style, and consists of a nave, side 
aisles, and chancel, with a square tower surmounted by 
a small spire; it contains some monuments to the 
Lizour, Beauchamp, and D'Arcy families, with a finely 
sculptured figure of a lady bearing an infant in her arms. 
There are places of worship for Independents and Wes- 
leyans. Between the villages is situated an endowed 
school. 

ANTHONY (ST.) in MENEAGE, a parish, in the 
union of HELSTON, W. division of the hundred of KER- 
RIER and of the county of CORNWALL, 7 miles (S. by 
W.) from Falmouth ; containing 3 13 inhabitants. Dur- 
ing the civil war of the seventeenth century, a small 
intrenchment here, called Little Dinas, was occupied by 
the royalists, for the defence of Helford harbour, but 
was captured by the parliamentarian forces under Sir 
Thomas Fairfax, in 1646. The parish, which is situated 
on the estuary of the river Helford, and divided by a 
creek that runs into it from the Nase Point to Gillan, 
comprises by measurement 1510 acres ; the high grounds 
command fine views. The living is a discharged vicar- 
age, valued in the king's books at 4. 15. 10., and in the 
patronage of the Crown ; impropriators, the family of 
Gregor : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 210 for the great, and 140 for the vica- 
rial, and the glebe comprises 62^ acres. The church, 
situated at the foot of the promontory of Little Dinas, 
within fifty yards of the sea, is an ancient and elegant 
structure, with a tower built of a very fine granite, said 
to have been brought from Normandy. There is a 
62 



place of worship for Bryanites. At Conderra, in 1735, 
were found a very large number of Roman brass coins, 
chiefly those of the Emperor Constantine and his family. 
Here was anciently a cell to the priory of Ty wardreth. 

ANTHONY (ST.) in ROSELAND, a parish, in the 
union of TRURO, W. division of the hundred of POWDER 
and of the county of CORNWALL, 9i miles (S. W. by S.) 
from Tregony ; containing 144 inhabitants. It lies at 
the extreme point of Roseland, a verdant and bold 
peninsular promontory, connected on the north by a 
narrow isthmus with the parish of Gerrans. The living 
is a donative, in the patronage of S. T. Spry, Esq. : the 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 118. 
The church, beautifully situated on the border of a navi- 
gable lake, which separates this parish from St. Mawes, 
contains some handsome monuments to the Spry family, 
of which one, by Westmacott, is to the memory of Sir 
Richard Spry, Rear-Admiral of the White. An Augus- 
tine priory, subordinate to that of Plympton, in the 
county of Devon, existed here till the general dissolu- 
tion ; its remains have been converted into a private 
residence called Place House. 

ANTHONY, WEST (ST. ANTHONY AND ST. JOHN 
THE BAPTIST), a parish, in the union of ST. GERMANS, 
S. division of the hundred of EAST, E. division of CORN- 
WALL, 5^ miles (S. E.) from St. Germans ; containing, 
with the chapelry of Torpoint, 2894 inhabitants. The 
living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 12. 17. 8^., and in the gift of the Rt. Hon. 
R. P. Carew, the impropriator : the incumbent's tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 307. 3. 6., 
with a glebe of 6 acres, and the great tithes for one of 
284. 13. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 
A small endowed school was founded in 1766, by Sir 
Coventry Carew, Bart, j and a national school was com- 
menced in 1H23. 

ANTHORN, a township, in the parish of BOWNESS, 
union of WIGTON, CUMBERLAND ward, and E. division 
of CUMBERLAND, 8 miles (N. W. by N.) from Wigton; 
containing 207 inhabitants. Here is a school with a 
small endowment. 

ANTINGHAM (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of ERPINGHAM, hundred of NORTH ERPINGHAM, E. 
division of NORFOLK, 2^ miles (N. W.) from North 
Walsham ; containing 271 inhabitants. It is intersected 
by the road from North Walsham to Cromer, and com- 
prises ISOQa, 3r. 36p., of which 1356 acres are arable, 
33 pasture and meadow, 56 woodland, and 13 water, 
consisting of two lakes forming the principal source of 
the river Ant, which was made navigable to the eastern 
boundary of the parish in 1 806. The living is a dis- 
charged rectory, valued in the king's books at 6.3. 1^.; 
patron, Lord Suffield. Antingham, St. Margaret's, is 
also a discharged rectory, consolidated with North 
Walsham, valued at 5. 6. 8., and in the gift of the 
Bishop of Norwich as abbot of St. Benet's at Holme. 
The tithes of St. Mary's have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 340, with nearly 16 acres of glebe ; and 
those of St. Margaret's for a rent-charge of 28. 10.' 
The church of St. Mary is chiefly in the decorated style, 
with an embattled tower: in the churchyard are the 
remains of the church of St. Margaret, consisting of its 
tower, and some of its side walls. Neat schoolrooms 
were erected by the late Lord Suffield, at a cost exceeding 
2000. 



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A PPL 



ANTROBUS, a township, in the parish of GREAT 
BUDWORTH, union of RUNCORN, hundred of BUCKLOW, 
N. division of the county of CHESTER, 5 miles (N. N. W.) 
from Northwich ; containing 489 inhabitants. A school 
is supported principally by subscription. 

ANWICK (ST. EDITH), a parish, in the union of 
SLEAFORD, wapentake of FLAXWELL, parts of KESTE- 
VEN, county of LINCOLN, 4f miles (N. E.) from Slea- 
ford ; containing 314 inhabitants. The living is a dis- 
charged vicarage, united, with the rectory of Dunsby, to 
the rectory of Brauncewell, and valued in the king's 
books at 5. 3. 11^. ; impropriator, S. Hazelwood, Esq. 
The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents, 
under an inclosure act, in 1791. 

APESTHORPE. See APPLESTHORPE. 

APETHORPE (ST. LEONARD), a parish, in the union 
of OUNDLE, hundred of WILLYBROOK, N. division of 
the county of NORTHAMPTON, 4^: miles (S. W. by W.) 
from Wansford ; containing 269 inhabitants. The 
parish is situated on the road from King's Cliff to 
Oundle, and on the Willybrook, at the border of Rock- 
ingham forest, and comprises 1669#. 15/>., a portion of 
which is occupied by Apethorpe Hall, the seat of the 
Earl of Westmorland. The living is a perpetual curacy; 
net income, 61 ; patron, Prebendary of Nassing- 
ton in the Cathedral of Lincoln. The church con- 
tains a sumptuous monument to the memory of Sir 
Anthony Mildmay, Bart., and his lady ; and another 
with the recumbent figure of an infant, the eldest son 
of Lord Burgh?rsh, beautifully sculptured by a Floren- 
tine artist. The Earl of Westmorland, by indenture in 
1684, charged a farm with the payment of 36 annually 
in lieu of certain rent-charges assigned by his ancestors, 
for apprenticing boys and girls of Apethorpe, Wood- 
Newton, Nassington, and Yarwell. 

APETON, a township, in the parishes of BRADLEY 
and GNOSALL, union of NEWPORT, W. division of the 
hundred of CUTTLESTONE, S. division of the county of 
STAFFORD. 

APLEY (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the W. division 
of the wapentake of WRAGGOE, parts of LINDSEY, union 
and county of LINCOLN, 3 miles (S. W.) from Wragby ; 
containing 162 inhabitants. It comprises 1660 acres 
by measurement, of which 250 are woodland ; the 
surface is flat, and the soil a cold clay, subject to inun- 
dation from a stream that divides Apley from the 
parish of Stainfield. The living is a perpetual curacy, 
valued in the king's books at 6 ; net income, 20 ; 
patron and impropriator, T. Tyrwhitt Drake, Esq. For- 
merly there was a church, but at present there is 
only a small building erected on its site, in which the 
minister reads the funeral service, and the parishioners 
hold their vestries. 

APPERLEY, a township, in the parish of BYWELL- 
ST. PETER, union of HEXHAM, E. division of TIN- 
DALE ward, S. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 2^ miles 
(S. by E.) from Bywell ; containing 34 inhabitants. It 
is situated at a short distance from the border of the 
county of Durham : the Roman Watling- street passes 
on the south-west ; and a stream, tributary to the Tyne, 
flows at this place in nearly the same direction. 

APPERLY, with WHITEFIELD, a hamlet, in that 

part of the parish of DEERHURST which is in the Lower 

division of the hundred of WESTMINSTER, union of 

TEWKESBURY, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 

63 



4^ miles (S. W. by S.) from Tewkesbury ; containing 420 
inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 

APPLEBY MAGNA (S T . MICHAEL), a parish, in 
the union of ASHBY-DE-LA-ZOUCH, partly in the hun- 
dred of REPTON and GRESLEY, S. division of the 
county of DERBY, but chiefly in the hundred of SPARK- 
ENHOE, S. division of LEICESTER, 5f miles (S. W. byS.) 
from Ashby ; comprising 2803a. 3r., and containing 
1075 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 20. 9. 4|. ; net income, 750, with a 
house; patron, George Moore, Esq. The tithes were 
commuted for land and a money payment, under an 
intlosure act, in 1771. The church, which is in Leices- 
tershire, was repaired and repewed in 1830, when some 
windows of painted glass were added by private dona- 
tion ; it contains a curious monument to Sir Stephen 
and Lady Appleby. The free grammar school was 
founded in 1699 by Sir John Moore, Knt., lord mayor 
of London in 1682, who endowed it with an estate at 
Upton, consisting of 228 acres of land, producing about 
315 per annum; the buildings, forming a spacious 
and handsome structure, were erected by Sir Christo- 
pher Wren. There is also a national school. 

APPLEBY (ST. BARTHOLOMEW), a parish, in the 
union of GLANDFORD-BRIDGE, N. division of the wapen- 
take of MANLEY, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 
7 miles (N. W. by N.) from Glandford-Bridge ; contain- 
ing, with the hamlet of Raventhorpe, 505 inhabitants. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 10. 4. ; net income, 150; patron, C. W T inn, 
Esq. Sixteen children are instructed by means of a 
donation of 10 per annum from Mrs. Winn, and a 
contribution of 5 from the parish. 

Seal and Arms. 




Obverse. 



Reverse. 



APPLEBY, an incorporated market-town (formerly 
a representative borough), having separate jurisdiction, 
locally in EAST ward, union of EAST ward, county of 
WESTMORLAND, of which it is the chief town, 2/4 miles 
(N. N. W.) from London ; containing 1075 inhabitants. 
This place is thought, but on uncertain grounds, to have 
been a Roman station : Camden, from a similarity of 
name, erroneously calls it Aballaba ; and Horsley con- 
siders it to have been the Roman Galacum. A Roman 
road passed near it from Langton, on the east, to Red- 
land's Bank on the north-west ; and some antiquities of 
the same people have been discovered in the vicinity. 
It has long been the head of a barony, sometimes called 
the barony of Westmorland; the rest of the county, 
which forms the barony of Kendal, having been an- 
ciently included in Lancashire and Yorkshire. It was 
granted by the Conqueror to Ranulph de Meschines, 



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whose son Ranulph, having in his mother's right suc- 
ceeded to the earldom of Chester, gave it to his sister, the 
wife of Robert d'Estrivers. It afterwards came into the 
possession of the Engains and Morvilles, and was seized 
by the crown, in consequence of the participation of a 
member of the latter family in the murder of Thomas 
a Becket. King John bestowed it, together with the 
" Sheriffwick and rent of the county of Westmorland," 
upon Robert de Veteripont, lord of Curvaville, in Nor- 
mandy, whose grandson, Robert, joining the confederated 
barons, in the reign of Henry III., it escheated to the 
crown, but was restored to the two younger daughters 
of Robert, and subsequently, by marriage, came into 
the possession of the illustrious family of Clifford, 
whose descendants, the Tuftons, earls of Thanet, have 
ever since enjoyed it, with all its rights and dignities. 
The town was anciently of much greater magnitude 
than it is at present, as is evident from the situation 
of a township called Burruls (Borough Walls), a mile 
distant, and from the discovery of old foundations at 
the distance of more than two miles, to which the town 
and its suburbs formerly extended. An ancient record, 
about the period of the reign of Edward I., makes men- 
tion of a sheriff of Applebyshire ; from which it appears 
that the town gave name to one of those districts into 
which Edward the Confessor divided the earldom of 
Northumberland. It retained its importance from the 
time of the Romans until the year 1 176, when William, 
King of Scotland, surprised the castle, and destroyed 
the town ; from which calamity, however, it had so 
far recovered in the reign of Henry III., that a court 
of exchequer was established here. A Carmelite mo- 
nastery was founded at Battleborough, in the parish of 
St. Michael, in l<281, by the Lords Vesey, Clifford, 
and Percy, the site of which is now occupied by a neat 
modern mansion, called the Friary. In the year 1388 
the town was again totally laid waste by the Scots, 
from the effects of which it never afterwards recovered : 
so that, in the reign of Philip and Mary, it was found 
necessary to reduce the ancient fee-farm rent, due to the 
crown, from twenty marks to two. In 1598 it was 
nearly depopulated by the plague, and its market was 
consequently removed to Gilshaughlin, a village, five 
miles distant. At the commencement of the parliamen- 
tary war, the castle was garrisoned for the king by the 
Lady Anne Clifford, Countess of Pembroke and Mont- 
gomery, and continued in his interest until after the 
battle of Marston-Moor, when all the northern for- 
tresses fell into the possession of the parliament. 

The TOWN is pleasantly situated on the river Eden, 
by which it is almost surrounded, and on the great 
north road ; it is well paved and amply supplied with 
water, and consists of one spacious street, intersected 
at right angles by three smaller, and terminated at one 
extremity by the castle, and at the other by the church 
of St. Lawrence ; at' each end also is a handsome stone 
obelisk, or cross. An ancient stone bridge of two 
arches, over the Eden, connects the suburb of Bongate 
with the borough. The castle stands on a steep and 
richly-wooded eminence rising from the river : it suf- 
fered much in the wars with Scotland, especially in the 
reigns of Richard II. and Henry IV. Of the original 
structure, said to be of Roman foundation, only a 
detached portion, called Cresar's tower, and a small 
part of the south-east end, remain j the greater part of 
64 



it was rebuilt by Lord Clifford, in the reign of Henry 
VI., and again by Thomas, Earl of Thanet, in 1686. 
The castle is of square form, and contains several apart- 
ments of noble dimensions, adorned with a large and 
valuable collection of ancient family portraits ; the 
magnificent suit of gold and steel armour worn by 
George Clifford in the tilt-yard, when he acted as cham- 
pion to his royal mistress Queen Elizabeth, is also pre- 
served here, as too is the famous genealogical picture of 
the Veteriponts, Cliffords, and Tuftons. The shrievalty 
of the county of Westmorland is hereditary, and has 
descended lineally through the male and female line 
from the year 1066 to the present time. The castle 
has been from time immemorial the temporary resi- 
dence of the judges travelling the northern circuit, who 
are entertained here at the expense of the Earl of Thanet. 
In the vicinity are lead-mines worked by the London Min- 
ing Company ; also quarries of red freestone used for 
building; and at Coupland-Beck is a carding and spin- 
ning-mill, where yarn is spun for coarse woollen cloth, 
stockings, and carpets. The market is on Saturday; and 
fairs are held on the Saturday before Whit- Sunday, for 
cattle ; on Whit-Monday for linen cloth, and the hiring 
of servants ; the second Wednesday in June (commonly 
called Brampton Fair), and the 21st of August, for 
horses, cattle, sheep, woollen cloth, cheese, and other 
articles. The market-house, or the cloisters, is a hand- 
some structure near the church, rebuilt by the cor- 
poration in 1811, in the early style of English archi- 
tecture, after a design by Mr. Smirke. 

Appleby, which is a BOROUGH by prescription, re- 
ceived a charter of incorporation from Henry I., with 
privileges equal to those of York, which was confirmed 
by Henry II., King John, Henry III., Edward I., and 
Edward III. ; the last monarch's charter reciting that 
the borough had been seized by Edward II. for an 
arrear of rent, and was then in the possession of the 
crown ; and granting the town again to the burgesses, 
on the same terms as before. The officers of the corpo- 
ration are a mayor, deputy-mayor, twelve aldermen, and 
sixteen common-councilmen, assisted by a recorder, 
town-clerk, two coroners, two chamberlains, a sword- 
bearer, mace-bearer, two sergeants-at-mace, and two 
bailiffs ; the mayor is a justice of the peace, but exer- 
cises only a limited jurisdiction. Petty-sessions are 
held here by the county magistrates every Saturday ; 
the assizes for the county also take place here ; and the 
general quarter-sessions are held alternately at Appleby 
and Kendal, the Easter and Michaelmas at the former, 
and the Epiphany and Midsummer at the latter. The 
town-hall is a large ancient edifice in the principal 
street. The county gaol and house of correction has 
been adapted to the radiating plan : adjoining it is the 
shire-hall, built in 1771- The borough sent members to 
parliament from the 23rd of Edward I., but was dis- 
franchised by the act of the 2nd of William IV. cap. 
45 : the right of election was vested in the 'holders of 
burgage tenements, in number about 200 ; and the 
mayor was the returning officer. Appleby is the place 
of election of knights of the shire, for which also it has 
been constituted a polling-place. 

The town is situated in the parishes of St. Lawrence 
and St. Michael, that portion of it which is in the latter 
being named Bongate : St. Lawrence's contains a popu- 
lation of 1354, and St. Michael's one of 1165. The 



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LIVINGS of both are vicarages. That of St. Lawrence 
is valued in the king's books at 9. 5. 2^., and has a 
net income of 306 : it is in the patronage of the Dean 
and Chapter of Carlisle, and attached to it are 51 acres 
of ancient glebe, and 252 allotted in lieu of tithes. That 
of St. Michael is valued at 20. 13. 9. ; net income, 
175) patron, Bishop of Carlisle. The tithes of the 
manor of Appleby were commuted for land, under an in- 
closure act, in 1772 : the Dean and Chapter are appro- 
priators of both parishes. The church of St. Lawrence 
is partly in the decorated, and partly in the later style of 
English architecture ; it contains the remains of Anne, 
the celebrated Countess of Pembroke, Dorset, and 
Montgomery, who died in 1675, and of her mother, the 
Countess of Cumberland, to the memory of each of 
whom there is a splendid marble monument. The 
church of St. Michael is situated about three-quarters of 
a mile south-east of the town ; and about three miles 
and a half from it, between the villages of Hilton and 
Murton, is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The free 
grammar school, founded by the burghers, existed long 
before the dissolution of religious houses, but was estab- 
lished on its present foundation in the 16th of Elizabeth, 
when the management was vested in ten governors, who 
are a corporate body : the endowment, arising from 
different sources, is about 200 per annum. It has five 
exhibitions, of 8 per annum each, to Queen's College, 
Oxford, founded by Thomas, Earl of Thanet, in 1720, 
and is entitled to send candidates for one of Lady 
Elizabeth Hastings' exhibitions to the same college. 
Dr. Bedel, Bishop of Kilmore ; Dr. Barlow, Bishop of 
Lincoln ; Drs. Smith and Waugh, Bishops of Carlisle ; 
and Dr. Langhorne, the translator of Plutarch, were 
educated in the school. Other schools on the national plan 
have also been established ; and there is an endowment 
in land, producing about 7 per annum, which is ap- 
plied in aid of a school in the township of Murton, 
called Thwaite school. St. Ann's hospital, for 13 aged 
widows, was founded and endowed in 1653, by Anne, 
Countess of Pembroke ; the revenue arising from lands 
is about 490, and it has a considerable funded pro- 
perty. The building, which is quadrangular, comprises 
13 distinct habitations and a neat chapel ; the chaplain 
and sisters are appointed by the Earl of Thanet, as heir 
of the Countess, who left also various lands at Temple- 
Sowerby, in this parish, for repairing the church, school- 
house, town-hall, and bridge. In the neighbourhood 
were two ancient hospitals for lepers, dedicated respec- 
tively to St. Leonard and St. Nicholas ; the estate of the 
latter was applied by the countess towards the endow- 
ment of her almshouse. There was also a chapel at the 
western end of the stone bridge of St. Lawrence ; and 
the ruins of another have been found at Chapel hill. 
About a mile north of the village of Crackenthorpe, on 
the ancient Roman way, was a Roman encampment ; 
and a little further to the north was discovered, on sink- 
ing the foundation of a new bridge, in 1838, between 
the parish of St. Michael and Kirkby-Thore, a variety of 
Roman coins and other antiquities. At Machill bank, 
near the Roman way, urns have been found in circular 
pits of clay, apparently dug for their reception. Thomas 
de Appleby, Bishop of Carlisle, and Roger de Appleby, 
Bishop of Ossory, were natives of the town. 

APPLEDORE, a small sea- port town, in the parish 
of NORTHAM, union of BIDEFORD, hundred of SHEB- 
VOL. I. 65 



BEAR, Great Torrington and N. divisions of DEVON, 3 
miles (N.) from Bideford ; containing 2174 inhabitants. 
This spot is celebrated in history for the many battles 
between the Saxons and the Danes which took place in 
the immediate vicinity, more especially for the decisive 
and important victory obtained, by Earl Odun and the 
men of Devon, over a large army of Danes under the 
command of Hubba, who, in the reign of Alfred, landed 
here with thirty-three ships. The invaders were re- 
pulsed with great slaughter and the loss of their leader, 
who, being taken prisoner, was beheaded on a hill in 
the neighbourhood, on which a stone has been erected 
to' mark the spot, and which still retains the name of 
Hubberstone hill. The town is pleasantly situated on 
the shore of Barnstaple bay, and, from its facilities for 
sea-bathing, the mildness of its climate, and the ro- 
mantic beauty and variety of the surrounding scenery, has 
been gradually growing into importance as a favourite 
watering-place. The beach, which is from two to three 
miles in length, is a firm level sand, affording an excel- 
lent promenade ; and there are some agreeable walks 
and rides in the vicinity. The streets are for the greater 
part narrow and inconvenient, but, leading down to the 
beach, they are ventilated by a current of pure air ; and 
the atmosphere, impregnated with saline particles from 
the sea, and softened by the adjacent hills, is considered 
very favourable for invalids. The market is well sup- 
plied with fish, and with every other kind of provisions. 
The Burrows, a fine tract of land, on which every in- 
habitant householder has the right of common, is de- 
fended from the sea by an embankment called Pebble- 
ridge, which is nearly two miles in length, 150 feet broad 
at the base, and considerably higher than high-water 
mark. The parish church at Northam, being about a 
mile and a half distant, a chapel of ease has been lately 
erected here by subscription, containing 550 sittings, of 
which 275 are free. There is a place of worship for In- 
dependents, and there was formerly a Roman Catholic 
chapel. 

APPLEDORE (ST. PJST&R AND ST. PAUL), a parish, 
in the union of TENTERDEN, partly in the liberties of 
ROMNEY MARSH, but chiefly in the hundred of BLACK- 
BOURNE, lathe of SCRAY, W. division of KENT, 6 miles 
(S. E. by S.) from Tenterden ; containing 561 inhabit- 
ants. Some trade is carried on in coal, timber, and 
other merchandise, by means of the Royal Military 
canal, which passes close to the village. The living is a 
vicarage, with Ebony annexed, valued in the king's 
books at 21 ; net income, 185; patron and appro- 
priator, Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is a 
spacious edifice, in various styles, with a Norman tower, 
which appears to have formed part of the ancient castle, 
on the site of which the church is built. There is a 
place of worship for Wesleyans. 

APPLEDRAM (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
WEST HAMPNETT, hundred of Box and STOCKBRIDGE, 
rape of CHICHESTER, W. division of SUSSEX, l|- mile 
(S. W.) from Chichester ; containing 156 inhabitants. 
It is bounded on the west by the harbour of Chichester, 
and is of very small extent. Considerable business is 
done in the timber and coal trade at Dell Quay harbour. 
The manor-house, crowned with turrets, and surrounded 
by a moat, is a good specimen of the style of domestic 
architecture of the reign of Henry VIII. : near it are the 
remains of another ancient house, now occupied by a 

K 



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farmer. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the 
king's books at 14; net income, 34; patrons and 
appropriators, Dean and Chapter of Chichester. The 
church is in the early English style. 

APPLEFORD, a chapelry, in the parish of SUTTON- 
COURTNEY, union of ABINGDON, hundred of OCR, 
county of BERKS, 3| miles (S. E.) from Abingdon ; con- 
taining 187 inhabitants, and comprising 820 acres. The 
chapel is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul. The 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 344. 10., 
payable to the Dean and Canons of Windsor. A free 
school was founded and endowed by Edmund Brad- 
stock, for the education of twenty poor children, seven 
from the chapelry of Appleford, and the remainder from 
the parish of Sutton. 

APPLESHAW, a parish, in the union and hundred 
of ANDOVER, Andover and N. divisions of the county of 
SOUTHAMPTON, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Andover ; 
containing 372 inhabitants. Fairs for the sale of sheep 
are held on May 23rd, Oct. 9th, and Nov. 4th and 5th. 
The living is annexed to the vicarage of Amport : the 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 206. 
The church, erected in 1832 at an expense of 1300, is 
a neat edifice, containing 270 sittings, of which 86 are 
free. There is a school with a small endowment. 

APPLESTHORPE, or APESTHORPE (ST. PETER), 
a parish, in the union of EAST RETFORD, North-Clay 
division of the wapentake of BASSETLAW, N. division of 
the county of NOTTINGHAM, 5 miles (N. by E.) from 
East Retford ; containing 109 inhabitants. It com- 
prises 783a. 3r. 2/p., and is bounded on the east by the 
river Trent ; the surface is flat, and the soil a stiffish 
clay ; the land is rich meadow, near the Trent. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 81 ; patron, 
Prebendary of Apesthorpe in the Cathedral of York. 
The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure 
act, in 1795. The church has been more than a century 
in ruins, and the inhabitants therefore attend that at 
North Leverton : there is, however, a burial-ground, 
which was inclosed in 1833. 

APPLETHWAITE, a township, in the parish of 
WINDERMERE, union and ward of KENDAL, county of 
WESTMORLAND, 5^ miles (S. E.) from Ambleside ; con- 
taining 436 inhabitants. In the township are several 
beautiful villas, among which is Calgarth park, com- 
menced in 1789 by Dr. Watson, Bishop of Llandaff, 
who occupied it till his death in 1816, when his remains 
were interred at Bowness. Two bobbin-mills afford 
employment to a portion of the population. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 27. 

APPLETON (ST. LAWRENCE), a parish, in the union 
of ABINGDON, hundred of OCK, county of BERKS, 5| 
miles (N. W.) from Abingdon ; comprising 1981a. 2p., 
and containing, with the township of Eaton, 496 in- 
habitants. It is bounded on the north-west by the river 
Thames, which separates it from the county of Oxford, 
and on the south-east by a small stream called the Ouse. 
The surface undulates gently from the banks of the 
Thames, and the scenery is pleasingly diversified ; the 
soil near the river is of a clayey quality, and in the more 
elevated lands a rich and fertile loam. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 13. 5., and in 
the gift of Magdalene College : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 455, and the glebe com- 
prises 32 acres. The church contains a few monuments 
66 



to the Fettiplace family. A school was endowed with 
about 8 acres of land by Sir R. Fettiplace and other 
benefactors. There are some remains of two ancient 
manor-houses, each surrounded by a moat. Dr. Ed- 
mund Dickinson, author of a work entitled Delphi 
Phrenicizantes, tracing to the Bible the origin of the 
heathen mythology, was born here in 1624. 

APPLETON, with HULL, a township, in the parish 
of GREAT BUDWORTH, union of RUNCORN, hundred of 
BUCKLOW, N. division of the county of CHESTER, 4^ 
miles (S. S. E.) from Warrington 3 containing 1753 
inhabitants. 

APPLETON, with WIDNESS, a township, in the 
union and parish of PRESCOT, hundred of WEST DERBY, 
S. division of the county of LANCASTER, 6f miles (W. 
by S.) from Warrington. The navigable river Mersey 
runs on the south. There are places of worship for 
Wesleyans and Roman Catholics. 

APPLETON (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of FREEBRIDGE-LYNN, W. division of NOR- 
FOLK, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Lynn ; comprising 
8760. Ir. 1p., of which 508 are arable ; and containing 
25 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 8 ; patron, I. Motteux, 
Esq. : the irnpropriate tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 10, and the vicarial for 8. The church 
has fallen into ruins. 

APPLETON, a township, in the parish of CATTE- 
RICK, union of RICHMOND, wapentake of HANG-EAST, 
N. riding of YORK, 2 miles (S. by W.) from Catterick ; 
containing 91 inhabitants. It comprises about 1480 
acres, and includes the small hamlets of East and West 
Appleton. 

APPLETON-LE-MOORS, a township, in the parish 
of LASTINGHAM, union of PICKERING, wapentake of 
RYEDALE, N. riding of YORK, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from 
Kirkby-Moorside ; containing 322 inhabitants. It com- 
prises about 2570 acres, of which nearly 1300 are open 
moorland : the river Seven passes on the east, and the 
road from Kirkby-Moorside to Pickering on the south. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John 
Stockton, in 1839, left 10 a year for the instruction 
of children. 

APPLETON-LE-STREET (ALL SXINTS), a parish, 
in the union of MALTON, wapentake of RYEDALE, N. 
riding of YORK ; comprising the townships of Amother- 
by, Appleton-le-Street, Broughton, Hildenley, and Swin- 
ton; and containing 944 inhabitants, of whom 185 are 
in the township of Appleton-le-Street, 3f miles (W. N. 
W.) from New Malton. This parish, which is bounded 
on the north by the river Rye, is situated on the road 
to Thirsk ; the surface is undulated, and the scenery 
richly diversified ; limestone of excellent quality is 
abundant, and extensively quarried. The living is a 
vicarage, with the chapel of Amotherby, valued in the 
king's books at 7. 8. 6|. ; net income, 515$ patron 
and incumbent, Rev. J. J. Cleaver ; impropriators, the 
Earl of Carlisle, F. Cresswell, Esq., and others. The 
church is in the Norman style, with a square tower. 

APPLETON-ROEBUCK and NUN-APPLETON, a 
township, in the parish of BOLTON-PERCY, W. division 
of AINSTY wapentake, W. riding of YORK, 7| miles 
(S. S. W.) from York ; containing 564 inhabitants. This 
place comprises by computation 2800 acres, chiefly the 
property of the Milner family, whose splendid mansion, 



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Nun-Appleton Hall, stands in an extensive and finely 
wooded park, near the confluence of the rivers Ouse and 
Wharfe, and was built by Thomas, Lord Fairfax, on the 
site of a Cistercian priory for nuns, founded by Alice de 
St. Quintin at the commencement of the thirteenth cen- 
tury, and suppressed at the dissolution. The village is 
situated in the vale of a rivulet, and contains several 
dwelling-houses. There is a place of worship for Wes- 
leyans ; and a national school, built by subscription in 
1817, is supported by the rector and Sir William M. S. 
Milner, Bart. 

APPLETON-UPON-WISK, a parish, in the union 
of NORTH-ALLERTON, W. division of the liberty of 
LANGBAURGH, N. riding of YORK, 7 miles (S. S. W.) 
from Yarm ; containing 600 inhabitants. The manor, 
at the time of the Domesday survey, was in the hands 
of the Conqueror, and was then styled Apeltune : it was 
afterwards granted by that monarch to Robert de Brus, 
lord of Skelton, who gave it to the abbey of St. Mary 
at York ; and with that institution it continued till the 
dissolution, when it was bestowed by Henry VIII. upon 
Sir Charles Brandon, Knt. The parish, which is bounded 
on the south by the river Wisk, is about two miles in 
length from east to west, and a mile and a half broad, 
and comprises 1827. 2r. 25ju., of which 1101 acres are 
arable, 666 grass land, 27 wood, and 32 cottages, gar- 
dens, roads, and waste ; the soil is a strong clay, and 
the fields, which adjoining the river are low, rise from it 
by a gradual and easy ascent towards the north. The 
manufacture of linen is carried on to a considerable ex- 
tent, and affords employment to about 100 of the inha- 
bitants. The village is situated at the southern extre- 
mity of the parish, in the most westerly part of Cleveland, 
and is intersected by the roads between Richmond and 
Stokesley and North-Allerton and Yarm. The living is 
annexed to the rectory of Great Smeaton ; net income, 
exclusively of Great Smeaton, 185 ; impropriator, 
Rev. J. Hewgill. The church is a small ancient build- 
ing. There are places of worship for Independents, 
Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans ; and three small 
schools are partly supported by the parents of the chil- 
dren, and partly by subscription. 

APPLETREE, a hamlet, in the parish of ASTON- 
LE-WALLS, union of BANBURY, hundred of CHIPPING- 
WARDEN, S. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 
7 miles (N. N. E.) from Banbury ; containing 92 inha- 
bitants, and comprising 526a. 30jo, It is situated on the 
borders of Oxfordshire, which bounds it on the south- 
west. 

APPLETREE-WICK, a township, in the parish of 
BURNSALL, union of SKIPTON, E. division of the wapen- 
take of STAINCI.IFFE and EWCROSS, W. riding of YORK, 
9 miles (N. E. by N.) from Skipton ; containing 467 inha- 
bitants. This township, which forms the eastern side 
of Wharfdale, and includes the hamlets of Gateup and 
Skireholm, comprises by computation 7740 acres, chiefly 
the property of the Earl of Craven, and W. H. F. Caven- 
dish, and John Yorke, Esqrs., which last is lord of the 
manor : the lands are chiefly a high moorland district 
affording tolerable pasture. The village is pleasantly 
situated ; and a fair for horses and cattle is held annu- 
ally on the 25th of Oct. under a charter granted in the 
reign of Edward III. Christ-church in Skireholm was 
erected in 1837 by subscription, at a cost of 240, as a 
chapel of ease to the mother church : it is a neat small 
67 



edifice. William Craven, lord mayor of London in 
1611, and whose son was created Baron Craven in the 
2nd, and Earl of Craven in the 16th, of Charles II., an- 
cestor of the present earl, was a native of this place. 

ARBORFIELD (ST. BARTHOLOMEW), a parish, in 
the union of WOKTNGH AM, hundred of SONNING, county 
of BERKS, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Reading ; com- 
prising 1468a. 2r. 25p., and containing 300 inhabitants. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
8, and in the gift of Lord Braybrooke : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 398. A school is 
supported by subscription. The village of Arborfield 
Cross, about a mile from the church, is partly in this 
parish, and partly in that of Hurst. 

ARBURY, with HOUGHTON and MIDDLETON, a 
township, in the parish of WINWICK, union of WAR- 
RINGTON, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of the 
county of LANCASTER, 2^ miles (N. by E.) from War- 
rington. 

ARCLEBY, a hamlet, in the parish of PLUMBLAND, 
union of COCKERMOUTH, ALLERDALE ward below Der- 
went, W. division of CUMBERLAND, 7 miles (N. N. E.) 
from Cockermouth. There are some coal-works in the 
vicinity. 

ARCLID, a township, in the parish of SANDBACH, 
union of CONGLETON, hundred of NORTHWICH, S. divi- 
sion of the county of CHESTER, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from 
Sandbach : containing 121 inhabitants. The impro- 
priate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
29. 0. 6., and the vicarial for one of 39. 3. 8. 

ARDEN, with ARDENSIDE, a township, in the parish 
of HAWNB\, union of HELMSLEY, wapentake of BIRD- 
FORTH, N. riding of YORK, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) from 
Helmsley ; containing 137 inhabitants. A small Bene- 
dictine nunnery in connexion with Rivaulx abbey, about 
four miles distant, was founded here about 1150, the 
revenue of which, at the dissolution, was 12: Arden 
Hall is built upon its site. In 1757, John Smales and 
Gregory Elsley bequeathed 120. 5., directing the 
produce to be applied to the instruction of six poor boys. 

ARDINGLEY, or ERTHINGLEY, a parish, in the 
union of CUCKFIELD, hundred of BUTTINGHILL, rape of 
LEWES, E. division of SUSSEX, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) 
from Cuckfield ; containing 742 inhabitants. It is situ- 
ated on the road to Brighton through Linfield, and is 
intersected by the London and Brighton railway. In 
the hamlet of Hepsted Green a pleasure fair is held on 
the 30th of May. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 19. 5. 10.; net income, 498; 
patron, J. W. Peyton, Esq. The church is a handsome 
structure, in the decorated English style, and contains 
several ancient monuments to the Culpepper family. 

ARDINGTON (THE HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of WANTAGE, county of BERKS, 2f 
miles (E.) from Wantage ; containing 405 inhabitants. 
It contains by computation 2190 acres, and is intersected 
by the Wilts and Berks canal : the surface is flat, except 
at the northern extremity, which contains a portion of 
the chalk hills extending through this county and Wilt- 
shire. The northern part has some good meadow lands, 
and the middle is a rich loam well adapted for corn. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 8. 7- 9-, and in the patronage of the Dean 
and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford : the church has 
a narrow south aisle divided from the nave by pointed 

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arches, and at the east end a small transept. There are 
two schools. The Roman Ikeneld-street passed through 
the parish. 

ARDLEIGH (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of TENDRING, N. division of ESSEX, 4|- miles 
(N. E.) from Colchester ; containing 1605 inhabitants. 
The parish, which comprises 4953 acres, is situated on 
the road from Colchester to Harwich, and a fair is held 
on Sept. 29th. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 11. 0. 10., and in the 
patronage of the Crown ; net income, 258 ; appro- 
priator, Archdeacon of Colchester. The church is an 
ancient structure, partly rebuilt of brick, with the origi- 
nal square embattled tower of stone. There is a place 
of worship for Wesleyans. In 1571 William Littlebury 
bequeathed a farm called Wrabnass, now let for 250 
per annum, for the instruction of boys of Ardleigh, 
Dedham, and other places adjacent. 

ARDLEY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BICESTER, hundred of PLOUGHLEY, county of OXFORD, 
4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Bicester ; containing 168 
inhabitants. It contains by measurement 1469 acres, 
and is situated on the road from Oxford to Northamp- 
ton. Lace is manufactured here. The living is a rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 5. 12. 8^., and in 
the gift of the Duke of Marlborough : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 283, and the 
glebe comprises 60 acres. The main body of the church 
was rebuilt in a plain style about fifty years since. In 
Ardley wood are the foundations of an ancient castle, 
built by the Normans, in the reign of Stephen, on the 
site of a fortification which had been raised by Offa, 
King of Mercia : they are nearly circular, and comprise 
an area about sixty yards in diameter, surrounded by 
a moat. 

ARDSLEY, a township and chapelry, in the parish 
of DARFIELD, wapentake of STAINCROSS, W. riding of 
YORK, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Barnsley ; containing 
1226 inhabitants. Hand-loom weaving of linen, and 
the manufacture of fancy drills, are carried on here : a 
coal-pit is in operation, and there is a valuable stone- 
quarry from which grindstones of a very superior quality 
are supplied to the Sheffield and Birmingham manufac- 
turer?. The Dearne and Dove canal runs through the 
township. The church, dedicated to Christ, a cruciform 
structure in the Norman style, was erected in 1841, on 
a site given by Sir George Wombwell, Bart., at an ex- 
pense of 1200, of which 400 were contributed by the 
lord of the manor, 200 by the Incorporated Society, 
120 by the vicar of Darfield, and the rest by private 
individuals : it contains 500 sittings, one-third of which 
are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, at present en- 
dowed with 50 per annum by the Pastoral Aid Society j 
George Maude, Esq. has also contributed towards the 
endowment, and the remainder is supplied by the vicar 
of Darfield, who is patron : a parsonage-house has 
been lately built. The tithes have been commuted for 
rent-charges amounting to 203. I. 8., half of which is 
payable to Trinity College, Cambridge, and half to the 
Rector. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The 
sum of 50, bequeathed by John Micklethwaite in 1742, 
has been applied in erecting a house for the residence of 
a schoolmaster, in consideration of which he teaches 
two children gratuitously ; and a new school-house has 
been completed in connexion with the church. 
68 



ARDSLEY, EAST, a parish, in the union of WAKE- 
FIELD, Lower division of the wapentake of AGBRIGG, 
W. riding of YORK, 3^ miles (N. W. by N.) from Wake- 
field ; containing 900 inhabitants. This parish, which 
is in the honour of Pontefract, comprises about 1600 acres 
of fertile land : B. Dealtry, Esq. is lord of the manor. 
The village is situated on the road to Bradford, and the 
surrounding scenery is pleasing : there are extensive 
coal-mines. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net in- 
come, 369 ; patron and impropriator, Earl of Cardigan. 
The tithes for East and West Ardsley were commuted 
for land, under an inclosure act, in 189.6. The church is 
a small edifice, with a square tower. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans. A school is partly supported 
by a small endowment, and there are some bequests for 
distribution among the poor. 

ARDSLEY, WEST (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of WAKEFIELD, Lower division of the wapentake of 
AGBRIGG, W. riding of YORK, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from 
Leeds ; containing 1420 inhabitants. This place, in 
some documents called Woodkirk, from its ancient 
church of wood, formerly belonged to Nostal priory, 
subordinate to which was a cell of Black Canons 
founded here, and endowed with land by one of the 
family of the Soothills, in expiation of the murder of a 
child : its revenue at the dissolution amounted to 17, 
and the foundations of the building may still be traced. 
The parish comprises by measurement 2300 acres of 
fertile land : the substratum abounds with coal of ex- 
cellent quality, of which there are some extensive mines 
in operation. Tingley House is the handsome residence 
of George Ellis, Esq. : the village is pleasantly situated, 
and the surrounding scenery pleasingly diversified. Fairs 
for horses, &c. are held on Aug. 24th and Sept. 17th. 
The living is a perpetual curacy j net income, 265, 
derived from land ; patron and impropriator, the Earl of 
Cardigan, who is lord of the manor. The church, an 
ancient structure in the early English style, having 
fallen into dilapidation, was partly rebuilt in 1832, and 
the chancel in 1834; the ancient stalls and monuments 
have been preserved in the present structure, and among 
the latter is a monument to Sir John Topclifle, chief 
justice and master of the mint in the reigns of Henry 
VII. and VIII., who resided at Topcliffe Hall, now a 
farm-house. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. 
There is a small bequest by Mr. Joshua Scholeficld for 
the instruction of children ; and some trifling benefac- 
tions have been left for distribution among the poor. 

ARDWICK, a chapelry, in the parish of MANCHES- 
TER, union of CHORLTON, hundred of SALFORD, S. 
division of the county of LANCASTER, 1 mile (S. E. 
by E.) from Manchester ; containing 9906 inhabitants. 
Owing to its proximity to Manchester, Ardwick parti- 
cipates extensively in the trade of that place. The living 
is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 294 ; patrons and 
appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Manchester. 
The chapel is dedicated to St. Thomas. There is a place 
of worship for Wesleyans. 

ARELEY- KING'S, or LOWER ARELEY (Sr. BAR- 
THOLOMEW), a. parish, in the union of MARTLEY, Upper 
division of the hundred of DODDINGTRKE, the Hundred- 
House and W. divisions of the county of WORCESTER, 
\ a mile (S. W. by W.) from Stourport ; containing 423 
inhabitants. It comprises 1449 acres by a late admea- 
surement, and is separated from Stourport by the river 



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Severn. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 9, and in the patronage of the Rector of 
Hartley : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 358, and there is a glebe of 41 acres, with a 
house. The church is situated on a considerable emi- 
nence commanding a fine prospect, and nearly over- 
hanging the river, which flows through a rich valley at 
the base. In the burial-ground is a singular sepulchral 
monument, of the date of about 1690, supposed to com- 
memorate Sir Harry Coningsby, of Hampton Court, 
who lived in seclusion in this parish, in consequence of 
the loss of his only child. Here is a national school ; 
and an estate of the value of 16 per annum, given by 
Wm. Stevens in 1653, is vested in trustees, for the 
repair and maintenance of the church. 

ARELEY, UPPER (Sr. PETER), a parish, in the 
union of KIDDERMINSTER, S. division of the hundred 
of SEISDON and of the county of STAFFORD, 5^ miles 
(N. W. by W.) from Kidderminster; containing 667 in- 
habitants. The village occupies a romantic situation 
near the margin of the river Severn, and the parish 
comprises 3803a. 3r. 12p. : a thin stratum of coal is 
worked, and there are quarries of red freestone, of which 
large blocks are raised for building, and which is also 
used for grindstones and millstones. Areley Hall is the 
residence of the Earl of Mountnorris, who, when Viscount 
Valentia, published his interesting travels in the east. 
The living is a perpetual curacy ; patron and impro- 
priator, Lord Mountnorris. The great tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 391. 7 '., and those of 
the incumbent for 305 : the impropriate glebe consists 
of 199 acres ; the glebe belonging to the incumbent con- 
tains only about a quarter of an acre, on which the 
glebe-house stands. The church is situated on an emi- 
nence commanding a fine prospect. A school is sup- 
ported by subscription. 

ARGAM, or ERGHAM (Sr. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a 
parish, in the union of BRIDLINGTON, wapentake of 
DICKERING, E. riding of YORK, 5^ miles (N. W.) from 
Bridlington ; containing 30 inhabitants. The parish is 
situated near the road leading from Bridlington to Mai- 
ton, and comprises by computation 510 acres of land, 
occupied in farms. The living is a discharged rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 4, and in the patronage of 
C. Grimston, Esq., with a net income of 21. The church 
was one of the chapels of Hunmanby, until it was appro- 
priated to the abbey of Bardensey ; but few traces of 
it now remain. 

ARKENDALE, a chapelry, in the parish of KNARES- 
BOROTJGH, Lower division of the wapentake of CLARO, 
W. riding of YORK, 4 miles (N. E.) from Knares- 
borough ; containing 261 inhabitants. This place com- 
prises 15l6a. 2r. 35p., of which more than two-thirds 
are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with 
about 4^ acres of wood ; the soil is partly sand, but 
mostly clay, producing good crops of wheat, barley, 
oats, and turnips ; the surface is hilly, arid varied and 
picturesque, the higher grounds commanding extensive 
views. The village is situated at the distance of a mile 
from the Boroughbridge and Wetherby, and the Borough- 
bridge and Knaresborough roads. The living is a per- 
petual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Knares- 
borough, with a net income of 90 : the tithes for the 
manor were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, 
iu 1/73, and a rent-charge of 107 has been lately 
69 



awarded as a commutation for the impropriate tithes. 
The church, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, was rebuilt 
in 1836, at a cost of about 750, raised by subscription, 
aided by a grant of 100 from the Incorporated Society: 
it is a handsome edifice of white brick and stone, in the 
early English style, with a square embattled tower, and 
contains 210 sittings, of which 144 are free. A parson- 
age-house, pleasantly situated on an eminence, was built 
in 1841, at an expense of 544, also raised by subscrip- 
tion, aided by a grant of 200 from the Ripon Diocesan 
Society. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A 
day school for boys, and a Sunday school for children 
of 'both sexes, are supported by subscription. 

ARKENGARTH - DALE, or ARKENDALE (Sx. 
MARY), a parish, in the union of RICHMOND, wapen- 
take of GILLING-WEST, N. riding of YORK, 12 miles 
(W. by N.) from Richmond ; containing 1243 inhabit- 
ants. This is a large moorland parish, the most in- 
teresting part of which is its picturesque dale, about 
eight miles long, arid beautifully studded with rural 
hamlets, whereof the principal are Arkle, Booze, Eskey- 
lith, Langthwaite, Whaw, Seal-houses, and Dale-head : 
it comprises by computation 14,256 acres, of which 
3200 are pasture and meadow, 5 arable, 51 wood, 50 
public roads, and 10,950 common land. The district 
abounds in lead-ore, lying principally in high and bleak 
moors, in the vicinity of the Arkle rivulet, on whose 
south side the mountain called Water Crag rises 2186 
feet above the level of the sea : these lead-mines are of 
great antiquity, some of them having been worked in 
the reign of King John, and they are still very produc- 
tive. There are also extensive smelting-works, where 
more than 1000 tons of lead are made into ingots yearly; 
and two excellent slate-quarries are in operation. The 
road leading from Reeth, in Swaledale, to Kirkby-Ste- 
phen and Brough, in Westmorland, passes through the 
whole length of the parish. 

The LIVING is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of 
Sir John Lowther, Bart., the impropriator, with a net 
income of 123. The present church, built in 1818, 
stands about half a mile from the site of the old edifice, 
and is a small but neat stone structure capable of ac- 
commodating from 500 to 600 persons ; the cost of its 
erection, between 2000 and 3000, was defrayed, partly 
by money bequeathed by the late George Brown, Esq., 
lord of the manor, and partly by the Rev. John Gilpin, 
the present lord. A neat parsonage-house was built in 
1838, by subscription, aided by 200 Queen Anne's 
Bounty, and a contribution from Sir John Lowther of 
100. At Langthwaite are places of worship for Primi- 
tive Methodists and Wesleyans. George Brown, Esq., 
in 1813, built a free school, of which the master has a 
salary of 60, including 16 per annum bequeathed by 
John Bathurst, Esq. M.D., in 1659, with a house and 
garden, and a small plot of land rent-free. Dr. 
Bathurst also left 12 per annum for the instruction of 
children in the manor of New Forest, for which the 
school at Helwith, in that district, is now kept ; and 
two sums, each of 4 per annum, for apprenticing chil- 
dren of that place and Arkengarth-dale. 

ARKESDEN (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
SAFFRON- WALDEN, hundred of UTTLESFORD, N. divi- 
sion of ESSEX, 3 miles (E.) from Newport, and 9 miles 
(N.) from Bishop Stortford ; containing 498 inhabitants. 
It comprises 2297a. 2r. 28/>., of which the surface is 



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undulated, and the soil a heavy and tenacious clay ; the 
scenery is varied, and the adjacent country of interest- 
ing aspect. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 13. 6. 8. j net income, 181 ; 
patron and impropriator, R. B. Wolfe, Esq. It was 
formerly endowed with a portion of the great tithes, 
which were commuted for land and a corn-rent, under 
an inclosure act, in 1814. The church, a spacious and 
handsome structure with a square embattled tower, in 
the later English style, is finely situated on the slope of 
a hill ; the north aisle was built by Thomas Alderton, 
of London, who founded a chantry here in the reign of 
Henry VII. There is a school supported by subscrip- 
tion. 

ARKHOLME, with CAWOOD, a chapelry, in the 
parish of MELLING, union of LANCASTER, hundred of 
LONSDALE, south of the Sands, N. division of the county 
of LANCASTER, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Kirkby-Lons- 
dale j containing 407 inhabitants. It comprises 2*56 
acres, of which 2466 are meadow and pasture, 160 
arable, and 130 waste, forest, &c. The living is a per- 
petual curacy j net income, 51; patron, Vicar of 
Melling. 

ARKLESIDE, a hamlet, in the township of CARL- 
TON-HIGHDALE, parish of COVERHAM, union of LEY- 
BURN, wapentake of HANG-WEST, N. riding of YORK, 
8 miles (S. W.) from Middleham. It is chiefly the pro- 
perty of M. Errington, Esq., and the tithes belong to 
the incumbent of Coverharn, the monks of which place 
had lands here, producing 6. 13. 4. per annum. 

ARKSEY (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
DONCASTER, N. division of the wapentake of STRAF- 
FORTH, and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, 3 miles 
(N. by E.) from Doncaster; containing 1056 inhabit- 
ants, of whom 266 are in the hamlet of Arksey, and 697 
in that of Bentley. The parish comprises the hamlets 
of Stockbridge, Almholm, Shaftholme, Bodies, Doncas- 
ter, Bridge-End, and Scawthorpe ; and consists of about 
5220 acres of fertile land in a champaign district of rich 
loam : it is bounded on the east by the river Don, and 
watered by two of its tributary streams. The living is 
a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 12. 17. 6., 
and in the patronage of Sir William Bryan Cooke, Bart., 
the impropriator, with a net income of 1 13 : the tithes 
were commuted for land and a money payment, under 
an inclosure act, in the 7th and 8th of George IV. The 
church consists of a nave, chancel, side aisles, transepts, 
and a tower with a low spire rising from the centre : 
the interior is rich in heraldic insignia, and the windows 
have much stained glass in good preservation. The free 
grammar school was built in pursuance of the will of 
Sir George Cooke, and has an endowment of 40 per 
annum, left by Sir Bryan Cooke in 1660. Analmshouse 
for 12 poor inhabitants is endowed with 120 per 
annum. 

ARLECDON (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of WHITEHAVEN, ALLERDALE ward above Derwent, 
W. division of CUMBERLAND, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from 
Whitehaven ; consisting of the townships of Arlecdon, 
Frizington, and Whillymoor, and containing 558 in- 
habitants, of whom 211 are in Arlecdon township. It 
comprises 53 11 a. 3r. 15/>., and possesses coal, iron-ore, 
limestone, and freestone. Fairs for cattle are on April 
24th, the first Friday in June, and Sept. 17th. The 
living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the 
70 



bishop of the diocese, to whom also the impropriation 
belongs ; net income, 94. The tithes for the township 
of Arlecdon were commuted for land, under an inclo- 
sure act, in 181Q. The church has been rebuilt, and 
was consecrated Aug. 25th, 1829} and divine service is 
also performed in a Sunday school, lately erected, which 
is licensed by the bishop. On an estate called Cringle- 
gill is a chalybeate spring, the water of which is stated 
to possess similar properties to that of Harrogate. 

ARLESCOTE, a township, in the parish of WAR- 
MINGTON, union of BANBURY, Burton-Dasset division 
of the hundred of KINGTON, S. division of the county 
of WARWICK, 5^ miles (E. S. E.) from Kington j con- 
taining 43 inhabitants. 

ARLESTON, with SYNFIN, a liberty, in the parish 
of BARROW, union of SHARDLOW, hundred of APPLE- 
TREE, though locally in the hundred of REPTON and 
GRESLEY, S. division of the county of DERBY, 4^ 
miles (S. by W.) from Derby ; containing 85 inhabit- 
ants. 

ARLESTON, a hamlet, in the parish and union of 
WELLINGTON, hundred of SOUTH BRADFORD, N. divi- 
sion of SALOP ; containing 181 inhabitants. 

ARLEY (ST. WILFRID), a parish, in the union of 
NUNEATON, Kirby division of the hundred of KNIGHT- 
LOW, N. division of the county of WARWICK, 6 miles 
(E. by N.) from Coleshillj containing 265 inhabitants. 
It comprises 1929. 29/>., and is traversed by the road 
from Coventry to Tarnworth. Lime in considerable 
quantities, and stone for the roads, are obtained here. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
9. 0. 7^. ; patron and incumbent, Rev. R. R. Vaugh- 
ton : the tithes have been commuted for a rent -charge 
of 336. 8., and the glebe consists of 74 acres. A free 
school is endowed with land, producing 20 per annum, 
left by William Avery, and by 21 per annum from 
John and Francis Holmes. 

ARLINGHAM (ST. MARY THE VIRGIN), a parish, in 
the union of WHEATENHURST, Upper division of the 
hundred of BERKELEY, W. division of the county of 
GLOUCESTER, l mile (S. E. by E.) from Newnham ; 
containing 793 inhabitants. The parish is situated on 
a nook of land, formed by a curvature of the river 
Severn, by which it is bounded on three sides, and 
across which is a ferry to Newnham : from an eminence 
called Barrow hill is a very extensive and pleasing view. 
The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
19. 7. 3^., and in the patronage of Mrs. Hodges, to 
whom also the impropriation belongs ; net income, 
193. The tithes were commuted for land and corn- 
rents, by an inclosure act, in 1801. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans. Mrs. Mary Yate, in 1765, en- 
dowed a school for boys and girls with a rent-charge of 
40 ; she also gave an additional rent-charge of 40 for 
the benefit of the poor. 

ARLINGTON (Sr. JAMES), a parish, in the union 
of BARNSTAPLE, hundred of SHERWILL, Braunton and 
N. divisions of DEVON, 6% miles (N. E. by N.) from 
Barnstaple ; containing 206 inhabitants. The parish 
comprises 4000 acres, and is intersected by the river 
Yeo. Arlington Court, a spacious and handsome man- 
sion in the Grecian-Doric style, is situated here. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 13. 
18. l. ; net income, 272; patron, J. P. Chichester, 
Esq. The church, which has lately been rebuilt by the 



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patron, contains a beautiful monument in marble to 
one of the Carey family, and the figure of a female 
crowned. 

ARLINGTON, a tything, in the parish of BIBURY, 
union of NORTHLEACH, hundred of BRIGHTWELL'S-BAR- 
ROW, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 4f- miles 
(N. W.) from Fairford ; containing 371 inhabitants. 

ARLINGTON (ST. PANCRAS), a parish, in the union 
of HAILSHAM, hundred of LONGBRIDGE, rape of PE- 
VENSEY, E. division of SUSSEX, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from 
Hailsham ; containing 686 inhabitants. A priory of 
Black Canons was founded at Michelham, in this parish, 
in honour of the Holy Trinity, by Gilbert de Aquila, in 
the reign of Henry III., which continued to flourish till 
the dissolution, when its revenue was estimated at 191. 
19- 3. j the remains have been converted into a farm- 
house, on the north side of which are various pillars and 
arches, still in tolerable preservation. The parish com- 
prises 5100 acres by admeasurement. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
10. 6. 11. ; net income, 156 , patron, the Prebendary 
of Woodhorne in the Cathedral of Chichester ; impio- 
priator, Mrs. Attree. The church is an ancient struc- 
ture in the decorated English style. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans ; and a school is supported by 
subscription. In the hamlet of Milton is the site of 
Barlow Castle, overlooking the river Cuckmere. 

ARLSEY (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of BIGGLESWADE, county of BEDFORD, 6 miles 
(S.) from Biggleswade ; containing 820 inhabitants. 
This place is in the Domesday survey noticed as a 
market- town, and in 1270 Stephen Edworth, then lord 
of the manor, obtained a confirmation of the grant for 
its market, and a grant of a fair on the festival of St. 
Peter and St. Paul, both of which have been long dis- 
continued. The parish is bounded on the north by the 
river Ivel, and on the west by the Hiz, both of which 
unite in the north-west extremity j it is intersected by 
the road from Baldock to Bedford, and comprises by 
measurement 2303 acres, of which about 1600 are ara- 
ble, 500 pasture, 20 wood, and 50 common ; the sub-soil 
is gravel and clay. The women and children are em- 
ployed in the straw-plat manufacture. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, united in 1764 to the rectory of 
Astwick, valued in the king's books at 8 per annum ; 
it is in the patronage of Miss Dove. At the inclosure of 
the parish, 255 acres were allotted in lieu of tithes, and 
there are 15 acres of grass land round the glebe-house. 
The church is a neat edifice. There is a place of worship 
for Wesleyans. At Etonbury, near the road to Baldock, 
are the remains of a Roman encampment ; and a spot, 
still called the Hermitage, was the site of an ancient 
religious house. 

ARMATHWAITE, a chapelry, in the parish of HES- 

KET-IN-THE-FOREST, union of PENRITH, LEATH Ward, 

E. division of CUMBERLAND, 5 miles (N. W.) from 
Kirk-Oswald. The village is beautifully situated on the 
western bank of the Eden, over which is a good stone 
bridge of four arches. The castle, a handsome modern 
edifice, built on the site of an ancient fortress, occupies 
a rocky elevation, at the foot of which flows the Eden ; 
in the reign of Henry VIII. it was, with the estate, the 
property of John Skelton, the poet-laureat. The living 
is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 50 : patrons, the 
Trustees of Mr. Milbourne, in whom also the impro- 
. 71 



priation is vested. The chapel was rebuilt by Richard 
Skelton, Esq., in 1668, having for some time previously 
been used as a shed for cattle. 

ARMIN, a chapelry. in the parish of SNAITH, union 
of GOOLE, L. division of the wapentake of OSGOLD- 
CROSS, W. riding of YORK, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from 
Goole ; containing 593 inhabitants. This chapelry, the 
name of which signifies the " mouth of the Aire," is 
bounded on the north-west by that river, and is situated 
on the road from Doncaster to Hull. The living is a 
perpetual curacy; net income, 71 ; patrons, Earl of 
Beverley and N. E. Yarburgh, Esq. ; impropriator, Earl 
of Beverley. The chapel is dedicated to St. David. A 
very commodious Sunday school was erected by the Earl 
in 1834; and a school, in which 20 of the children are 
instructed gratuitously, is supported by the lord of the 
manor and principal inhabitants. 

ARMINGHALL (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of HENSTEAD, E. division of NORFOLK, 3 
miles (S. E. by S.) from Norwich ; comprising by com- 
putation 650 acres, and containing 79 inhabitants. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 66 ; patrons 
and appropriators, Dean and Chapter of Norwich, whose 
tithes have been commuted for 229. 10. The church 
is chiefly in the early English style, and consists of a 
nave and chancel, with a square tower. An old house 
near the church has a very rich and curious porch, on 
the door of which is written, in ancient characters, 
" Pray for the soul of Master William Ely, who caused 
this to be made an hospital in the year 1487." 

ARMITAGE (ST. JOHN), with HANDSACRE, a parish, 
in the union of LICHFIELD, S. division of the hun- 
dred of OFFLOW and of the county of STAFFORD, 3 
miles (E. S. E.) from Rugeley ; containing 987 inhabi- 
tants. This parish, which is intersected by the Grand 
Junction canal, and skirted by the river Trent, lies on 
the main road from Lichfield to Uttoxeter, in a beau- 
tiful and fertile part of the county exceedingly well 
wooded. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of 
the Bishop of Lichfield, with a net income of 91 : 
tithes belonging to the treasurer of Queen Anne's 
Bounty have been commuted for a rent-charge of 336 : 
the glebe comprises 1^ acre. The church is an old 
building, principally in the Norman style. There is a 
place of worship for Independents ; and a national 
school was established in 1833. 

ARMLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of ST. PETER, 
liberty of the borough of LEEDS, W. riding of YORK, 2^ 
miles (W. by N.) from Leeds ; containing 5676 inhabit- 
ants. This chapelry comprises 939- If. 18p. ; the soil 
is tolerably fertile, and excellent building stone abounds ; 
the surface is boldly undulated, and from the east side, 
looking towards Headingley, the scenery is picturesque. 
Armley House, the seat of John Gott, Esq., lord of the 
manor, is a noble mansion of the Ionic order, situated in 
an extensive and richly-wooded park. Wyther and 
Armley Grange are also pleasing residences. The old 
hall, anciently the residence of the Hoptons, lords of the 
manor, is now a farm-house ; and Cartleton Lodge, the 
seat of the late Benjamin Sadler, Esq., M. P., has been 
converted into a retreat for insane persons. The village 
is situated on the west side of the river Aire, and 
extends for a considerable distance along the acclivities 
of the vale. The Leeds and Liverpool canal passes in a 
direction nearly parallel with the river, and also the new 



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road from Stanningley to Leeds, completed in 1836. 
The inhabitants are employed in extensive woollen- 
mills. 

The chapel, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, originally 
erected in the reign of Charles I., was rebuilt in 1835, at 
an expense of 1000, of which 300 were granted by the 
Incorporated Society, and the remainder raised by sub- 
scription ; it contains 930 sittings, of which 300 are 
free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage 
of the Vicar of Leeds, with a net income of 204, and 
a glebe-house. A Sunday evening lecture was esta- 
blished in 1841, and is supported at the sole expense of 
Mr. Gott ; the lecturer has a liberal income, and a 
commodious house. There are places of worship for 
Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Methodists of the 
New Connexion. Almshouses for 12 poor widows, and 
a national school-room for 500 children, were erected 
near the chapel in 1832, by the late Benjamin Gott, 
Esq. ; they form a handsome range of buildings in the 
Elizabethan style. There is also a town's school, in con- 
nexion with the Established Church, the master of 
which receives 12. 6. per annum from land allotted at 
the iticlosure, for which he teaches six scholars gra- 
tuitously. Above the village is a lofty eminence, named 
Giant's hill, on which are the remains of some works, 
supposed to have been a Danish fort ; and there were 
also some others on two eminences, called the Red and 
White War hills, but which were destroyed in the for- 
mation of the canal. 

ARMSCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of NEWBOLD, 
union of SHIPSTON-TJPON-STOUR, Upper division of the 
hundred of OSWALDSLOW, Blockley and E. divisions of 
the county of WORCESTER, lying in a detached portion 
surrounded by Warwickshire, 3 miles (N. by W.) from 
Shipston ; containing 139 inhabitants. 

ARMSTON, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of 
POLEBROOK, \mion of OUNDLE, N. division of the 
county of NORTHAMPTON, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from 
Oundle ; containing 26 inhabitants, and comprising 784 
acres. It is situated near the right bank of the river 
Nene, and in the south-western part of the parish. 

ARMTHORPE (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
DONCASTER, S. division of the wapentake of STRAP- 
FORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, 4 miles (E. 
N. E.) from Doncaster ; containing, with the hamlet of 
Nutwell, 449 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday 
book called Ernulfestorp, was the property of the 
monks of the abbey of Roc-he, who had a grange here, at 
which the official resided who managed this part of the 
estates of that establishment, and who was sometimes a 
brother of the house : they had also an officer called 
their forester. The parish comprises 3810 acres, and 
includes the farms of Holm-Wood and Waterton, the 
latter of which was long the seat of the ancient family of 
its own name, of whom several served the office of high 
sheriff, and one was master of the horse to Henry V. 
The village consists of scattered houses, and is situated 
on a declivity. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 8. 18. 9., and is in the patronage of the 
Crown, with a net income of 366 : the tithes were 
commuted for land and a money payment, by an inclo- 
sure act, in 1775. The church is a small building, with 
an octagonal turret, and exhibits a good specimen of 
the original country churches for small parishes. The 
Primitive Methodists have a place of worship. Ann 
72 



Holmes, in 1 689, bequeathed a rent-charge of 2. 10. 
for teaching six children, and apprenticing boys, which 
endowment has been augmented by Sir George Cooke, 
Bart., and now produces 5. 13. per annum. 

ARNCLIFFE (ST. OSWALD), a parish, partly in the 
union of SKIPTON, and E. division of the wapentake of 
STAINCLIFFE and EWCROSS, but chiefly in the union of 
SETTLE, and W. division of that wapentake, W. riding 
of YORK, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Kettlewell ; com- 
prising the townships of Buckden, Hawkeswick, and 
Litton, and the chapelry of Halton-Gill ; and con- 
taining 834 inhabitants, of whom 182 are in the town- 
ship of Arncliffe. This parish consists by estimation of 
35,860 acres, nearly all in grass, including 5800 in 
Arncliffe township, and is bounded on the west by Pen- 
nygent, a mountain 2270 feet high, and on the north by 
Camm Fell, 2245 feet high. The district consists of two 
valleys, separated by an almost impassable mountain ; 
one of these, called Langstrothdale, is watered by the 
Wharfe, which noble river has its rise here ; and the 
other, called Littondale, by the Skirfare, which forms a 
junction with the Wharfe at the bottom of the valley. 
The air is for the greater part of the year piercing, 
owing to the vicinity of the high hills just mentioned, 
which being often capped with snow, render the winds 
cold and sharp. There is a cotton-mill in the village, 
but grazing forms the chief occupation of the inhabit- 
ants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 13. 6. 8.; net income, 50, with an 
excellent glebe-house ; patrons and appropriators, the 
Master and Fellows of University College, Oxford : the 
tithes have been commuted for 483. 7. 2. The church, 
with the exception of the tower, was taken down and 
rebuilt in 1805 ; the chancel has just been again rebuilt 
by subscription, and in the same style as the tower ; and 
several windows of that character have been inserted in 
the body of the edifice. At Halton-Gill and Hubber- 
holme are chapels of ease, the livings of which are in the 
patronage of the Vicar of Arncliffe. There are some 
small bequests, the interest of which is applied to the 
relief of the poor and the repair of the church ; and 13s. 
are annually paid for a sermon on the 5th of Nov., 
agreeably with the will of William Fawcett, dated 1 630. 

ARNCLIFFE-COTE, a hamlet, in the township and 
parish of ARNCLIFFE, union of SETTLE, W. division of 
the wapentake of STAINCLIFFE and EWCROSS, W. riding 
of YORK. This place is tithe-free, being named in 
a charter, 9th Richard II., as belonging to the monks 
of Fountains, in whose possession it was at the dis- 
solution. 

ARNCLIFFE, INGLEBY (ST. ANDREW), a parish, 
in the union of STOKESLEY, W. division of the liberty 
of LANGBAURGH, N. riding of YORK, 7 miles (S. W. by 
W.) from Stokesley ; containing 329 inhabitants. There 
appears, from Domesday book, to have been anciently 
two manors in the parish, Ingleby and Arncliffe, which 
after the Conquest were held by King William, when 
they were styled Engelebi and Erneclive : the estates 
were subsequently granted to Robert de Brus, as parcel 
of the barony of Skelton, to be held of the king in capite ; 
and among the families which have at different periods 
owned property here, occur those of Bruce, Fauconberge, 
Ingelram, Colville, and Mauleverer. The parish is in 
the district called Cleveland, and its greatest extent is 
three miles from east to west, and its breadth about two 



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miles; it comprises 1850 acres, of which about 1200 are 
arable, 300 woodland and plantations, and the remainder 
meadow and pasture ; the lands are chiefly the pro- 
perty of William Mauleverer, Esq., the descendant of the 
Norman baron who came over with the Conqueror from 
Normandy, and whose family have continued here since 
that period. The surface is undulated, and the high 
grounds command fine views of the vale of Cleveland, 
the distant hills of Richmond, and the sea; the hills are 
richly wooded, and the scenery in many parts is beauti- 
fully picturesque ; the soil is a strong clay ; and 
freestone of good quality is plentiful ; but as there is 
little demand, it is not wrought to any great extent. 
The village of Ingleby, the only one in the parish, is 
neatly built, and occupies a retired situation on the 
summit of a gentle ridge, at a short distance from the 
road between Stokesley and Thirsk. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Bryan Abbs, Esq., 
the impropriator, with a net income of 49 : the tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 125. The 
church is a neat plain structure with a campanile tur- 
ret, erected in 1822, at an expense of 500, raised by 
subscription. A small school is partly supported by 
voluntary contributions. 

ARNCOTT, a chapelry, in the parish of AMBROSDEN, 
union of BICESTER, hundred of BULLINGTON, though 
locally in the hundred of PLOUGHLEY, county of OX- 
FORD, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Bicester ; containing 
331 inhabitants. 

ARNE, a parochial chapelry, in the union of WARE- 
HAM and PURBECK, hundred of HASILOR, Wareham 
division of DORSET, 4 miles (E. by N.) from Wareham ; 
containing 168 inhabitants, and comprising 1068o. 2r. 
2 \p. The village is situated on the shore of Poole har- 
bour, between Wareham and Brownsey Island. On 
the summit of an eminence connected with a bank of 
gravel or pebbles, extending north-eastward into the 
harbour, is a large barrow, which was formerly used as 
a beacon. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the 
patronage of the Rector of Wareham. The chapel, 
dedicated to St. Nicholas, is a plain structure of ancient 
date. 

ARNESBY (Sr. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
LUTTERWORTH, hundred of GUTHLAXTON, S. division 
of the county of LEICESTER, 8 miles (S. by E.) from 
Leicester ; containing 505 inhabitants. It is situated 
on the road from Leicester to Welford, and comprises 
about 1250 acres, nearly all pasture; the soil is chiefly 
a clay of a strong quality. The population is principally 
employed in the stocking manufacture. The living is 
a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
5. 16. 8.3 patron, John Sherwin, Esq. : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 60, and the glebe 
comprises 25 acres. The church is a substantial edifice 
in good repair, containing about 400 sittings. There is 
a place of worship for Baptists. Two allotments of land, 
comprising together 165 acres, producing 50. 13. 9. 
per annum, are appropriated to the benefit of the poor. 
The Rev. Robert Hall, the distinguished theological 
writer, was born here in 1*64 ; the building in which 
he preached his first sermon is now a barn. 

ARNFORD-CUM-NEWTON, a hamlet, in the town- 
ship of HELLIFIELD, parish of LONG PRESTON, union of 
SETTLE, W. division of the wapentake of STAINCLIFFE 
and EWCROSS, W. riding of YORK. This place, of which 
VOL. I. 73 



mention is made in one of the oldest Craven charters, 
formerly belonged to the monks of Fountains, with 
whom it continued till the dissolution, when it became 
the property of the Greshams : it is now chiefly owned 
by Earl de Grey. 

ARNOLD (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BASFORD, N. division of the wapentake of BROXTOW 
and of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 4 miles (N. by E.) 
from Nottingham ; containing, with part of the hamlet 
of Daybrook, 4509 inhabitants. It comprises by ad- 
measurement 4349 acres, of which 2610 are arable, 1330 
meadow and pasture, 294 wood and plantation, and the 
remainder roads, waste, &c. ; the soil in the eastern 
part is clay, but elsewhere it is of a sandy nature. The 
village, which is remarkably healthy, and well supplied 
with water, is about three-quarters of a mile long, and a 
quarter broad, situated in the midst of the ancient forest 
of Sherwood, and surrounded by a beautifully undulated 
neighbourhood. The inhabitants are principally em- 
ployed in the manufacture of cotton hose, gloves, &c. ; 
and the cotton stockings made here are as fine as those 
produced at any other place in England. A small fair 
is held on the first Wednesday after Sept. 19th. The 
living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books 
at 7. 17. 8., and in the patronage of the Duke of 
Devonshire ; impropriator, T. Holdsworth, Esq. The 
small tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
210, and there are 90 acres of glebe. The church is. a 
large handsome edifice in the later English style, with a 
tower ; a tablet in the interior records various charitable 
bequests amounting to about 150 per annum. There 
are places of worship for Wesleyans, Wesleyans of the 
New Connexion, Baptists, and Independents ; and a 
Chartist meeting-house. A parochial school is endowed 
with 20 per annum. On Cockliff hill, the highest 
ground in the county, are the remains of a Roman en- 
campment. 

ARNOLD, a township, partly in the parish of LONG 
RISTON, and partly in that of SWINE, union of SKIR- 
LAUGH, N. division of the wapentake of HOLDERNESS, 
E. riding of YORK, 6 miles (E. N. E.) from Beverley; 
containing 154 inhabitants. This place, in the 13th 
century, belonged to the family of de Roos ; the Hild- 
yards afterwards held the lands for a considerable period, 
and among other proprietors occurs the abbot of Meaux. 
The township belongs, in nearly equal moieties, to the 
two parishes, and comprises by computation 2000 acres : 
the village, which is long and scattered, is situated to 
the north of the Lam with stream. There are places of 
worship for Independents and Primitive Methodists. 

ARNWOOD, a tything, in the parish of HORDLE, 
union of LYMINGTON, hundred of CHRISTCHURCH, Ly- 
mington and S. divisions of HAMPSHIRE ; containing 
543 inhabitants. 

ARRAM, a township, in the parish of LECKONFIELD, 
union of BEVERLEY, Hunsley-Beacon division of the 
wapentake of HARTHILL, E. riding of YORK, 3 miles 
(N. by E.) from Beverley ; containing 117 inhabitants. 
This is a long scattered village, situated to the east of 
Leckonfield, and near the right bank of the river Hull. 

ARRAM, with ATWICK and SKIRLINGTON, a town- 
ship, in the parish of ATWICK, union of SKIRLAUGH, 
N. division of the wapentake of HOLDERNESS, E. riding 
of YORK, ll miles (N. E.) from Beverley; containing 
50 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book styled 



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Argun, and in other records Ergham, came at an early 
period into the possession of Meaux abbey, to which in- 
stitution Sir Steven Ergham gave some land here about 
1190 : the canons of Bridlington also had some interest 
in the property. The manor comprises about 500 acres, 
tithe- free : the manor-house, a neat residence, was built 
about the time of James I., but has been much modern- 
ised. 

ARRAS, a hamlet, in the parish of MARKET- WEIGH- 
TON, union of POCKLINGTON, Holme-Beacon division of 
the wapentake of HARTHILL, E. riding of YORK, 3 miles 
(E.) from Market- Weighton. It is situated on the 
wolds, and on the road from Market- Weighton to Be- 
verley : it is supposed there was a village here during 
the conflicts of the Saxons and Danes, if not at the time 
of the Romans, as, in a field, the foundations of build- 
ings have been discovered, as have also fragments of 
chariot wheels, and the heads of arrows. 

ARRETON (Sr. GEORGE), a parish, in the liberty of 
EAST MEDINA, Isle of Wight and S. divisions of the 
county of SOUTHAMPTON, 3 miles (S. E.) from Newport ; 
comprising by computation 9000 acres, and containing 
1964 inhabitants. It abounds with limestone, which is 
extensively quarried for building purposes, and for 
burning into lime. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 21 ; net income, 220 ; 
patron and impropriator, J. Fleming, Esq. : the small 
tithes have been commuted for 245 per annum, and 
there are 20 acres of glebe. The church, an ancient 
building, with a heavy embattled tower, contains a brass 
effigy of a Knight Templar. Two schools, one for boys 
and the other for girls, are endowed by a bequest of 
Mr. Mann in 1688, and are also supported by subscrip- 
tion. 

ARRINGTON (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the union 
of CAXTON and ARRINGTON, hundred of WETHERLEY, 
county of CAMBRIDGE, 5|: miles (S. S. E.) from Caxton ; 
containing 317 inhabitants, and comprising about 1300 
acres. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 7. 6. 3. ; net income, 69 ; patrons and im- 
propriators, Master and Fellows of Trinity College, 
Cambridge, who have commuted the tithes for a rent- 
charge of 390. There are 22 acres of glebe. 

ARROW, a township, in the parish of WOODCHURCH, 
union and Lower division of the hundred of WIRRALL, 
S. division of the county of CHESTER, gf miles (N. by W.) 
from Great Neston ; containing 122 inhabitants. About 
one-half of the land belongs to the grammar school at 
Warrington. 

ARROW (HOLY TRINITY], a parish, in the union of 
ALCESTER, partly in the Alcester, and partly in the 
Stratford, division of the hundred of BARLICHWAY, S. 
division of the county of WARWICK, 1 mile (S. W.) from 
Alcester ; containing, with Ragley and the hamlet of 
Oversley, 543 inhabitants. The parish is situated in 
the western part of the county, on the border of Wor- 
cestershire, which bounds it on the west; and con- 
sists of 39S3 acres, a considerable portion of which is 
attached to the beautiful demesne and interesting grounds 
of Ragley Park. Its surface is agreeable, diversified 
with hill and dale, the river Arrow flowing through it 
from north to south, with other streams in different 
directions, and the whole is thickly covered with timber, 
the rateable annual value of which is returned at 600. 
The roads from Alcester to Stratford and Evesham in- 
74 



tersect the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 10. 10. 7^. ; net income, 248 ; pa- 
tron, the Marquess of Hertford. The church is an an- 
cient structure, the tower of which was rebuilt in 1760. 

ARROWTHORNE, a township, partly in the parish 
of HORNBY, but chiefly in that of BROMPTON-PATRICK, 
union of LEYBURN, wapentake of HANG-EAST, N. riding 
of YORK, 5 miles (S. W. by S.) from Catterick ; con- 
taining 81 inhabitants. It is situated to the west of the 
river Swale, and comprises about 850 acres of land. 

ARTHINGTON, a township, in the parish of ADDLE, 
Upper division of the wapentake of SKYRACK, W. riding 
of YORK, 4^ miles (E.) from Otley ; containing 336 in- 
habitants. This place is situated in the beautiful valley 
of Wharfdale, and abounds with interesting scenery ; 
and Arthington Hall, the seat of T. W. Carruthers, Esq., 
of Dormont, N. B., is in the township. A school is 
supported by subscription. A convent of Cluniac nuns 
was founded here, in the twelfth century, by Piers de 
Ardington, which was valued at the dissolution at 19 : 
the site is occupied by a farm-house now called the 
" Nunnery." 

ARTHINGWORTH (Sr. ANDREW), a parish, in the 
union of MARKET-HARBOROUGH, hundred of ROTH- 
WELL, N. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 4^ 
miles (S. by E.) from Harborough ; containing 242 inha- 
bitants. It comprises 1593 acres, of which 1293 are 
pasture, 245 arable, and 55 woodland ; the soil is of 
various qualities, a great part being a strong clay ; the 
grazing grounds are very fine. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 12. 2. 85. ; net income, 
323 ; patron, L. Rokeby, Esq. The tithes were com- 
muted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1767 ; the 
glebe consists of 215 acres. The church is an ancient 
structure, with a handsome well-proportioned tower of 
later date. A school is endowed with a house and 
about 24 acres of land, the latter let for 36 per annum. 

ARTHURET (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of LONGTOWN, ESKDALE ward, E. division of CUMBER- 
LAND, f of a mile (S.) from Longtown ; comprising the 
townships of Breconhill, Lyneside, Longtown, and Ne- 
therby, and containing 2859 inhabitants. This parish 
is situated on the border of Scotland, where, in 1337, a 
Scottish army crossed, and, marching eastward, de- 
stroyed about twenty villages ; and at the chapel of 
Solom, a small oratory, which anciently stood near the 
spot called the Chapel Flosh, commissioners from Eng- 
land and Scotland met, in 1343, to settle the boundaries 
of the respective countries. On Solom Moss, in 1 542, 
the Scots, 10,000 in number, but discontented with their 
commander, Oliver Sinclair, a favourite of the Scottish 
monarch, allowed themselves to be defeated by a small 
body of about 500 English troops, under the command 
of Dacres and Musgrave, and it is said that 1000 of 
them were made prisoners, amongst whom were 200 
noblemen, esquires, and gentlemen. The parish com- 
prises about 11,000 acres, and there are quarries of 
white and red freestone within its limits. The living is 
a rectory, valued in the king's books at 3. 2. 1. ; net 
income, 687 ; patron, Sir J. R. G. Graham, Bart. 
The church was rebuilt in 1609, with the exception of 
the tower, which was not erected till 1690: in the 
churchyard is a rude cross, with a. pierced capital, near 
which were interred the remains of Archibald Armstrong, 
court jester to James I. and Charles I., and a native of 



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Arms. 



the parish. An artificial tumulus, in the form of a pros- 
trate human figure, near the church, is said to have been 
raised over the body of a chieftain slain in the above- 
mentioned battle. 

ARTILLERY-GROUND, OLD, a liberty, in the 
union of WHITECHAPEL, locally in the Finsbury division 
of the hundred of OSSULSTONE, county of MIDDLESEX ; 
containing 1558 inhabitants. It forms one of five divi- 
sions of the liberty of the Tower which has a peculiar 
jurisdiction, and is detached. 

ARTINGTON, a tything, in the parish of ST. NI- 
CHOLAS, GUJLDFORD, union of GUILDFORD, First divi- 
sion of the hundred of GODALMING, W. division of 
SURREY, 1 mile (S. by W.) from Guildford ; containing 
687 inhabitants, 

ARUNDEL (HOLY TRI- 
NITY), a borough, market- 
town, and parish, having ex- 
clusive jurisdiction, locally 
in the hundred and rape of 
ARUNDEL, W. division of 
SUSSEX, 10 miles (E. by N.) 
from Chichester, and 55 (S. 
by W.) from London ; con- 
taining 2624 inhabitants. 
This place, which derives its 
name from its situation in a 
dale watered by the river 
Arun, is first noticed in the will of Alfred, who be- 
queathed the castle and a few adjacent residences to his 
nephew Athelm. The castle, rebuilt by Roger de Mont- 
gomery, at the time of the Conquest, was, in the reign 
of Henry I., besieged and taken from his son, Robert de 
Belesme, who had rebelled against his sovereign, and 
settled by that monarch on his second wife Adeliza, 
who by a subsequent marriage conveyed it to William 
D'Albini, Lord of Buckenham, in the county of Norfolk. 
Matilda, daughter of Henry I., asserting her claim to 
the throne in opposition to Stephen, landed at Little- 
hampton in 1139, and was received and protected for 
several days in this castle against the forces of her 
opponent, in recompense for which service, her son, 
Henry II. on his accession, granted the castle and 
honour of Arundel to William D'Albini and his heirs 
for ever. W 7 illiam, the fourth earl, dying without heirs 
male, the property was divided among his four sisters, 
and the castle and manor of Arundel descended to John 
Fitzalan, son of the second sister, in whose family they 
continued till 1580, when they passed to Philip Howard, 
Earl of Surrey, descendant of another of the sisters, who 
had married Thomas, Duke of Norfolk 5 but on his 
attainder in 1589, the castle and manor of Arundel 
reverted to the crown, and continued to form part of 
the royal possessions till the death of Queen Elizabeth. 
The property was restored by James I. to Thomas, son 
of Philip, from whom, in uninterrupted succession, it 
has descended to its present proprietor, Henry Charles, 
Earl of Aruudel and Duke of Norfolk. During the civil 
wars the castle was garrisoned for the parliament, but 
in l43 was taken by the royalists under the command 
of Lord Hopton, who placed in it a garrison of 200 men, 
and appointed Col. Ford, high sheriff of the county, 
governor : being, however, afterwards besieged by Sir 
William Waller, it finally surrendered after a defence of 
seventeen days, and was dismantled as a place of de- 
75 



fence, and so far destroyed as to unfit it for a baronial 
residence. 

The CASTLE is situated on the summit of a high hill, 
and defended on two sides by the precipitous ac- 
clivity of the ground, and on the other by deep fosses : 
the walls inclosed an area of 950 feet in length, and 
250 feet in width, in the centre of which was the keep, 
a circular tower of great strength, and 100 feet in height, 
built on an artificial mound, and evidently of Norman 
origin. After remaining in a ruinous state till 1720, 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, restored part of the buildings, 
and erected others of modern style, which he made his 
occasional residence. Charles, the llth duke, in 1791, 
made considerable additions : the north-west, front was 
built in 1795, and the wing which contains the library 
and other apartments was completed in 1801. The 
entrance, which is by a deeply recessed Norman arched 
doorway, leads to the grand staircase and gallery, the 
latter of which, 195 feet in length, opens into the Barons' 
hall, erected in commemoration of the triumph of the 
barons in obtaining Magna Charta. The library is a 
strikingly magnificent apartment, 1 17 feet in length and 
35 feet wide, panelled throughout with mahogany and 
cedar exquisitely carved, with a richly ornamented roof. 
The ehapel is an elegant structure in the decorated 
English style, the walls of which are strengthened with 
slender enriched buttresses, terminating in crocketed 
pinnacles ; and the interior is lighted by windows of 
excellent design. The banquetting-room, formerly the 
ancient chapel, the saloon, and all the state apartments 
of this magnificent structure, are of corresponding splen- 
dour : the entire range of building occupies three sides 
of a quadrangle, and the expense of restoration and the 
erection of new portions has already amounted to 
400,000. The pleasure-grounds and gardens are taste- 
fully laid out, and the park, which abounds with stately 
timber, comprises 1200 acres ^ the surrounding country 
abounds with richly varied and picturesque scenery, and 
from the higher grounds within the park, and especially 
from the towers of the castle, are obtained extensive and 
beautiful prospects. The castle is the head of the honour 
of Arundel, and confers on its possessor the title of Earl 
without creation, a feudal right, which was adjudged by 
parliament, in the 1 1th of Henry VI., to an ancestor of 
the present Duke of Norfolk. 

The TOWN is pleasantly situated on rising ground 
within four miles of the sea, and chiefly on the north 
bank of the river Arun, over which is a neat stone bridge 
of three arches : the houses are in general well built, 
and many of them are modern and of handsome ap- 
pearance ; the streets, which are lighted with gas, are 
paved under an act of the 25th of George III., and the 
inhabitants plentifully supplied with excellent water. A 
considerable coasting trade is carried on : the imports 
are chiefly butter, bacon, pork, lard, grain, and starch 
from Ireland ; grain and cheese from Holland ; grain, 
oilcake, wine, fruit, and eggs from France ; timber, 
chiefly from the Baltic ; and coal from Newcastle and 
Scotland. The exports are principally oak-timber, corn, 
flour, and bark to the west of England and Liverpool, 
and to Ireland. The port, which has a custom-house 
with the usual officers, also affords a facility of inter- 
course between London and the Mediterranean, enabling 
the fruit ships from the latter to perform two voyages 
in the season : ships drawing sixteen feet of water can 

L 2 



ARU N 



A SB Y 



enter the port. A canal, connecting the Arun with the 
Thames and with Portsmouth, affords a medium of con- 
veyance to various parts of the kingdom. There are 
two breweries on a large scale for the supply of the 
neighbourhood. The market is on Tuesday, chiefly for 
corn, the sale of which is considerable, and on every 
alternate Tuesday there is a large cattle market : a few 
years since, a building was erected by subscription on 
the quay, for the purpose of a corn-market. The fairs 
are held on May 14th, Sept. 25th, and Dec. 17th, chiefly 
for cattle and pedlery ; but, since the cattle markets 
were established, they have been but little attended. 
Arundel is a BOROUGH by prescription, and has had a 
corporation from the time of the Conquest : the govern- 
ment is vested in a mayor, three aldermen, and twelve 
councillors, and the mayor and late mayor are justices of 
the peace : the municipal and parliamentary boundaries 
of the borough are the same, and are co-extensive with 
those of the parish. Petty-sessions are held by the 
county magistrates every alternate Tuesday, and an 
elegant town-hall was lately erected by his Grace the 
late Duke of Norfolk, at an expense of 4000. The 
borough returned two members to parliament from the 
time of Edward I. to the 2nd of William IV., when it 
was destined thenceforward to send only one : the right 
of election is vested in the inhabitants paying scot and 
lot ; the mayor is the returning officer. 

The parish comprises by computation about 1800 
acres. The LIVING is a discharged vicarage, valued in 
the king's books at 5. 0. 10.; net income, 199; 
patron and impropriator, -Duke of Norfolk. The church, 
situated at the upper end of the town, was greatly 
damaged by the forces of Sir William Waller, who oc- 
cupied it during the siege of the castle ; but it was 
restored by the late Duke. It is a large and ancient 
cruciform structure, with a. low but well-built central 
tower, surmounted by an obtuse leaden spire painted 
white ; it is chiefly in the later English style, and the 
interior is very neatly fitted up. At the east end is the 
Norfolk chapel, consisting of a nave and north aisle, 
divided by three fine arches, and lighted by windows of 
elegant design : this is the burial-place of the noble 
family of Howard, and it contains some grand and in- 
teresting monuments. There is a place of worship for 
Independents ; and a parochial school, in which are 
300 children, is conducted in an appropriate building 
erected in 1818 by the llth Duke. Robert de Montgo- 
mery founded the Benedictine monastery of St. Nicholas, 
to which William D'Albini, the second earl, annexed 
the then vacant rectory of Arundel ; the establishment 
flourished for two centuries, but was so greatly im- 
poverished by Edward III., that it was neglected till 
the reign of Richard II., when the Earl of Arundel 
dissolved it, and founded in its place the College of the 
Holy Trinity, for a master, twelve chaplains, two dea- 
cons, two sub-deacons, and four choristers. This col- 
lege continued to flourish till the dissolution, when its 
revenues were estimated at 168. 0. 7. ; part of the 
original building was converted by Charles, Duke of 
Norfolk, into a Roman Catholic chapel and a residence 
for his chaplain, the Rev. M. A. Tierney, author of the 
"History and Antiquities of the Castle and Town of 
Arundel." The same earl founded also the hospital of 
the Holy Trinity for a master and poor brethren, the 
revenue of which at the dissolution was valued at 
76 



93. 18. 6f. : on the rebuilding of the bridge over the 
Arun, in 1724, a considerable portion of the edifice was 
removed to furnish materials for that structure. The 
learned Chillingworth, who had joined the royal army, 
was taken prisoner during the siege of the castle by the 
parliamentarians, and confined in the episcopal palace of 
Chichester, where he died. 

ARYANS, (ST.) a parish, in the union and division 
of CHEPSTOW, partly in the hundred of RAGLAN, but 
chiefly in the Upper division of the hundred of CALDI- 
COT, county of MONMOUTH, 2 miles (N. W. by N.) from 
Chepstow ; containing, with the hamlet of Portcasseg, 
354 inhabitants. The parish, which is bounded on the 
north-east by the river Wye, and situated on the road 
from Monmouth to Chepstow, comprises by computation 
2840 acres, and abounds in richly picturesque and 
romantic scenery, which, in many situations, is of great 
beauty and diversity. From Piercefield Park, the splen- 
did seat of Nathaniel Wells, Esq., the views are re- 
markably magnificent, and embrace many reaches of the 
Wye, the Severn, and a great range of the surrounding 
country. The mansion, situated on an eminence, in 
the midst of fine plantations, is a superb elevation of 
freestone, consisting of a centre and two wings, and 
much admired for its elegance, and tasteful architecture : 
on the spacious staircase are four beautiful pieces of 
Gobelin tapestry, which belonged to Louis XVI., repre- 
senting many subjects in the natural history of Africa. 
The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 53 ; 
patron and impropriator, Duke of Beaufort : about 50 
acres of land of indifferent quality, contained in two 
small farms in other parishes, belong to the curacy. 
The church is in the early English style, with a square 
tower, erected in 1821. Here are a parochial school and 
two others, all supported by subscription. Remains 
exist of two ancient chapels, dedicated respectively to 
St. Kiugsmark and St. Lawrence : in the park, where is 
a chalybeate spring, are the remains of an encampment ; 
and there is a small intrenchment in the hamlet of 
Portcasseg. 

ARYHOLME, with HOWTHORPE, a township, in the 
parish of HOVINGHAM, union of MALTON, wapentake of 
RYEDALE, N. riding of YORK, 7i miles (W.) from New 
Malton ; containing 36 inhabitants. 

ASBY, GREAT (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union 
and division of EAST ward, county of WESTMORLAND, 
4| miles (S. by W.) from Appleby ; containing, with the 
townships of Asby-Windewath, Asby-Coatsforth, and 
Little Asby, 407 inhabitants, of whom 222 are in the 
first, with the hamlet of Garthern ; 129 in the second ; 
and 56 in the third, with the hamlet of Asby-Over- 
grange. It comprises by computation 6500 acres, and 
is bounded on the south by the parish of Crosby Garret 
and by Orton Fells ; the surface is diversified with hills 
and valleys, and is intersected by numerous rivulets, near 
the margin of one of which, in the hollow called Asby 
Gill, is Plate hole, a remarkable cavern, intersected by 
a small stream, and which has been explored to an 
extent of more than 500 yards. The substratum is 
principally limestone, and on the common belonging to 
the manor has been lately discovered a very valuable 
fossil marble. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 23. 13. 4. ; patron, John Hill, Esq. ; 
net income, 205. The church is a very ancient struc- 
ture with lofty gables, and strengthened by massive 



A SG A 



ASH 



buttresses : the parsonage-house occupies the site of a 
nunnery, of which the chapel and prison are still partly 
remaining, the latter being used as a cellar. There was 
formerly a chapel at Little Asby, dedicated to St. Leo- 
nard. A school-house was built in 1688, by George 
Smith, citizen and merchant-tailor of London, to which 
Dr. Thomas Smith, Bishop of Carlisle (who was born at 
Whitewall, near the village), gave 100 ; and an alms- 
house was founded in 1812 for four poor widows. Near 
the church is St. Helen's well, supposed to have been a 
bath belonging to the nunnery. 

ASCOTE, CHAPEL, an extra-parochial liberty, in 
the S. division of the hundred of KNIGHTLOW, S. divi- 
sion of the county of WARWICK, 2 miles (N. W. by N.) 
from Southam ; containing 1 inhabitants, and com- 
prising 600 acres. 

ASCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of WING, union of 
LEIGHTON-BUZZARD, hundred of COTTESLOE, county of 
BUCKINGHAM ; containing 98 inhabitants. 

ASCOTT UNDER WYCHWOOD (HOLY TRINITY), 
a parish, in the union of CHIPPING-NORTON, hundred 
of CHADLINGTON, county of OXFORD, 5f miles (N. E. 
by N.) from Burford ; containing 463 inhabitants. The 
parish is divided into two portions, Earl's Ascott and 
Ascott-Regis ; and the village is pleasantly situated in a 
valley on the bank of the river Evenlode, near the 
border of Wychwood Forest. The living is a perpetual 
curacy ; net income, 55 ; patron, Vicar of Shipton ; 
appropriator, Prebendary of Ascott in the Cathedral of 
Salisbury. The church is a neat ancient building. There 
is a place of worship for Particular Baptists ; also a 
school, established by Lady Churchill. 

ASCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of GREAT MILTON, 
union and hundred of THAME, county of OXFORD, 4\ 
miles (N.) from Bensington ; containing 29 inhabitants. 

ASCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of WHICHFORD, 
union of SHIPSTON-ON-STOUR, Brails division of the 
hundred of KINGTON, S. division of the county of 
WARWICK, 6 miles (S. E.) from Shipston. 

ASENBY, a township, in the parish of TOPCLIFFE, 
wapentake of HALLIKELD, N. riding of YORK, 5f miles 
(N.) from Boroughbridge ; containing 26 1 inhabitants. 
It is situated on the south-western acclivities of Swale- 
dale, and comprises by computation 1131 acres, mostly 
occupied in farms. A bed of gravel affords excellent 
material for repairing the roads ; and a bed of coal- 
shale shows itself on the eminences of the dale. The 
tithes have been commuted for rent-charges amounting 
to 334. 10., of which 250 are payable to the impro- 
priator, 64. 10. to the vicar of Topcliffe, and 20 to 
the Dean and Chapter of York. 

ASGARBY (Sx. ANDREW), a parish, in the union of 
SLEAFORD, wapentake of ASWARDHURN, parts of KES- 
TEVEN, county of LINCOLN, 2f miles (E.) from Sleaford ; 
containing, with the hamlet of Boughton, 77 inhabitants. 
The living is a vicarage, united in 1737 to the rectory 
of Kirby-le-Thorpe, and valued in the king's books at 
10. 14. 4|. The church is in the later English style, 
with a lofty tower surmounted by a fine crocketed 
spire. 

ASGARBY (ST. SWITHIN), a parish, in the union of 
HORNCASTLE, W. division of the soke of BOLINGBROKE, 
parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 2 miles (N. by 
W.) from Bolingbroke ; containing 131 inhabitants. It 
comprises by computation 1950 acres, two-thirds of 
77 



which are pasture, and one-third arable ; the soil is a 
sandy loam. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the 
patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln ; but in 
consequence of the suppression of the prebend of 
Asgarby, the bishop presents pro hue vice under the act 
of parliament ; net income, 34, with three acres of 
glebe. The church is a small plain edifice, rebuilt about 
forty years ago. In 1667, Henry Pell bequeathed a 
rent-charge of 10 for the instruction of poor children 
of Asgarby, Howell, and Eveden, in the charity school 
at Ewerby. There are some vestiges of an encamp- 
ment, probably formed during the civil wars, and near 
which human skeletons are frequently dug up. 

ASH, a hamlet, in the parish of SUTTON-ON-THE- 
HILL, union of BURTON-UPON-TRENT, hundred of 
APPLETREE, S. division of the county of DERBY, 8 
miles (W. S. W.) from Derby. The vicarial tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 83. 3. 

ASH, a hamlet, in the parish of TH ROWLEY, union 
of OAKHAMPTON, hundred of WONFORD, Crockernwell 
and S. divisions of DEVON, 7? miles (E. S. E.) from 
Oakharnpton. John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough, 
the celebrated statesman and general, was born here, in 
1650. 

ASH, county of DURHAM. See ESH. 

ASH, (ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a parish, in the 
union of DARTFORD, hundred of AXTON, DARTFORD, 
and WILMINGTON, lathe of SUTTON-AT-HONE, W. divi- 
sion of KENT, 9 miles (N. E.) from Seven Oaks : con- 
taining 663 inhabitants. It comprises 3022 acres, of 
which 1780 are arable, 180 meadow, 624 woodland, 244 
cinque-foil, 169 hop-grounds, and 21 furze and wa te ; 
the surface is hilly and well wooded, and the soil is in 
some parts chalky, but chiefly a stiff" loam. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 9. 18. 4., 
and in the gift of the family of Lambard : the tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 675, and 
there are 20 acres of glebe. A school containing 30 
boys is endowed with 20 per annum, and a girls' 
national school was erected in 1814. 

ASH, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of MAR- 
TOCK, union of YEOVIL, W. division of SOMERSET ; 
containing 322 inhabitants. 

ASH (ST. PETER), a parish, under Gilbert's act, 
partly in the First division of the hundred of GODLEY, and 
partly in the First division of the hundred of WOKEING, 
W. division of SURREY, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from 
Farnham ; containing, with Frimley chapelry and Nor- 
mandy tything, 2236 inhabitants. The parish is inter- 
sected by the Basingstoke canal and the South-Western 
railway, and comprises by computation 4000 acres, of 
which one-half'is under cultivation : a species of sand- 
stone, dug out of the common, is used for building ; 
and pebbles are found, susceptible of a bright polish, 
which are commonly called Bagshot diamonds. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
15. 18. 11^.; net income, 473 ; patrons, Warden 
and Fellows of Winchester College. The church is a 
plain structure, and previously to the dissolution of 
monasteries was attached to the abbey of Chertsey. 
There is also a church at Frimley, of which the living 
is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector ; 
and a national school is supported by subscription. Dr. 
Young is said to have written a portion of the " Night 
Thoughts" at the rectory-house, then the residence of 



ASH 



Dr. Harris, who married a sister of the poet, and was 
incumbent from 1718 to 1759. 

ASH-BOCKING (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of BOSMERE and CLAYDON, E. divi- 
sion of SUFFOLK, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Needham- 
Market ; comprising by measurement 1398 acres, and 
containing 321 inhabitants. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued 
in the king's books at 9. 18. 65. ; it is in the patronage 
of the Crown. The tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 375, and 3 per annum are paid to 
the rector of Hemingstone ; the glebe consists of about 
1 1 acres. 

ASH, CAMPSEY (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST) , a parish, 
in the union of PLOMESGATE, hundred of LOES, E. divi- 
sion of SUFFOLK, 2 miles (E.) from Wickham-Market ; 
containing 374 inhabitants. In the reign of Richard I., 
Theobald de Valoins gave his estate here to his two 
sisters, that they might build a nunnery in honour of 
the Virgin Mary: it was of the order of St. Clare, or 
the Minoresses, and at the dissolution had a revenue of 
182. 9. 5. : a portion of the buildings still remains. 
A collegiate chapel, in honour of the Annunciation, was 
also founded here, by Maud, Countess of Ulster, for a 
warden and four secular priests, in 1347, seven years 
after which the establishment was removed to Bruis- 
yard. The parish comprises by measurement 1813 
acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 14. 5., and in the gift of Thellusson's Trus- 
tees : the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 430, and there are 9^ acres of glebe. A school is 
conducted on the national plan. 

ASH-GILL, a hamlet, in the township and parish 
of COVERHAM, union of LEYBURN, wapentake of HANG- 
WEST, N. riding of YORK, If mile {W.) from Middle- 
ham. Here is a noted training-ground for horses, the 
property of the Lister family. 

ASH, GREAT, a township, in the parish of WHIT- 
CHURCH, Whitchurch division of the hundred of NORTH 
BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP, 2| miles {S. E. by E.) 
from Whitchurch ; containing 204 inhabitants. 

ASH, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of WHIT- 
CHURCH, Whitchurch division of the hundred of NORTH 
BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP, 2|- miles (S. E. by E.) 
from Whitchurch ; containing 208 inhabitants. A 
church, erected by subscription, was consecrated Aug. 
31st, 1837. 

ASH NEAR SANDWICH (S T . NICHOLAS), a parish, 
in the union of EASTRY, hundred of WINGHAM, lathe of 
ST. AUGUSTINE, E. division of KENT, 3 miles (E.) from 
Wingham ; containing 2077 inhabitants. This place is 
by most antiquaries identified with the Rutupium, or 
Urbs Rutupia, of the Romans, one of the earliest sta- 
tions, if not the first, in the island, and supposed by 
Camden to have been established by that people for the 
protection of their haven called Portus Rutupensis, the 
landing-place of their fleets, and the most usual passage 
into Britain. According to Bede, the station was called 
by the Saxons Reptaceastre, and subsequently, by Alfred 
of Beverley, Richeberg, from which its present name 
Richborough is derived. Of the ancient city every 
vestige has disappeared, and the site is now covered 
with corn-fields : part of the citadel alone remains, 
consisting of portions of the walls, about 200 feet in 
length, varying from ten to thirty feet in height, and 
78 



about twelve feet thick, forming one of the most inter- 
esting relics of Roman antiquity in the kingdom. The 
parish, which is intersected by the road from London to 
Deal, and bounded on the north by the river Stour, 
over which are two ferries, comprises 6872a. Ir. 36p., of 
which 3128 acres are arable, 3258 meadow, 331 orchards 
and gardens, 100 hop grounds, 49 wood, and 6 recto- 
rial glebe ; the soil is rich and fertile. Pleasure fairs 
are held on April 5th, and Oct. llth. The living is a 
perpetual curacy; net income, 147; patron and ap- 
propriator, Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is a 
handsome building in the early and later English styles j 
and there is a chapel of ease, erected in 1841, in the early 
English style, partly by subscription and partly by aid of 
a grant from the Church Building Society. There are two 
small places of worship for Wesleyans ; and a free school, 
founded and endowed with 75 per annum, in 1714, by 
the Cartwright family, affords instruction to 100 children. 

ASH-PRIORS (HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in the 
union of TAUNTON, W. division of the hundred of 
KINGSBURY, and of the county of SOMERSET, 6 miles 
{N. W. by W.) from Taunton ; comprising by computa- 
tion 600 acres, and containing 226 inhabitants. The 
name of this place is a corruption of Esse Prioris, the 
property of the prior, which related to a house here, 
anciently used for a country residence by the prior of 
Taunton. The parish comprises by computation 500 
acres, and the church and principal parts of the village 
are beautifully situated on rising ground, commanding 
a fine view of Taunton Dean. There are some quarries 
of red sandstone, which is of good quality for building, 
and is also burnt for manure. The living is a perpetual 
curacy, in the gift of Sir Thomas Buckler Lethbridge, 
Bart., with a net income of 70 : the tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 110. The church, a 
neat structure in the later English style, has recently 
been enlarged by the addition of a new aisle, and beau- 
tified at the sole expense of Sir T. B. Lethbridge. A 
national school is supported by subscription. Priory 
House, of which a small portion yet remains, was once 
the residence of the celebrated Admiral Blake. 

ASHAMPSTEAD (ST. CLEMENT), a parish, in the 
union of BRADFIELD, hundred of MORETON, county of 
BERKS, 10 miles (N. W. by W.) from Reading ; containing 
404 inhabitants. It comprises I666a. Ir. 32p., of which 
1350 acres are in cultivation; there are 70 acres of 
beech wood, 250 of coppice, and 100 common. The 
living is annexed to the vicarage of Basildon ; impro- 
priator, R. Hopkins, Esq. A school is supported by 
subscription. 

ASHAMPSTEAD, a chapelry, in the parish and 
hundred of LEWKNOR, county of OXFORD, 3f miles (N. 
W.) from Great Marlow. The chapel is dedicated to St. 
Mary de More. 

ASHBOURN (Sr. OSWALD), a market-town and 
parish, comprising the townships of Hulland, Hulland- 
Ward, Hulland-Intacks, Sturston, and Yeldersley, in the 
hundred of APPLETREE ; the township of Clitton and 
Compton, in the hundred of MORLESTON and LIT- 
CHURCH ; and the chapelry of Alsop-le-dale and Eaton, 
the hamlet of Newton-Grange, and the liberty of Offcote- 
Underwood, in the hundred of WIRKSWORTH, S. division 
of the county of DERBY ; and containing 4884 inhabit- 
ants, of whom 2246 are in the town, 13| miles (N. W. 
by W.) from Derby, and 140 (N. W. byN.) from London. 



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This place, which at the time of the Conquest was held 
in royal demesne, is in Domesday-book called Esseburn. 
In 1644 a battle was fought here between the royalists 
and the parliamentarians, in which the former were 
defeated with considerable loss. Charles I. was at 
Ashbourn during the battle, and again, in 1645, on his 
march to Done-aster, at the head of 3000 horse, when a 
skirmish took place, in which the royalists defeated Sir 
John Cell, the leader of the parliamentarian forces in 
this part of the country : during his stay the king 
attended divine service at the church. Charles Edward 
Stuart, accompanied by the Dukes of Athol and Perth, 
on their return from Derby in 1745, remained for one 
night in the town, taking forcible possession of the 
manor-house, from which they expelled Sir Brooke 
Boothby and his family. On Sir Brooke's return, he 
found the names of the officers written in chalk upon 
the doors of the apartments which they had severally 
occupied : of these inscriptions, which were overlaid 
with white paint, some are preserved, and the bedroom 
in which the Pretender slept is still shown. 

The TOWN is beautifully situated in a deep vale, on 
the eastern bank of the river Dove, over which there is 
a bridge of stone : the houses are principally built of 
red brick, and roofed with slate ; the streets are partly 
paved, and the inhabitants are well supplied with water. 
The entrance from London is highly picturesque, com- 
manding a fine view of the beautiful vale on the left, 
and of Ashbourn Hall, the seat of Sir William Boothby, 
Bart., on the right : the vicinity abounds with pleasing 
and richly varied scenery. The reading and news-rooms, 
and the libraries, are respectably supported. The manu- 
facture of cotton and tambour lace is carried on to a 
considerable extent, and a great quantity of cheese and 
malt is sent to the metropolis and other towns ; but 
the principal support of the town is derived from its 
market and numerous fairs. The market is on Saturday ; 
and fairs are held on the first Tuesday in Jan. and 
Feb. 13th, for horses and cattle ; the second Monday 
in March, for horses, cattle, and cheese ; April 3rd, 
May 21st, and July 5th, for horses, cattle, and wool ; 
Aug. 16th, and Sept. 20th, for horses and cattle ; the 
third Monday in Sept. for horses, cattle, and cheese ; 
and Nov. 29th, for horses. Ashbourn is in the honour 
of Tutbury, duchy of Lancaster, and within the juris- 
diction of a court of pleas held at Tutbury every third 
Tuesday, for the recovery of debts under 40s. Courts 
leet and baron are held annually under the lord of the 
manor, at which constables and other officers for the 
town are appointed. 

The parish comprises 7043 acres. The LIVING is a 
discharged vicarage, with the rectory of Mappleton 
united, valued in the king's books at 5. 4. 7. ; net 
income, 134 ; patron and appropriator, Dean of Lin- 
coln. The church, erected in 1240 by Hugh de Patishull, 
Bishop of Coventry, is a spacious cruciform structure, 
in the early style of English architecture, with a central 
tower surmounted by a lofty and richly ornamented 
octagonal spire : the interior has lately undergone ex- 
tensive repairs and embellishments. The northern part 
of the chancel, appropriated as a sepulchral chapel to 
the Boothby family, contains, among others, an ex- 
quisitely sculptured monument by Banks, to the me- 
mory of Penelope, only child of Sir Brooke Boothby, 
who died at the age of five years, which is said to have 
79 



suggested to Chantrey the design of his celebrated monu- 
ment in Lichfield cathedral. There are places of worship 
for Baptists, Wesleyans, and the Countess of Hunting- 
don's Connexion. The free grammar school was founded 
in 1585, under a charter of Queen Elizabeth, and en- 
dowed with estates purchased by the inhabitants, from 
the proceeds of which 131. 10. per annum, with a 
house and garden, are given to the master, and 65. 15. 
with a house, to the usher. An English school was 
founded in 1710, and endowed with 10 per annum, by 
Mr. Spalden, for the instruction of thirty boys, till they 
should be fit to enter the grammar school : he also 
endowed a school for thirty girls under twelve years of 
age, the mistress of which has 10 per annum. In 
addition to these, a national school is carried on ; and 
there are several almshouses, founded at various periods, 
and some of them endowed with considerable funds. 
In the neighbourhood formerly stood a chapel, dedicated 
to St. Mary, which, previously to its being taken down 
some years ago, was used as a malt-house. 

ASHBRITTLE (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, 
in the union of WELLINGTON, hundred of MILVERTON, 
W. division of SOMERSET, 6f miles (W.) from Welling- 
ton j containing 540 inhabitants, and comprising 24S9a. 
2r. lOjo. The parish is situated on the borders of the 
county of Devon, and includes the tything of Greenham. 
Fairs are held in Feb. and Oct. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 19. 3. 11^., and in the 
gift of J. Quick, Esq. : the tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 400, and the glebe consists of 80 
acres. 

ASHBURNHAM (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the 
union of BATTLE, hundred of FOXEARLE, rape of HAST- 
INGS, E. division of SUSSEX, 4^ miles (W. by S.) from 
Battle 5 containg 790 inhabitants. The manor, with the 
exception only of a lew years, has been, from a time 
anterior to the Conquest, in the continued possession of 
the noble family of Ashburnham, whose mansion-house 
is beautifully situated, and surrounded by a fine park : 
the parish comprises about 3600 acres, and was once 
noted for the smelting of iron-ore. The living is a 
vicarage, with the rectory of Penhurst annexed, valued 
in the king's books at 8. 13. 4. ; patron and impro- 
priator, the Earl of Ashburnham. The great tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 260, and 
the vicarial for 239 ; the glebe consists of 6 acres. A 
lectureship was founded in 1631 by R. Bateman, Esq., 
and others, with an endowment of 40 per annum for 
two sermons every week ; it is in the gift of the co- 
heiresses of the late Sir Hugh Bateman, the last surviv- 
ing trustee. The church, situated behind Ashburnham 
House, is a neat cruciform edifice, in the decorated Eng- 
lish style, with a tower ; the south transept contains a 
gallery for the family, and in the north are handsome 
monuments to William and John Ashburnham and 
their wives ; and, in a glass case, lined with red velvet, 
are preserved the watch of Charles I., and portions of 
the dress which he wore when he was beheaded. The 
Earl of Ashburnham supports a school for thirty girls ; 
and an almshouse for six aged widows, supposed to 
have been originally erected by General William Ash- 
burnham, and which was rebuilt by the late earl in the 
year 1817, is supported by the present earl, who allows 
a certain sum to each of the inmates. There are several 
mineral springs in the parish. 



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Seal and Arms. 



ASHBURTON (ST. AN- 
DREW), a borough, market- 
town, and parish, in the 
union of NEWTON-ABBOT, 
hundred of TEIGNBRIDGE, 
Teignhridge and S. divisions 
of DEVON, 19 miles (S. W.) 
from Exeter, and 192 (W. by 
S.) from London, on the 
road to Plymouth ; contain- 
ing 3841 inhabitants. This 
town, anciently called Ais- 
bertone, in the lime of Ed- 
ward the Confessor belonged to Brietric, and at the 
Conquest to Judael de Totnais. It seems by Domesday 
book to have then been part of the demesne of the 
crown, being therein described as " Terra Regis." The 
place was subsequently annexed to the see of Exeter ; 
and, in 1310, Bishop Stapylton obtained for it a grant 
of a market, and four fairs ; and, in 1672, another 
market, chiefly for wool and yarn spun in Cornwall, 
was procured by Mr. John Ford, which has long been 
discontinued. It was made a stannary town by charter 
of Edward III., in 1328, being then noted for the mines 
of tin and copper which abounded in the neighbourhood. 
Henry IV., in the 3rd year of his reign, granted a charter, 
declaring that " the men of the manor of Aisbertone, 
which is ancient Demesne of our Crown," should be 
free from paying toll throughout the kingdom. It also 
appears that it belonged to the crown in the time of 
Charles I., as that king bestowed the manor upon his 
son Charles, when he created him Prince of Wales. 
How it was alienated by the crown is unknown ; but in 
the reign of Charles II. it was the property of Sir Robert 
Parkhurst and Lord Sondes, Earl of Feversham, the 
former of whom sold his moiety to Sir John Stawell, of 
Parke, in South Bovey, by whose executors it was sold 
to Roger Tuckfield, Esq., from whom Lord Clinton, 
the present proprietor of one moiety of the borough, 
claims. The other moiety was, about the same time, 
purchased by Richard Duke, Esq., and is now vested in 
Sir L. V. Palk, Bart. Ashburton, in the parliamentary 
war, having been previously occupied by the royal troops 
under Lord Wentworth, was taken by Sir Thomas Fair- 
fax, on his march westward, in Jan. 1646. 

The TOWN is situated about a mile and a half from the 
river Dart, and consists principally of one street of con- 
siderable length : the houses are built of stone and roofed 
with slate, the latter of which is obtained from quarries 
in the vicinity. The inhabitants are well supplied with 
water j the river Yeo, a rapid stream, runs through the 
town, and turns several mills. There is a book society ; 
and card and dancing assemblies, and music meetings, 
are frequently held in a handsome suite of rooms at 
the Golden Lion inn. The environs abound with objects 
of interest, and the scenery on the banks of the river 
is celebrated for its picturesque and romantic beauty. 
The manufacture of serge and other woollen goods for 
the East India Company is carried on to a very great 
extent in the town and neighbourhood ; there are some 
mills for fulling cloth and for the spinning of yarn, and, 
in addition to the slate -quarries, mines of tin and copper 
are still worked in the neighbourhood. The market is 
on Saturday ; and fairs are held on the first Thursdays 
in March and June, the first Thursday after the 10th of 
80 



Aug. and the 1 1th of Nov., which last is a great sheep 
fair. Afhburton is a borough by prescription : a port- 
reeve, bailiff, constables, and subordinate officers are 
appointed annually at a court leet held by the steward 
of the borough, but they have no magisterial authority : 
a stannary court is held occasionally. The borough made 
two returns to parliament, in the C 26th of Edward I. and 
the 8th of Henry IV., but none subsequently until 1 640, 
when the franchise was restored by the last parliament 
of Charles I., and until the passing of the Reform Act it 
continued to return two members ; it now returns only 
one, the elective franchise being in the resident free- 
holders and the 10 householders of the entire parish : 
the portreeve is the' returning officer. 

The LIVING is a vicarage, with Bickington and Buck- 
land-in-the-Moor annexed, valued in the king's books 
at 38. 8. 11^. ; patrons and appropriators, Dean and 
Chapter of Exeter. The great tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 390, and the vicarial for 
528 ; the glebe consists of 60 acres. The church, 
which was formerly collegiate, is a venerable and spa- 
cious cruciform structure, in the later English style, 
with a square embattled tower. There are places of 
worship for Particular Baptists, Independents, and Wes- 
leyans. The free grammar school was founded in the 
3rd of James I. by William Werring, Esq., and endowed 
with lands, a portion of which belonged to the dissolved 
chantry of St. Lawrence, a fine ancient building with a 
tower and a small spire, now appropriated to the use of 
the school, and for public meetings : the original endow- 
ment has been augmented by subsequent benefactions, 
and two scholarships, each of 30 per annum, in Exeter 
College, Oxford, were recently founded in favour of boys 
educated at the school, by the late Mr. Gifford. The 
free school, in which 180 children are educated, was 
endowed in 1754, by Lord Middleton and John Harris, 
Esq., then representatives of the borough, in gratitude 
for the liberality of their constituents ; and in 1831 an 
excellent school-house was built at the expense of 500. 
Inconsiderable vestiges of a chapel, which belonged to 
the abbot of Buckfastleigh, are still discernible in the 
walls of a house occupied by Mr. Parham. John Dun- 
ning, Baron Ashburton, the eminent lawyer, was born 
here, Oct. 18th, 1731; he died Aug. 18th, 1783, and 
was interred in the church. Dr. Ireland, Dean of 
Westminster, and the late Mr. Gifford, editor of the 
Quarterly Review, were also natives of the place. The 
title of Baron Ashburton was revived, in 1835, in the 
person of Alexander Baring, Esq., nephew, by marriage 
of his father's sister, of the celebrated lawyer above 
noticed. 

ASHBURY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
FARRINGDON, hundred of SHRIVENHAM, county of 
BERKS, 6$ miles (N. W. by W.) from Lambourn; con- 
taining, with the tythings of Idstone and Odstone, and 
the hamlet of Kingstone-Winslow, 819 inhabitants. It 
comprises 5600 acres, a large portion of which is appro- 
priated to dairy farms. The living is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 11. 8. l. ; net income, 375 ; 
patron, the Rector, who presents one of three candidates 
nominated by Magdalene College, Oxford ; impropriator, 
Rev. Dr. Sandyford. The rectory is a sinecure, valued 
at 30. 12. 6. ; net income, 567 ; patron, the Bishop of 
Bath and Wells. The tithes were commuted for land, 
valued at about 500 per annum, and a money payment, 



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by an inclosure act, in 1770 ; the glebe consists of 25 
acres. A school is supported by subscription. The 
Roman road called the Ikeneld way passes near the 
village 5 and in the parish is an intrenchment, named 
Alfred's camp, near which are two barrows. Here 
are also a tumulus and cromlech, popularly designated 
" Wayland Smith," with which is connected a tradition, 
introduced by Sir Walter Scott, in his romance of " Ke- 
nilworth." 

ASHBURY (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
OAKHAMPTON, hundred of v BLACK TORRTNGTON, Black 
Torrington and Shebbear, and N. divisions of DEVON, 
5^ miles (S. W. by W.) from Hatherleigh ; containing 
65 inhabitants. It contains about 1450 acres, in general 
of a clayey soil. The living is a discharged rectory, va- 
lued in the king's books at 5. 13. 4., and in the patron- 
age of the Crown ; net income, 96. There are about 
120 acres of glebe. A school is conducted on the 
national plan. 

ASHBY (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
CAISTOR, wapentake of BRADLEY-HAVERSTOE, parts of 
LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 6 -miles (S. by W.) from 
Great Grimsby ; containing, with Fenby, 211 inhabit- 
ants. This parish, which is situated on the old road 
from Great Grimsby to Louth, and on the borders of 
the wolds, comprises, together with the hamlet of Fenby, 
1637 acres by admeasurement ; the soil is fertile, and 
the sub-soil is generally chalk ; the surface undulated, 
and the scenery picturesque. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 14. 10. 10., and in the 
gift of the Crown : the tithes have been commuted for 
a rent-charge of 252, and the glebe comprises 45 acres. 
The church, a very ancient structure, in the early Eng- 
lish style, with a square tower, contains an oak pulpit 
richly carved, and an elegant octagonal font, supported 
on a clustered pedestal, and panelled in quatrefoil : 
there are also two handsome monuments, of which one 
is to the memory of Sir William and Lady Frances 
Wray. There is a chapel of ease at Fenby; and a place 
of worship in the parish for Wesleyans. In 1641 six 
almshouses were built by Dame Wray, and endowed by 
her son Sir Christopher Wray, with a rent- charge of 
30, to which the present incumbent has added the in- 
terest of 100 ; there is also a rent of 4 distributed 
among the poor. 

ASHBY (ST. HELEN), a parish, in the union of 
SPILSBY, Wold division of the wapentake of CANDLE- 
SHOE, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 2^ miles 
(E. by N.) from Spilsby; containing 160 inhabitants. 
It comprises 906 acres by measurement, exclusively of 
roads. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 7. 10. 2^. ; net income, 157, arising 
from 185 acres of land allotted in 1811 in lieu of tithes 
by an inclosure act ; patrons, the Representatives of 
the late Dr. Fowler, Bishop of Ossory. The church was 
rebuilt in 1841. 

ASHBY, a township, in the parish of BOTTESFORD, 
union of GLANDFORD-BRIGG, E. division of the wapen- 
take of MANLEY, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 
6^ miles (W. by S.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing 
429 inhabitants. The village is large and pleasant, and 
the township comprises about 2100 acres, extending 
over the western ridge of the wolds to the river Trent, 
near which is a tract of moory land that has just under- 
gone the process of warping. There is a decoy, abound- 
VOL. I. 81 



ing in wild duck and other aquatic birds ; in the imme- 
diate vicinity of which a handsome mansion was built in 
1841, by H. Healey, Esq. Forty acres of land were 
awarded to the vicar of the parish at the inclosure. 
There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive 
Methodists. 

ASHBY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the EAST and 
WEST FLEGG incorporation, hundred of WEST FLEGG, 
E. division of NORFOLK, 4 miles (N.) from Acle ; con- 
taining, with the parish of Oby, 85 inhabitants, of whom 
16 are in Ashby. This parish, which was consolidated 
with those of Thirne and Oby in 1604, comprises about 
1000 acres, of which 800 are marsh and meadow land. 
The three places form one rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 10, and in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich : 
the tithes have been commuted for 690. Ashby con- 
sists of only one farm; and had formerly a church, of 
which there are very slight remains : the parsonage- 
house, a respectable residence, is in that part called Oby, 
and has a glebe of about 23 acres. 

ASHBY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of LOD- 
DON and CLAVERING, hundred of LODDON, E. division of 
NORFOLK, 7^ miles (S. E.) from Norwich ; containing 
263 inhabitants. The waste lands were inclosed under 
an act passed in 1837- The living is a rectory, united 
to that of Carleton, valued in the king's books at 6 ; 
patrons, alternately, Sir W. B. Proctor and Sir Charles 
Rich, Barts. The church consists of a nave and chancel, 
with a square tower; the entrance on the south is 
through a rich Norman doorway. 

ASHBY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union and 
hundred of MUTFORD and LOTHINGLAND, E. division 
of SUFFOLK, 6 miles (N. W.) from Lowestoft ; contain- 
ing, with the chapelry of Adstone, 53 inhabitants, and 
comprising 1003 acres. The living is a discharged rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 6, and in the gift 
of the Rev. George Anguish : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 205, and the glebe consists 
of about 22 acres. The church is a small thatched 
building, having a tower circular at the base, and octan- 
gular above. 

ASHBY, CANONS (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of DAVENTRY, hundred of GREENS-NORTON, S. division 
of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 8 miles (W. by N.) 
from Towcester ; containing 252 inhabitants. The parish 
consists of 3070a. 29/>., of which 1715a. 29/>. are in the 
division of the parish, exclusively of the chapelry of Ad- 
stone, and a portion is occupied by a well-wooded park. 
Here was anciently a priory of Black canons, founded 
about the time of John, the revenue of which, at the 
dissolution, was 127. 19. : in the alienation no endow- 
ment was reserved for the service of the church, and 
consequently there is now no incumbency. 

ASHBY, CASTLE (ST. MARY MAGDALENE), a parish, 
in the union of HARDINGSTONE, hundred of WYMMERS- 
LEY, S. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 8 miles 
(E. by S.) from Northampton ; containing 172 inhabit- 
ants. It appears to derive the prefix to its name from 
an ancient castle which is thought to have stood near 
the site of the present magnificent mansion of the Mar- 
quess of Northampton, where the foundation stones of 
a large building have been discovered. The parish com- 
prises 1889a. 2r., of which the greater part is arable; 
the soil is a strong clay, the sub-soil limestone, in some 
parts gravel. The living is a rectory, valued in the 

M 



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king's books at 17. Q. 7., and in the gift of the Mar- 
quess : the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 237. 1 8. 2., and the glebe consists of 120 acres. The 
church forms a picturesque object in his lordship's 
grounds, and is principally in the decorated style of 
English architecture ; the north entrance is through a 
beautiful Norman arch in good preservation. Some 
skeletons and warlike weapons of an early date have 
been dug up in the neighbourhood. 

ASHBY, COLD (ST. DENIS), a parish, in the union 
of BRIXWORTH, hundred of GUILSBOROUGH, S. division 
of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 11^ miles (N. W. by N.) 
from Northampton ; containing 443 inhabitants. This 
parish, which comprises by computation 2077 acres, is 
situated on a verdant tract of elevated ground, and 
bounded on the north-east by the road from Northamp- 
ton to Leicester ; and from the bold declivity terminat- 
ing the lofty ridge upon which the village stands, 
extensive and beautiful prospects are obtained of the 
surrounding country. The living is a vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 6. 0. 5. ; net income, 230 ; 
patron and incumbent, Rev. W. Mousley 5 impropriators, 
the family of Buxton : the glebe consists of about 120 
acres of good arable land. The church was repaired 
and repewed in 1840, at which time the incumbent pre- 
sented a new organ and two stained-glass windows. 
Here is a school endowed with 18 per annum. Richard 
Knolles, the historian of the Turkish Empire, was born 
here in 1540. 

ASHBY-DE-LA-LAUNDE (Sr. HYBALD), a parish, 
in the union of SLEAFORD, wapentake of FLAXWELL, 
parts of KESTEVEN, county of LINCOLN, 6 miles (N. 
by W.) from Sleaford ; containing 157 inhabitants. It 
comprises 2580a. 3r., of which 2296 acres are arable, 
222 grass, and 62 woodland, &c. The living is a dis- 
charged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 6. 8. 4. ; 
net income, 299 ; patron and impropriator, Rev. 
John King. The tithes were commuted for land and a 
money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1807. 

ASHBY-DE-LA-ZOUCH (ST. HELEN), a market- 
town, parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of 
WEST GOSCOTE, N. division of the county of LEICESTER, 
18 miles (N. W. by W.) from Leicester, and 1 15 (N. W. by 
N.) from London ; containing, with part of the chapelry 
of Blackfordby, 5652 inhabitants. The name appears 
to be derived from the Saxon Asc, an ash, and bye, a 
habitation : it received the adjunct, by which it is dis- 
tinguished from other towns of the same name, from the 
family of La Zouch, in whose possession it continued 
from the latter part of the twelfth to the close of the 
fourteenth century. Sir William Hastings, created 
Baron Hastings by Edward IV., and who was beheaded 
by Richard III., built a strong castle here in the reign 
of the former monarch, in which Mary, Queen of Scots, 
while in the custody of the Earl of Huntingdon, was for 
some time kept in confinement; and in this castle also 
Anne, consort of James I., and her son, Prince Henry, 
were magnificently entertained by the Earl of Hunting- 
don, on their journey from York to London in 1603. 
At the commencement of the parliamentary war, the 
Earl of Huntingdon was one of the first that appeared 
in arms for the king in Leicestershire, and Ashby Castle 
was garrisoned for his majesty by the earl's second son, 
Col. Henry Hastings, who was made general of the 
king's forces in the midland counties, and, for his ser- 
82 



vices to the royal cause was, in 1643, % created Baron 
Loughborough. The king was here, on his march to 
and from Leicester, in May and June 1645. After sus- 
taining a siege of several months from the army under 
Fairfax, Lord Loughborough surrendered the castle to 
Col. Needham, in February 1646, on honourable terms, 
the garrison being allowed to march out with all the 
honours of war. The castle was one of the fortresses 
demolished by order of a committee of the house of 
commons, about the end of the year 1649 : the re- 
maining portions form ana extensive and interesting 
mass of ruins, consisting of the great tower, the chapel, 
the kitchen tower, and a part evidently of much earlier 
date than the tower, as some portion of it was standing 
in the time of Richard I. The Marquess of Hastings 
has lately expended a considerable sum in repairing 
parts of these ruins, and arresting the progress of decay ; 
and on the site of a building which stood to the north 
of the castle, and at right angles with it, erected for the 
accommodation of the suite of James I., when on a visit 
to the Earl of Huntingdon, he has erected a handsome 
structure in the later English style, designated the manor- 
house. 

The TOWN, a great part of which was destroyed by fire 
in 1753, is pleasantly situated on the banks of the small 
river Gilwisthaw, at the north-western extremity of the 
county, and consists principally of one very spacious 
street, with two smaller streets extending in a parallel di- 
rection, and containing several substantial and well-built 
houses : it is lighted with gas, and measures have been 
lately taken for supplying it with water. The Ivanhoe 
baths, a splendid building erected in 1826, of the Doric 
order of architecture, are supplied from the neighbour- 
ing collieries with water, strongly impregnated with 
muriate of soda, containing, by ten or twelve degrees, a 
greater proportion of salt than sea water : the building 
consists of a centre, comprising the spacious pump- 
room, finished with rich architectural decorations, and 
over-arched with an elegant and lofty dome, and of two 
wings, one for gentlemen and the other for ladies, in each 
of which is a range of six baths, with douche, vapour, and 
shower varieties. There are lodging-houses, a handsome 
hotel, a neat theatre, and other sources of attraction, 
requisite in a place of fashionable resort. The manufac- 
ture of the coarser kinds of hosiery is carried on here : 
bricks are made to a considerable extent ; and in the 
neighbouring wolds, which abound with iron-stone and 
excellent coal, and which are now inclosed and popu- 
lous, extensive collieries have been opened by the Mar- 
quess of Hastings, and there is also a furnace for smelt- 
ing the iron-ore. A canal passes within three miles 
south-westward of the town, with which it is connected 
by a railroad, and, after continuing a course of more 
than thirty miles, unimpeded by a single lock, forms a 
junction with the Coventry canal. The market is on 
Saturday; and fairs are held on Shrove-Monday, Easter- 
Tuesday, Whit-Tuesday, the last Monday in Sept. and 
the 10th of Nov. for horses and cattle : this is stated to 
be the best market for strong horses in England. A 
court of requests has been established, under an act 
passed in 1838, which is held monthly, on Mondays, or 
oftener if necessary, before the ordinary commissioners, 
for the recovery of debts not exceeding 5, and once in 
every three months, or oftener, before a barrister of 
six years' practice, appointed under the act, for debts 



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above that amount and not exceeding 15. A con- 
stable and two headboroughs are appointed at the court 
leet of the lord of the manor. 

The parish comprises about 7000 acres. The living is 
a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
14. 10. 4.; net income, 417; patron and impropri- 
ator, Marquess of Hastings. 150 acres of land belong 
to the living in this parish, and 33 in that of Whitwick. 
The church is a spacious structure, in the decorated 
English style, and contains, in an adjoining sepulchral 
chapel, several monuments of the Huntingdon family, 
among which is one to the memory of Francis, Earl of 
Huntingdon, and his countess, deserving particular 
notice. A church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, has 
been erected at an expense of 3000, on a site given by' 
the marquess, and was consecrated on the 13th of Aug. 
1840 ; it is a handsome structure, and contains 900 
sittings, of which 600 are free. In the township of 
Blackfordby is a chapel of ease ; and there are places of 
worship for Baptists, the Connexion of the Countess of 
Huntingdon, Independents, and Wesleyans. The free 
grammar school was founded in 1567, by Henry, Earl 
of Huntingdon, and others, and endowed with 120 
houses and 75 acres of land : it provides instruction to 
about 120 boys, and has, jointly with the school at 
Derby, ten exhibitions of 10 each per annum to 
Emanuel College, Cambridge, founded by Francis Ash, 
merchant and citizen of London, a native of this town, 
with preference to the founder's relations. The Blue- 
coat school was instituted in 1669, and endowed with 
25 per annum, by Isaac Dawson ; and a Green-coat 
school was established and endowed by Alderman New- 
ton, of Leicester : they are now united, and contain 
about 50 boys. The Rev. Simeon Ash, a native of this 
town, gave 50 per annum, directing that 10 should 
be appropriated to the apprenticing of two boys yearly 
in some corporate town, and that the remainder should 
be distributed among the poor; and there are other 
schools, besides those already mentioned, carried on for 
the benefit of poor children. The union of which Ashby 
is the head comprises seventeen parishes or places in 
the county of Leicester, and eleven in the county of 
Derby, and contains a population of 14,234. A great 
number of Roman coins has been found here. Bishop 
Hall, an eminent divine and satirist, and Dr. John Bain- 
bridge, a celebrated astronomer and mathematician, were 
born at the town, the former in 1574, and the latter in 
1582. 

ASHBY- FOLVILLE (S T . MARY), a parish, in the 
union of MELTON-MOWBRAY, hundred of EAST Gos- 
COTE, N. division of the county of LEICESTER, 6 miles 
(S. W. byS.) from Melton- Mowbray ; containing, with 
thechapelry of Bardsby, 437 inhabitants. It comprises 
2S290. lr. 13p., of which 2298 acres are pasture, 461 
arable, and 70 woodland. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 9 ; net income, 
170; patron and incumbent, Rev. J. Brown ; impro- 
priators, the family of Johnston. Lord Carrington, in 
1673, founded and endowed an almshouse for seven 
poor men or women, the endowment of which produces 
135 per annum. 

ASHBY, ST. LEDGER'S (S T . MARY AND ST. LEOD- 

OARE), a parish, in the union of DAVENTRY, hundred of 

FAWSL.EY, S. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 

3^ miles (N.) from Daventry ; containing 257 inhabit- 

83 



ants. This parish, which comprises 1902a. 2r. 4p., is 
bounded on the east by the Roman Watling- street, and 
is situated near the London and Birmingham railway 
and the Union canal. The living is a discharged vicar- 
age, valued in the king's books at 6. 13. 4., and in the 
patronage of Mrs. Gaitskell and Lady Senhouse ; net 
income, 130, which chiefly arises from 66 acres of 
glebe. The church is in the later English style, and 
contains a richly ornamented screen and rood-loft, and 
in the windows are some remains of ancient painted 
glass. Sir William Catesby, favourite of Richard III., 
and owner of the manor, was buried here within the 
altar-rails under a marble slab, with a rich brass in fine 
preservation ; and Robert Catesby, the conspirator, of the 
time of James I., resided here, where he had property. 

ASHBY, MAGNA (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of LUTTERWORTH, hundred of GUTHLAXTON, S. division 
of the county of LEICKSTER, 4 miles (N. by E.) from 
Lutterworth ; containing 337 inhabitants, and comprising 
by measurement 2000 acres. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 7. 18. 11^. ; net income, 
120; patron and impropriator, Earl of Aylesford. 
The glebe consists of 49 acres. 

ASHBY-MEARS (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of WELLINGBOROUGH, hundred of HAMFORD- 
SHOE, N. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 4 
miles (W. by S.) from Wellingborough ; containing 496 
inhabitants. It comprises 1500 acres, of which more 
than two-thirds are arable land, and is beautifully situ- 
ated about a mile from the road between Wellingborough 
and Northampton, and two miles distant from the navi- 
gable river Nene. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 4. 13. 9. ; net income, 
235 ; patrons, alternately, Sir James Langham, Bart, 
and Dr. Hardy, master of Winchester College : the 
glebe consists of about 20 acres, with a house in good 
repair. The south side of the church has been rebuilt; 
the tower is very ancient. A free school is endowed 
with land assigned, on the inclosure of waste grounds, 
in lieu of property purchased with a bequest of 200 by 
Sarah Kinloch, in 1720 ; the rental is about 60. Land, 
also, producing about 30 per annum, is appropriated 
to the repair of highways and bridges. 

ASHBY, PARVA (ST. PETER), a parish, in the 
union of LUTTERWORTH, hundred of GUTHLAXTON, S. 
division of the county of LEICESTER, 3 miles (N. N. W.) 
from Lutterworth; containing 179 inhabitants. It 
comprises about 750 acres, of which three-fourths are 
pasture Jand ; the soif is clay and gravel. Within a 
mile and a half is a station on the Midland Counties' 
railway. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 5. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Crown ; 
net income, 98 : the glebe consists of 34 acres. Mrs. 
Goodacre, in 1830, bequeathed the whole of her pro- 
perty, amounting to 6574, after payment of all debts and 
legacies, to her niece, Mrs. Bowyer, in trust for charitable 
uses; who, in pursuance of the testator's will, expended 
a part of the money in erecting almshouses for eight 
widows, and two schoolrooms with dwelling-houses ; 
and laid out the residue of the property in the purchase 
of estates producing 1 50 a year for their endowment. 
On the inclosure of the parish in 1665, fourteen acres of 
land, yielding 28 per annum, were allotted to the 
reduction of the poor-rates, and three acres, producing 
7 per annum, to the repair of the church. 

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ASHBY-PUERORUM (Sr. ANDREW), a parish, in 
the union of HORNCASTLE, hundred of HILL, parts of 
LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 4^ rniles (E. N. E.) from 
Horncastle ; containing, with the hamlet of Stainsby, 
and Holbeck, extra-parochial, 111 inhabitants. Ashby 
Puerorvm, which comprises 1500 acres, chiefly arable, 
derives its affix from its connexion with the singing 
boys of Lincoln Cathedral, for whose benefit the great 
tithes are received. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 6. 3. 2. ; net income, 
118; patrons and impropriators, Masters of the Cho- 
risters of Lincoln Cathedral. 

ASHBY, WEST (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union and soke of HORNCASTLE, parts of LINDSEY, 
county of LINCOLN, if- mile (N.) from Horncastle; con- 
taining, with the hamlets of Farthorpe and Middle- 
thorpe, 534 inhabitants. It is pleasantly situated at the 
foot of the wolds, on the road from Horncastle to 
Louth, and is intersected in the western part by the 
river Bane, and in the eastern by the river Waring. The 
whole extent by measurement is 2900 acres, of which 
two-thirds are arable, and one-third meadow and pas- 
ture ; the soil is extremely fertile. The village is one 
of the most pleasing in the county, remarkable for the 
neatness of its buildings, the excellence of the roads 
leading to it, and the beauty of the surrounding scenery. 
The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 54 ; 
patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Carlisle. The 
church is a handsome edifice in the later English style, 
with a square embattled tower, and partly mantled with 
ivy. 

ASHCHURCH (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the 
union, and Lower division of the hundred of TEWKES- 
BURY, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 2 
miles (E. N. E.) from Tewkesbury ; containing, with the 
tythings of Aston-upon-Carron, Fiddington with Natton, 
Northway with Newton, and Pamington, 743 inhabitants. 
This parish, of which the name was originally East- 
church, from its relative situation to the church of 
Tewkesbury, is on the road from Tewkesbury to Stow, 
and comprises by computation 3150 acres. One of the 
first-class stations on the Birmingham and Gloucester 
railway is situated close to the village. The living is a per- 
petual curacy ; net income, 48 ; patron and incumbent, 
Rev. J. B. Skipper. The tithes were partially commuted 
for land, under an inclosureact, in 1811 ; the glebe con- 
sists of about 25 acres. The church is a handsome edifice, 
chiefly in the English style, with a square embattled 
tower, crowned with pinnacles ; the south entrance is 
by a Norman porch of elegant design. Mrs. Smithsend 
bequeathed 400, appropriating 7. 7. per annum to the 
Sunday school, and the remainder to the purchasing of 
blankets for distribution annually among the poor. A 
spring resembling the Cheltenham waters was discovered 
a few years since. 

ASHCOMBE, a parish, in the union of ST. THOMAS, 
hundred of EXMINSTER, Wouford and S. divisions of 
DEVON, 2 miles (E.) from Chudleigh ; containing 297 
inhabitants. This parish, situated near the sea-coast, 
comprises 2000 acres by survey, of which 500 acres of 
common and waste have recently been planted ; the re- 
mainder is arable, pasture, and orchard : the soil is a 
red loam. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 18, and in the patronage of the Crown : the 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 242, 
84 



and the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church, a cruciform 
structure, in the early arid decorated English styles, was 
dedicated 22nd Nov. 1259 ; it contains many ancient 
stalls of carved oak. During the recent repairs part of 
an old breviary was found between the ceiling and the 
roof, written in the reign of Richard II. ; it is now in 
the British Museum. Here are two charity schools. 

ASHCOTT (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
BRIDGWATER, hundred of WHITLEY, W. division of 
SOMERSET, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Glastonbury; con- 
taining, with the hamlet of Pedwell, 843 inhabitants. 
This parish, which is bounded on the south by the 
Polden hills, and intersected by the road from Glaston- 
bury to Bridgwater, formerly belonged to the abbey of 
Glastonbury. A fair for cattle is held on Jan. 9th. The 
living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of 
Shapwick : the impropriate tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 158. 16., and the vicarial for 155, 
and 9. 10. are paid to the rector of Walton-cum-Street j 
the glebe consists of 45 acres. There is a place of worship 
for Wesleyans, In 1737 Richard Miles bequeathed a 
sum of money, since vested in land, now producing 70 
per annum, which is distributed among the poor. 

ASHDON (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
SAFFRON-WALDEN, hundred of FRESHWELL, N. division 
of ESSEX, 3f- miles (N. E. by E.) from Saffron-Walden j 
comprising by computation 3681 acres, and containing, 
with the hamlet of Little Bartlow, 1164 inhabitants. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
28. 3. 4.5 net income, 691 5 patrons, Master and 
Fellows of Caius College, Cambridge. The church, 
situated on an eminence, is a spacious and ancient 
structure, with a low square tower surmounted by a 
small spire covered with lead : the parsonage-house, a 
handsome residence, about a quarter of a mile to the 
north, is pleasantly situated on rising ground. There is 
a national school, built in 1833, at an expense of 316. 
There are four large barrows, commonly called Bartlow- 
hills, and three small ones in front of them, in the 
parish. 

ASHE, a tything, in the parish of STOURPAIN, union 
of BLANDFORD, hundred of PIMPERNE, Blandford divi- 
sion of DORSET; containing 64 inhabitants. 

ASHE (HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in the union of 
WHITCHURCH, hundred of OVERTON, Kingsclere and 
N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON, 5^ miles 
(E. N. E.) from Whitchurch ; comprising by computa- 
tion 1667 acres, and containing 160 inhabitants. The liv- 
ing is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 9. 1 1. 65. ; 
net income, 350 j patron, W. H. Beach, Esq. : the 
glebe consists of about 32 acres. 

ASHELDHAM (ST. LAWRENCE), a parish, in the 
union of MALDON, hundred of DENGIE, S. division of 
ESSEX, 2 miles (N. E.) from Southminster ; containing 
219 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the 
sea-shore, comprises an area of about 3 square miles. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 16. 13.4.; patron, Bishop of London; ap- 
propriators, Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 408. 10., and 
there are 40 acres of glebe. The church is a plain build- 
ing, consisting of a nave and chancel, with a low square 
tower. 

ASHELWORTH (ST. ANDREW, or ST. BARTHOLO- 
MEW), a parish, in the union of GLOUCESTER, Upper 



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division of the hundred of BERKELEY, though locally in 
the hundred of DUDSTONE and KING'S BARTON, W. 
division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 5^ miles (N. by 
W.) from Gloucester ; containing 594 inhabitants. It is 
skirted on the south-east by the navigable river Severn, 
and comprises about 1600 acres, of which two-thirds are 
pasture, and one-third arable. Several parts of the 
manor-house display considerable antiquity ; and the 
parsonage, now a farm-house, affords a peculiarly fine 
specimen of wood-work. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 10. 2. 11.; net 
income, 187 ; patron, Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. 
The tithes were commuted for land and an annual 
money-payment, under an inclosure act, in 1797 The 
church consists of a nave, south aisle, and two chancels, 
with a tower and spire, chiefly in the later English style. 

ASHEN, a parish, in the union of RISBRIDGE, hun- 
dred of HINCKFORD, N. division of ESSEX, 2^ miles 
(S. W. by S.) from Clare ; comprising by measurement 
1574 acres, and containing 321 inhabitants. The village 
is pleasantly situated on elevated ground, commanding 
fine prospects ; and the parish is richly wooded. John 
Elwes, celebrated for his great wealth and penurious 
habits, was proprietor of the manor of Ashen, to which 
he succeeded on the decease of his uncle, Sir Harvey 
Elwes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books 
at 8, and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of 
the duchy of Lancaster : the tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 390, and there are 16 acres of 
glebe. The church, consisting of a nave and chancel, is 
an edifice of small dimensions, chiefly of stone, with a 
square embattled tower, and contains several monu- 
ments of great antiquity. According to Bishop Tanner, 
here was a priory of Augustine Friars, in the seventeenth 
of Edward II. 

ASHENDON (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
AYLESBURY, hundred of ASHENDON, county of BUCK- 
INGHAM, 6^ miles (N.) from Thame ; containing, with 
the hamlet of Pollicot, 312 inhabitants. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, with that of Dorton annexed ; net in- 
come, 106; patrons, Dean and Canons of Christ- 
Church, Oxford. The church formerly contained several 
lofty and elegant marble monuments to the ancient 
family of Falconer, of Ashendon, which have long since 
been removed : in a large recess of the south wall, under 
an ornamented arch, to the left of the communion table, 
is the recumbent effigy of a crusader with chain mail. 

ASHERIDGE, a hamlet, in the parish of CHESHAM, 
union of AMERSHAM, hundred of BURNHAM, county of 
BUCKINGHAM ; containing 129 inhabitants. 

ASHFIELD, with RUTHALL, a township, in the pa- 
rish of PRIOR'S-DITTON, union of BRIDGENORTH, hun- 
dred of MUNSLOW, S. division of SALOP, 8f miles (W. 
S. W.) from Bridgenorth ; containing 55 inhabitants. 

ASHFIELD (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BOSMERE and CLAYDON, hundred of THREDLING, E. 
division of SUFFOLK, 2^ miles (E.) from Debenham ; 
comprising 1565a. 2r. 19/>., and containing, with the 
hamlet of Thorpe, 343 inhabitants. The living is a per- 
petual curacy ; net income, 53 ; patron and impro- 
priator, Lord Henniker, who has commuted the tithes 
for a rent- charge of 465. The glebe comprises three 
acres, with a small cottage. The church has long been 
dilapidated, though parts of the walls and of the steeple 
remain : the cemetery is still used for interment. There 
85 



is a chapel of ease at Thorpe, in the English style, with 
a round tower, which is very old; it was repaired by 
George Pitt, Esq., in 1739. There is also a burial-ground 
at Thorpe. 

ASHFIELD, GREAT (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of STOW, hundred of BLACKBURN, W. division of 
SUFFOLK, 5 miles (E. S. E.) from Ixworth ; containing 
396 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net 
income, 54 ; patron and impropriator, Lord Thurlow, 
whose ancestor, the lord chancellor, was born here in 
1732. The church is in the early and decorated styles, 
and consists of a nave, chancel, and north aisle, with a 
square tower, surmounted by a small spire. Nicholas 
Firmage, by his will dated in 1620, gave, for a minister 
to preach a sermon every Sunday forenoon, lands of 
which four-fifths of the rents are now paid to a lecturer. 

ASHFORD, a chapelry, in the parish and union of 
BAKEWELL, hundred of HIGH PEAK, N. division of the 
county of DERBY, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Bakewell ; 
containing 950 inhabitants, and comprising 2562a. Ir. 
13p. The village is pleasantly situated in a vale watered 
by the river Wye, over which are three stone bridges. 
Mills for sawing and polishing marble, being the first 
established for that purpose in England, were erected 
on its banks in 1786, and are supplied from the cele- 
brated quarries of black marble in the vicinity. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 102 ; patron, 
Vicar of Bakewell ; appropriators, Dean and Chapter of 
Lichfield. The chapel, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, is 
in various styles, part being early English ; the first 
erection was a chantry, established here by Godfrey, 
son of Wenun Wyn, in 1257- There is a place of wor- 
ship for General Baptists ; another, originally founded 
by the nonconformist divine, William Bagshaw, styled 
"the Apostle of the Peak," has been subsequently used 
by different sects. A school endowed with 8. 13. 4. 
per annum, is further supported by a donation of 20 
from the Duke of Devonshire. Edward Plantagenet, 
Earl of Kent, resided in a mansion near the church, of 
which there are no vestiges, except the moat that sur- 
rounded it. 

ASHFORD (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
BARNSTAPLE, hundred of BRAUNTON, Braunton and N. 
divisions of DEVON, 2 miles (N. W.) from Barnstaple; 
containing 174 inhabitants. This parish, situated on 
the navigable river Taw, by which it is bounded on the 
south, comprises by measurement 330 acres, two-thirds 
of which are arable, and the remainder grazing, meadow, 
and orchard. The living is a discharged vicarage, en- 
dowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's 
books at 8. 13. 9.: it is in the patronage of the Crown, 
and the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 85, with a glebe of 7 acres. A school is supported 
by voluntary contributions. 

ASHFORD (ST. MARY), a market-town, parish, and 
the head of the union of WEST ASHFORD, in the hundred 
of CHART and LONGBRIDGE, lathe of SCRAY, E. division 
of KENT, 20 miles (S. E. by E.) from Maidstone, and 54 
(E. S. E.) from London ; containing 30S2 inhabitants. 
This place, originally Asscheford, rose from the ruins of 
Great Chart, an ancient market-town, which gave name 
to the hundred, and was destroyed during the Danish 
wars. The town, which is a liberty of itself, is situated 
on an eminence rising from the northern bank of the 
small river Stour, over which is a bridge of one arch : 



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the houses are modern and well built, and the prin- 
cipal street, which is nearly half a mile long, is 
lighted. The turnpike-roads from London to Hythe, 
and from Canterbury to Rye, in the county of Sussex, 
pass through it. A suite of assembly-rooms has been 
erected on the site of the ancient manor and market- 
house, in which assemblies occasionally take place ; 
there are two subscription libraries, and races are held 
annually for one day. The only branch of manufacture 
is that of linen, which is carried on to a small extent. 
The market is on Tuesday and Saturday ; there is a 
cattle-market on the first and third Tuesday, in every 
month ; and fairs are held on May 17th, Sept. 9th, and 
Oct. 24th, for general merchandize, and in the first 
week in Aug. for wool. A new turnpike-road, in a more 
direct line than the old road, has lately been completed 
between the place and Canterbury ; and the South- 
Eastern railway passes near it. A court leet is held 
annually, at which a constable, borough-holder, and 
other officers are appointed. 

The parish comprises 2800a. 3r. 17/>-> of which about 
92 acres are roads, waste lands, and the town. The 
LIVING is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
18. 4. 2.; net income, 460 ; patrons and appropri- 
ators, Dean and Chapter of Rochester : the glebe com- 
prises about 14 acres. The church, formerly collegiate, 
is a spacious and handsome cruciform structure, in the 
later English style, with a lofty and elegant tower rising 
from the centre, and having at the southern entrance a 
fine Norman arch : it was rebuilt in the reign of Ed- 
ward IV., by Sir John Fogge, Knt., who erected the 
beautiful tower, and founded the college for a master, 
two chaplains, and two secular clerks. In a small 
chapel adjoining the south-western transept are three 
sumptuous monuments of variegated marble, to the 
memory of the Smyths of Westenhanger, and one to 
the Duchess of Athol. There are places of worship for 
Particular Baptists, the Society of Friends, the Connexion 
of the Countess of Huntingdon, and Wesleyans. The 
free grammar school was founded in 1636, by Sir Nor- 
ton Knatchbull, who endowed it with 30 per annum, 
and vested the appointment of a master in his own 
family ; and national schools are supported by subscrip- 
tion, and by a bequest in land, producing 35 a year, 
from Dr. Turner, in 1702. The poor law union of West 
Ashford comprises 12 parishes and places, and contains 
a population of 11,329. A mineral spring was disco- 
vered, a few years ago, in a field called Sparrows gar- 
dens. Robert Glover, an industrious antiquary of the 
sixteenth century ; his nephew, Thomas Miller, eminent 
as a herald and genealogist ; and Dr. John Wallis, the 
celebrated mathematician, were natives of the place. 
Ashford confers the inferior title of Baron on the family 
of Keppel, Earls of Albemarle. 

ASHFORD (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union of 
STAINES, hundred of SPELTHORNE, county of MIDDLE- 
SEX, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Chertsey ; containing 
524 inhabitants. It comprises 1378a. 3r. I4p., of which 
the greater portion is arable, and about 100 acres mea- 
dow and pasture ; the surface is generally flat, and the 
soil a gravel resting on blue clay ; the surrounding 
scenery is pleasing, and is enlivened by several hand- 
some residences. The living is annexed to the vicarage 
of Staines; impropriator, J. Irving Esq. The great tithes 
were commuted in 1809 for land and a money payment, 
86 



under an inclosure act; and the vicarial tithes have since 
been commuted for a rent- charge of 100 ; there is a glebe 
of 26 acres. The church is a small edifice, built in 
1796, at the expense of the principal inhabitants. A Sun- 
day school is endowed with the interest of 438. 3. &., 
three and a half per cent, consols. 

ASHFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of ILTON, union 
of CHARD, hundred of ABDICK and BULSTONE, W. divi- 
sion of SOMERSET ; containing 13 inhabitants. 

ASHFORD-BOWDLER (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in 
the union of LUDLOW, hundred of MUNSLOW, S. divi- 
sion of SALOP, 2 miles (S. by E.) from Ludlow ; con- 
taining 96 inhabitants. This parish, situated on the 
river Teme, and intersected by the road from Ludlow to 
Worcester, comprises about 370 acres, of which two- 
thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture. The liv- 
ing is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 55 ; patron, C. 
Walker, Esq., of Ashford Court. 

ASHFORD-CARBONELL (S T . MARY), a parish, in 
the union of LUDLOW, partly in the hundred of MUN- 
SLOW, but chiefly in that of STOTTESDEN, S. division of 
SALOP, 3^ miles (S. S. E.) from Ludlow; containing 
266 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, annexed to 
that of Little Hereford. 

ASHFORDBY, or ASFORDBY (ALL SAINTS), a parish, 
in the union of MELTON-MOWBRAY, hundred of EAST 
GOSCOTE, N. division of the county of LEICESTER, 3 
miles (W.) from Melton-Mowbray ; containing 482 in- 
habitants. It comprises by measurement 1800 acres, 
of which two-thirds are grazing, and one-third arable 
land, and is situated on the river Wreak, which com- 
municates with the Leicester and Melton-Mowbray navi- 
gation, and over which is a bridge. The living is a rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 15. 11. 8., and in 
the patronage of the Rev. A. Burnaby, the present in- 
cumbent, and his two sisters, with a net income of 
455 : the tithes were commuted for land in 1761, 
under an inclosure act. In 1769, Morris Cam left 100 
towards the support of a school ; and from other be- 
quests a small sum is distributed among the poor. 

ASH-HOLM, a township, in the parish of LAMBLEY, 
union of HALTWHTSTLE, W. division of TINDALE ward, 
S. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 19^ miles (W. by S.) 
from Hexham. This place, which is snugly seated under 
banks clothed with luxuriant woods, and where the 
course of the Tyne is suddenly intercepted by a high 
promontory called the Shafthill, was the seat of the 
ancient family of Wallace, whose honourable career and 
success in life have enabled them to extend their pro- 
perty in the county far beyond the limits of this their 
patrimonial estate : James Wallace was attorney-general 
in 1780, and his son Thomas also filled offices of state, 
for which he was, in 1828, created Baron Wallace of 
Knaresdale. The Romans had a signal station here, the 
area of which is rectangular, but only 35 yards by 24, 
being defended on three sides by steep escarpments, and 
on the east, and partly on the south, being cut off from 
the main land by a ditch 60 feet wide and 25 deep. 
Here is a good mill-stone quarry. 

ASHILL (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the union of 
SWAFFHAM, hundred of WAYLAND, W. division of NOR- 
FOLK, 3 miles (N. W.) from Watton ; containing 637 
inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2991 acres, 
of which 236/ are arable, and 584 meadow and pas- 
ture; the soil is in some parts light and gravelly, and 



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in others strong and clayey. The living is a rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 19. 13. 6. ; patron 
and incumbent, Rev. B. Edwards. The tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 979 ; a rent-charge 
of 21 is paid to the rector of Great Cressingham ; and 
there are 30 acres of glebe, with a good glebe-house. 
The church is chiefly in the later style of English archi- 
tecture. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 
At the time of the inclosure 73 acres of land were 
allotted to the poor. 

ASHILL, a parish, in the union of CHARD, hundred 
of ABDICK and BULSTONE, W. division of SOMERSET, 
4 miles (N. W.) from Ilminster ; containing 438 inhabit- 
ants. This place, which is situated on the road from 
Bridport to Taunton and Tiverton, belonged in the reign 
of Edward II. to Thomas de Multon, who obtained for 
the inhabitants the grant of a weekly market on Wed- 
nesday, and of fairs on the festivals of the Virgin Mary, 
St. Simon, and St. Jude. A portion of ground, which 
for many years has been contested by the parishes of 
Ashill and Broadway, was in 1685 the scene of a con- 
flict between Monmouth on his retreat from Sedgemoor 
and a party of the king's forces. The parish comprises 
by admeasurement 1790 acres of profitable land, under 
good cultivation ; the scenery is pleasantly diversified, 
and in some parts enriched with wood. A fair is still 
held in the village on the Wednesday in Easter-week. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 6. 0. 10.; patron, the Prebendary of Ashill 
in the Cathedral of Wells, whose appropriate tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 204. 10. 8., and 
who has a glebe of 60 acres ; the vicarial tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 118. 13. 4., and 
there are 24 acres of land attached, at Bewley Down, 
Dorset. There are some remains of an ancient seat of 
Nicholas Wadham, founder of Wadham College, Ox- 
ford ; and a chalybeate spring is carefully preserved. 

ASHINGDON (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of ROCHFORD, S. division of ESSEX, 2^ 
miles (N. by W.) from Rochford ; containing 119 in- 
habitants. This place is thought by the best writers 
to have been the scene of the battle of Assandune, in 
1016, in which Canute the Dane, after a sanguinary 
contest, vanquished the Saxons under Edmund Iron- 
side. The parish comprises Il65a. Ir. lip. The living 
is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at 
8. 13. 4. ; patron and incumbent, Rev. John Nottidge, 
whose tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
285, and who has 20 acres of glebe. A national school 
for Ashingdon and South Fambridge was established in 
1832. 

ASHINGTON, with SHEEPWASH, a township, in the 
parish of BOTHAI,, union of MORPETH, E. division of 
MORPETH ward, N. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 4^ 
miles (E. by N.) from Morpeth ; containing 76 inhabit- 
ants. The persons who are first named in the records 
as connected with the property here, are the Morwicks, 
Lumleys, and Fitzhnghs ; the family of Essendon (the 
modern Ashington) are mentioned as lords of the 
manor at the close of the 13th century ; and the most 
important landowners since that period have been the 
families of Coventre and Fenwick, from whom the place 
has descended to the Duke of Portland. The township 
comprises 583 acres of land, of which 444 are tillage, 
112 grass, and 27 wood; the grounds are very beautiful 
87 



in some places by the side of the river Wansbeck, which 
is navigable for keels and small boats as far as Sheep- 
wash, where it is crossed by a bridge. The tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 109. 6. 

ASHINGTON (ST. FINCENT), a parish, in the union 
of YEOVIL, hundred of STONE, W. division of SOMER- 
SET, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Ilchester ; comprising by 
computation 560 acres, and containing 71 inhabitants. 
The parish is finely wooded and fertile, the land rising 
gently from the river Yeo, which bounds it on the east 
and north; and looking over a rich and extensive vale, 
the view is terminated at unequal distances by a bold 
and beautiful range of hills from the south-east to the 
north-west. The living is a discharged rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 6. 3. 4., and in the patronage of 
the Rev. John Williams : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 125, and there are 32 acres 
of glebe, with a house. The church is a small neat 
structure, having a turret with two bells ; at the eastern 
end, on the outside, is a small niche, wherein are three 
human figures, which admit a conjecture that they refer 
to the history of St. Vincent, who was burnt alive at 
Valentia, in Spain, in the year 304. 

ASHINGTON cum BUNCTON (ST. PETER AND ST. 
PAUL), a parish, in the union of THAKEHAM, hundred 
of WEST GRINSTEAD, rape of BRAMBER, W. division 
of SUSSEX, 5 miles (N. W.) from Steyning, on the road 
from London to Worthing ; containing 282 inhabitants. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
8. 5.; net income, 189; patron, Duke of Norfolk. 
The church is in the later English style, and has some 
fragments of stained-glass in its windows. At Buncton 
is a chapel of ease, with remains of Norman arches on 
the outside of the chancel. 

ASHLEY cum SILVERLEY (ST. MARY), a parish, in 
the union of NEWMARKET, hundred of CHEVELEY, 
county of CAMBRIDGE, 3^ miles (E. by S.) from New- 
market ; containing 417 inhabitants. These parishes, 
which are consolidated into one, comprise 21 43a.3r. 25p. 
At Silverley are only a farm-house and two cottages, 
with the tower of the ruined church ; and at Ashley 
are the ruins of an old church situated in the burial- 
ground. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Sil- 
verley annexed, valued in the king's books at 8 ; 
patron, Marquess of Bute ; net income, 150, arising 
out of 272 acres of land allotted in lieu of tithes on the 
inclosure. The church is a small plain edifice. 

ASHLEY, a township, in the parish of BOWDON, 
union of ALTRINCHAM, hundred of BUCKLOW, N. divi- 
sion of CHESHIRE, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Nether 
Knutsford ; containing 377 inhabitants. Ashley Hall, 
the ancient manorial mansion, which is approached by 
a fine avenue of stately walnut trees, is remarkable for 
containing eleven original portraits of gentlemen of this 
county, ancestors of the Grosvenors, Cholmondeleys, 
and other families, who formed a club during the pro- 
gress of the Pretender through the north, in 1715, 
when the expediency of joining his standard was de- 
bated, and the casting vote against the measure was given 
by Thomas Asheton, the owner of the mansion. The 
tithes have been commuted for rent- charges, amounting 
to 205, of which 197 are payable to the Bishop of 
Chester, and 8 to the vicar of the parish. 

ASHLEY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
MARKET-HARBOROUGH, hundred of CORBY, N. division 



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of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 5 miles (W. by S.) 
from Rockingham ; containing 323 inhabitants. On 
the north the parish is bounded by the river Welland, 
which separates it from Leicestershire ; and it consists 
of H82a. 2r. 20p., of a rich and fertile soil. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 17 ; net 
income, 320 ; patron and incumbent, Rev. Richard 
Farrer. The tithes were commuted for land and a 
money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1 806. The 
produce of an estate, amounting to 14 per annum, is 
applied towards repairing the church and highways, 
and the relief of the poor. 

ASHLEY (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
STOCKBRIDGE, hundred of KING'S SOMBOURN, Win- 
chester and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMP- 
TON, 3| miles (S. S. E.) from Stockbridge ; containing 
102 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1857 
acres, of which 1270 are arable, 400 wood, and 187 
pasture, waste, &c. j the soil rests chiefly on chalk. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
7. 16. 3. ; patron and incumbent, Rev. R. C. Taunton, 
who supports a school. The tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 350, and the glebe comprises 
about 40 acres. The church is an ancient and curious, 
but small structure, in the early English style. There 
are vestiges of several Roman camps, and a circular 
intrenchment of considerable dimensions, supposed to 
be British, or Danish. 

ASHLEY, a tything, in the parish of MILTON, union 
of LYMINGTON, hundred of CHRISTCHURCH, Lyming- 
ton and S. divisions of HANTS ; containing 552 inhabit- 
ants. 

ASHLEY (Sr. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in the 
union of MARKET-DRAYTON, N. division of the hundred 
of PIREHILL and of the county of STAFFORD, 6 miles 
(N. N. E.) from Market-Drayton ; containing 853 in- 
habitants. It comprises 2800a. 3r. 32p. of fertile land. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
10. 2. 8^., and in the patronage of Thomas Kinnersley 
and H. C. Meynell, Esqs. : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 370, and the glebe com- 
prises 40 acres. The church is a handsome structure 
in the early English style, and contains splendid monu- 
ments and effigies of the six Lords Gerard, the last of 
whom died in 1807 ; and also an elegant monument by 
Chantrey to Thomas Kinnersley, Esq., father of the 
present patron. There are places of worship for Wes- 
leyans and Roman Catholics. A national school is 
supported by subscription, and there is a school in 
connexion with the Roman Catholic chapel. 

ASHLEY, (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
TETBURY, hundred of MALMESBURY, Malmesbury and 
Kingswood, and N. divisions of WILTS, 5 miles (N. by 
W.) from Malmesbury ; containing 96 inhabitants. The 
living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's 
books at Q. 16. 5^., and in the patronage of the 
Crown, in right of the duchy of Lancaster : the tithes 
have been commuted for a rent- charge of 210, and 
there are 34 acres of glebe. A school is chiefly sup- 
ported by Mr. Bucknall Estcourt and the rector. 

ASHLEY GREEN, a hamlet, in the parish of 
CHESHAM, union of AMERSHAM, hundred of BURNHAM, 
county of BUCKINGHAM ; containing 536 inhabitants. 

ASHLEY-HA.Y, a township, in the union of BEL- 
PER, parish of WIRKSWORTH, hundred of APPLETREE, 
88 



S. division of the county of DERBY, If mile (S.) from 
Wirksworth ; containing 272 inhabitants. 

ASHLEY LODGE, an extra-parochial liberty, with 
those oFGodshill Wood and New Grounds, in the union 
and hundred of FORDINGBRIDGE, Ringwood and S. 
divisions of HANTS, 3^ miles (E.) from Fordingbridge, 
on the borders, and partly within the limits, of the New 
Forest ; containing 265 inhabitants. 

ASHLEY, NORTH, a tything, in the parish, union, 
and hundred of RINGWOOD, Ringwood and S. divisions 
of HANTS ; containing 237 inhabitants. 

ASHLING, EAST, a tything, in the parish of 
FUNTINGTON, union of WESTBOURNE, hundred of 
BOSHAM, rape of CHICHESTER, W. division of SUSSEX ; 
containing 310 inhabitants. 

ASHLING, WEST, a tything, in the parish of 
FUNTINGTON, union of WESTBOURNE, hundred of 
BOSHAM, rape of CHICHESTER, W. division of SUSSEX ; 
containing 455 inhabitants. 

ASHMANHAUGH (Sr. SWITHJN), a parish, in the 
union of TUNSTEAD and HAPPING, hundred of TUN- 
STEAD, E. division of NORFOLK, 2 miles (E. by N.) from 
Coltishall ; containing 180 inhabitants. It comprises 
665a. 2r. 23p., of which 571 acres are arable, 29 pasture 
and meadow, and 37 woodland. The living is a per- 
petual curacy, in the patronage of Lady Preston ; net 
income, 42 ; appropriator, Bishop of Norwich, whose 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 145, 
and who has a glebe of 5^ acres. The church, which 
is chiefly in the early style, was thoroughly repaired 
and new-pewed, and the tower rebuilt, in 1840. The 
Misses Preston support a school. 

ASHMANSWORTH (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the 
union of KINGSCLERE, hundred of EVINGAR, Kingsclere 
and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON, 7 
miles (S. S. W.) from Newbury j comprising 1798 acres 
by measurement, and containing 220 inhabitants. The 
soil is strong clay, mixed with flint stones, and rests on 
chalk, the district being a portion of the high range of 
chalk hills which form the northern boundary of the 
South Downs. The living is annexed to the rectory of 
East Woodhay : the tithes have been commuted for 
371. 3. 4., and the glebe comprises 26 acres. A 
national school is supported by subscription. 

ASHMORE (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the union 
of SHAFTESBURY, hundred of CRANBORNE, Shaston 
division of DORSET, 5 miles (S. E.) from Shaftesbury ; 
containing 242 inhabitants. It comprises 2342 acres, 
of which the soil is heavy and flinty, and the ground 
elevated, rising 7*20 feet above the level of the sea. The 
living, which formerly belonged to the abbey of Tewkes- 
bury, is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
7. 19. 9?. ; net income, 389 ; patron, Rev. C. Chis- 
holme. The glebe consists of about 30 acres. The 
church, erected in 1433, is a plain edifice of stone and 
flint. 

ASHOLT, county of SOMERSET. See AISHOLT. 

ASHORN, a township, in the parish of NEWBOLD- 
PACEY, union of STRATFORD-ON-AVON, Warwick divi- 
sion of the hundred of KINGTON, S. division of the 
county of WARWICK, 6 miles (N. N. W.) from King- 
ton ; containing 274 inhabitants. 

ASHOVER (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union of 
CHESTERFIELD, partly in the hundred of WIRKSWORTH, 
but chiefly in that of SCARSDALE, N. division of the 



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county of DERBY, 7 miles (S. S. W.) from Chesterfield ; 
containing, with the chapelry of Deth\vick-Lea, and the 
hamlet of Holloway, 3482 inhabitants. This place, for- 
merly a market-town, occupies a pleasant site near the 
rivers Amber and Milntown, and within three miles of 
the North-Midland railway, and, according to Domes- 
day-book, had a church at the time of the Conquest. 
The parish comprises 9700a. 2r. 3fp., of which 62 acres 
are waste ; the soil is various, and the lands are in 
good cultivation. Coal, iron-stone, mill-stone, grit- 
stone, and lead-ore are found ; and the Gregory lead- 
mine, 300 yards deep, is said to have once been the 
richest in the kingdom, though its present produce is 
inconsiderable. The manufacture of stockings is carried 
on to a small extent, and the working of tambour lace 
affords employment to the greater part of the female 
population. Fairs for cattle and sheep are held on the 
25th of April and the 15th of Oct. Ashover is in the 
honour of Tutbury, duchy of Lancaster, and within the 
jurisdiction of a court held at Tutbury every third Tues- 
day, for the recovery of debts under 40s. : constables 
and other officers are appointed at the court leet of the 
lord of the manor. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 24. 3. 1^. ; net income, 481; 
patron, the Rev. Joseph Nodder. The tithes were com- 
muted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1776, and the 
glebe comprises 150 acres. The church is a spacious 
edifice, built in 141-9, with a very handsome spire, and 
contains a Norman font of curious design, and several 
monuments to the family of Babington. There are 
places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Method- 
ists ; and a school is endowed with 23 per annum. 

ASHOW (ST. MARY), a parish, in the Kenilworth 
division of the hundred of KNIGHTLOW, union, and 
S. division of the county of WARWICK, 2| miles (S. 
E. by E.) from Kenilworth ; containing 172 inhabitants. 
The parish contains by measurement 1000 acres, of 
which about 800 are arable and pasture, and 200 wood- 
land ; the soil is chiefly red sand and clay. It is inter- 
sected by the river Avon. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 6. 2. 1., and in the 
patronage of Lord Leigh : the tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 216. 17-, and the glebe 
consists of about 12 acres. 

ASHPERTON (ST. BARTHOLOMEW}, a parish, in the 
union of LEDBURY, hundred of RADLOW, county of 
HEREFORD, 5^ miles (N. W. by W.) from Ledbury ; 
containing 604 inhabitants. It comprises by measure- 
ment 1741 acres, and is intersected by the road from 
Leominster to Ledbury, and the new canal from Led- 
bury to Hereford. The living is annexed to the vicarage 
of Stretton-Grandsome : the tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 350. 15. ; and there is a quarter 
of an acre of glebe, on which a school-house for boys 
has been built by the present vicar. The parliamentary 
army was stationed at a place in the parish, still called 
Cromwell's Walls. 

ASHPRINGTON (ST. DAVID), a parish, in the 
union of TOTNES, hundred of COLERIDGE, Stanborough 
and Coleridge, and S. divisions of DEVON, 3 miles 
(S. E.) from Totnes ; containing 588 inhabitants. This 
parish, which comprises about 2380 acres, is intersected 
by the old road to Dartmouth, and washed by the Hare- 
burne and the Dart, which latter river brings up colliers 
and coasters : ochre and iron are frequently met with ; 
VOL. I. 89 



and slate, dunstone, and limestone abound. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 29. 1.8.; 
net income, 520 ; patron, Rev. G. T. Carwithen. The 
glebe consists of 25 acres. 

ASHREIGNEY, or RING'S ASH (S T . JAMES), a 
parish, in the union of TORRINGTON, hundred of NORTH 
TAWTON, South Molton and N. divisions of DEVON, 4 
miles (W. byS.) from Chulmleigh ; containing 1088 in- 
habitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 24, and in the patronage of the Rev. J. T. 
Johnson : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 450, and there are 70 acres of glebe. A 
national school is endowed with 10 per annum. 

ASHSTED, a hamlet, in the parish and union of 
ASTON, Birmingham division of the hundred of HEM- 
LINGFORD, N. division of the county of WARWICK. This 
place, which adjoins the town of Birmingham on the 
north-east, consists of several good streets of well-bxiilt 
houses, and some pleasant detached cottages and villas. 
At the extremity of Great Brooke-street are the Vaux- 
hall gardens, where concerts and displays of fireworks 
take place during the summer ; and in the same street 
are the barracks, erected soon after the Birmingham 
riots in 1791, a handsome range of building, with a rid- 
ing-school, hospital, and magazine, also a spacious area 
for the exercise of cavalry, and a smaller for parade. 
From its proximity to Birmingham, the hamlet partici- 
pates in the trade and manufactures of that town ; there 
are also a large glass-house, flour-mills, and various 
other works, with several wharfs on the line of the Bir- 
mingham canal. Adjoining the barracks is a proprietary 
episcopal chapel, dedicated to St. James, formerly the 
dwelling-house of Dr. Ash, from whom the hamlet takes 
its name. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net. income, 
210; patrons, the Bishop of Lichfield and others, as 
trustees. Here is a national school, towards the erection 
of which the Society granted 200. 

ASHTEAD (-Sr. GILES), a parish, in the union of 
EPSOM, Second division of the hundred of COPTHORNE, 
W. division of SURREY, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from 
Epsom ; containing 618 inhabitants. It comprises 
25l6a. 25p., and is pleasantly situated on the road from 
London, by Dorking, to Bognor and Worthing. A small 
fair is held on the 4th of May. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 13. 15. 5., and in the 
patronage of the Hon. Fulk Greville Howard and Hon. 
Mrs. Howard : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 549. 12. 6., and there are 12 acres of 
glebe. The church is a very neat building, beautifully 
situated in Ashtead Park. A charity school is endowed 
with 10 per annum, and a school on the national plan 
is chiefly supported by the Hon. Col. and Mrs. Howard. 
An hospital for six poor widows was founded by Lady 
Diana Fielding, and endowed with property producing 
32. 7. per annum. Here is a mineral spring, the 
water of which is similar to that of the Epsom wells. 
A Roman encampment may be traced round what is 
now the churchyard and part of Ashtead Park ; and the 
great Roman road by Noviomagus (now Woodcote Park) 
passes along the south side of the parish, and is called 
the " Stane-street causeway." Sir Robert Howard, the 
poet, resided here in the time of Charles II., by whom, 
it is said, he was often visited. 

ASHTON, a township, in the parish of TARVIN, 
union of GREAT BOUGHTON, Second division of the 

N 



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hundred of SDDISBURY, S. division of the county of 
CHESTER, 7\ rniles (E. N. E.) from Chester ; containing 
401 inhabitants, the tithes have been commuted for 
rent-charges amounting to 190. 10., of which 109 
are payable to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield, and 
81. 10. to the vicar of the parish. 

ASHTON (Sr. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in the 
union of ST. THOMAS, hundred of EXMINSTER, Teign- 
bridge and S. divisions of DEVON, 4 miles (N. by W.) 
from Chudleigh ; containing 319 inhabitants. It com- 
prises 1 726*0. 3r. 5p., of which about 200 acres are furze 
and fir plantations. The sudden inundations of the 
river Teign, which bounds the parish on the east, fre- 
quently occasion much damage. Several mines of man- 
ganese are worked by contractors from Cornwall, who 
pay to the lord of the manor a duty on the tonnage, 
and large quantities of the mineral are supplied to the 
Manchester and other manufacturers, for bleaching 
their goods. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 11. 10. 2^. ; patron and incumbent, 
Rev. George Ware, \4 T hose tithes have been commuted 
for a rent- charge of 256, and who has d glebe of 50 
acres. The church contains a very finely-carved wooden 
screen and rood-loft. 

ASHTON, with EYE-MORETON, a township, in the 
parish of EYE, union of LEOMINSTER, hundred of WOL- 
PHY, county of HEREFORD, 3|- miles (N. N. E.) from 
Leominster; containing 294 inhabitants. 

ASHTON, with LEA, COTTAM, and INGOL, a towii- 
ship, in the parish and union of PRESTON, hundred of 
AMOUNDERNESS, N. division of the county of LANCAS- 
TER, 2 miles (W. by N.) from Preston; containing 710 
inhabitants. 

ASHTON, with STODDAY, a township, in the parish 
and union of LANCASTER, hundred of LONSDALE, south 
of the Sands, N. division of the county of LANCASTER, 
3% miles (S. S. E.) from Lancaster ; containing 185 in- 
habitants. Ashton Hall, the property of the Duke of 
Hamilton, is a quadrangular edifice, with a projecting 
wing to the east, and a square tower with angular tur- 
rets on the west ; it was probably erected in the four- 
teenth century, but the numerous alterations and addi- 
tions which it has undergone, have left little of the 
ancient baronial mansion : the surrounding scenery is 
highly beautiful. The impropriate tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 22. 2. 1. A free school 
has an income of nearly 50 per annum. 

ASHTON (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of POTTERSPURY, hundred of CLELEY, S. division of 
the county of NORTHAMPTON, 7 miles (S. by E.) from 
Northampton ; containing 417 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is bounded on the south by the river Tow, com- 
prises by measurement 1100 acres of highly fertile land, 
and is situated near the Grand Junction canal, and in- 
tersected by the London and Birmingham railway. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 10, 
and in the patronage of the Crown ; net income, 275, 
arising from 235 acres of land, allotted in lieu of tithes 
oh the inclosure of the parish. The church is a very 
ancient structure. There is a place of worship for 
Baptists. 

ASHTON, a hamlet, in the parish of UFFORD, union 

of STAMFORD, soke of PETERBOROUGH, N. division of 

the county of NORTHAMPTON, 4^ miles (S. E.) from 

Stamford; containing 101 inhabitants. The tithes were 

90 



commuted for corn-rents, under an inclosure act, in 
1796. 

ASHTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of 
OUNDLE, hundred of POLEBROOK, N. division of the 
county of NORTHAMPTON, 1^ mile (E. by N.) from 
Oundle; containing 172 inhabitants, and comprising 
1308a. 3r. 20p. It is situated on the right bank of the 
river Nene, arid is intersected by the road from Ourtdle 
to Peterborough. A school was erected in 1708, by 
Elizabeth Creed, under the will of her daughter Jemima, 
who endowed it with land producing 44 per annum, 
and it has also a fund of 200 in the three per cent, 
consols. 

ASHTON, BLANK. See ASTON BLANK. 

ASHTON, a tything, in the parish and hundred of 
BISHOP'S-WALTHAM, union of DROXFORD, Droxford 
and N. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON ; con- 
taining 310 inhabitants. 

ASHTON, COLD (HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in the 
union of CHIPPING, hundred of PUCKLE-CHURCH, W. 
division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 5^ miles (N.) 
from Bath ; containing 414 inhabitants. In the memo- 
rable' battle of Lansdown, the parliamentarians, who 
had marched from Bath to attack the royalist forces in- 
trenched on Furze hill, were, after a severe conflict, 
defeated and driven up the valley of Ashton lodge, where 
in the hour of victory, the gallant Sir Beville Granville, 
who commanded the royalists, received a mortal wound, 
of which he expired in the rectory-house of this place. 
The parish is situated on the road from Bath to Glou- 
cester, and contains by measurement 2400 acres. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 17. 1.8.; 
net income, 492 ; patron, Rev. Edward Batchellor. 
The glebe consists of 88 acres. The church was erected 
in 1406, by Thomas Key, Esq., to perpetuate the me- 
mory of the founder, and keys of a durable material are 
carved over every window and door, and on many parts 
of the interior of the building. A school is partly sup- 
ported by subscription. The venerable Bishop Latimer 
was incumbent of the parish prior to his advancement 
to the episcopal dignity, and in the church is an ancient 
stone pulpit, in which he preached. The descendants of 
the celebrated Sir Richard Whittington, lord mayor of 
London in the years 1397, 1406, and 1419, reside here, 
in an old mansion bearing date 1664. 

ASHTON-GIFFORD, a township, in the parish of 
CODFORD-ST. PETER, union of WARMINSTER, hundred 
of HEYTESBURY, Warminster and S. divisions of WILTS, 
3 miles (S. E. by E.) from Heytesbury; containing 141 
inhabitants. 

ASHTON-IN-MACKERFIELD, a chapelry, in the 
parish of WINWICK, union of WIGAN, hundred of WEST 
DERBY, S. division of the county of LANCASTER, 7 miles 
(N. N. W.) from Warrington ; containing 6706 inhabit- 
ants. This chapelry comprises the townships of Ashton 
and Haydock, the former of which contains 5557. 2r. 5/>., 
with a population of 5410, and the latter 3105a. 39/>-, 
with a population of 1296 : one of the great lines of 
road from London to Edinburgh runs through the vil- 
lage, and other facilities for communication are furnished 
by the Sankey canal, the Leeds and Liverpool canal, and 
the Liverpool and Manchester railroad. The place has> 
been long famous for the manufacture of locks and 
hinges, and employment is also afforded to the inhabit- 
ants in several cotton and other manufactories, and in. 



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the working of extensive and valuable coal-mines. A 
fair is held on the 21st and 22nd of Sept. The living is 
a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the rector of 
Winwic-k, with a net income of 181, partly arising 
from 24 acres of glebe : the tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 600. The chapel, dedicated to St. 
Thomas, was rebuilt in 1715, enlarged in 1784, and 
again in 1815 ; and an additional chapel, dedicated to 
the Holy Trinity, has been lately erected at Downall 
Green, to which a district was assigned in 1838. There 
are places of worship for Roman Catholics, Unitarians, 
Quakers, Independents, and Wesleyans. The Sexeley 
Green free grammar school was founded, in 1588, by 
Robert Byrchall, and is endowed with 50 a year. 
Many curious fossils are found in the coal-mines. 

ASHTON-KEYNES (HOLY CROSS), a parish, in the 
union of CRICKLADE and WOOTTON-BASSET, hundred 
of HIGHWORTH, CRICKLADE, and STAPLE, Cricklade 
and N. divisions of WILTS, 4^ miles (W.) from Crick- 
lade ; containing, with the chapelry of Leigh, 1332 in- 
habitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 16; net income, 325 5 patron and impro- 
priator, J. Pitt, Esq. There is a chapel of ease at Leigh ; 
and a Lancasterian school, commenced in 1823, is partly 
supported by contributions. 

ASHTON, LONG (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union of BEDMINSTER, hundred of HARTCLIFFE with 
BEDMINSTER, E. division of SOMERSET, 3 miles (S. W. 
by W.) from Bristol ; containing, with the hamlets of 
Kingcot, Providence, Yanleigh, Bower-Ashton, and 
Rounham, 1926 inhabitants. It comprises by computa- 
tion 4112 acres, of which 1132 are arable, 2328 pasture, 
and 428 woodland, waste, &c. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 10. 17. 11.; 
net income, 117; patrons and impropriators, Sir J. 
Smyth, Bart, and W. G. Langton, Esq. There were 
formerly a chapel and a hermitage at Rownan Ferry, in 
the parish. In 1661, Francis Derrick gave a piece of 
land producing about 8 per annum ; in 1760, Anne 
Smyth left a rent-charge of 10; and, in 1822, John 
Stanton gave 100; which funds are applied towards 
the support of a school, further maintained by subscrip- 
tion. On the eastern point of Ashton hill are two in- 
trenchments, called Burwalls and Stokeleigh, now over- 
grown with wood, which appear to have been Roman 
camps 1 ; and recently, in forming the line of the Bristol 
and Exeter railway, the foundation of the wall of an 
ancient village, about a quarter of a mile in extent, 
was discovered, with numerous coins of Constantine 
and Severus, and domestic utensils. 

ASHTON, STEEPLE, cum SEMINGTON (S T . MARY), 
a parish, partly in the union of WESTBURY and WHOR- 
WELSDOWN, and partly in that of MELKSHAM, hundred 
of WHORWELSDOWN, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions 
of WILTS; containing, with the chapelry of Semington 
and the tythings of West Ashton, Hinton, and Littleton, 
1941 inhabitants, of whom 848 are in the village of 
Steeple Ashton, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Trowbridge. 
This place derived the adjunct by which it is distin- 
guished from other localities of the same name, from 
the lofty spire of its church, which was first injured, and 
then struck down by lightning in 1670. It was formerly 
of some importance, and had the grant of a market in 
the reign of Edward III., which was confirmed in that of 
Richard II., with the addition of an annual fair. In the 
91 



time of Henry VIII. Leland states that the clothing 
trade was carried on here to a very considerable extent, 
but it has ceased to exist ; the market also has been for 
many years discontinued, but the fair, though now very 
inconsiderable, is still held on the 18th of Sept. Steeple 
Ashton contains by estimation 5400 acres, of which 
2120 are arable, 2660 pasture, and 540 woodland ; and 
Semington consists of 1195a. Ir. 24/>., of which 213 
acres are arable, and 923 pasture. The living is a 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 17. 2. 6. ; net 
income, 852 ; patron, the Master of Magdalene College, 
Cambridge, who is restricted in his presentation to one 
of three senior foundation fellows. The church is a 
spacious structure, in the later English style, built 
between the years 1480 and 1500, and has a lofty square 
embattled tower at the west end, crowned with pinnacles, 
and a north and south porch of elegant design. There 
is a chapel at Semington, which probably was in early 
times a distinct parish ; it is in the later English style, 
and was built before the Reformation. John Hicks 
bequeathed 5 per annum for teaching children, and 
John Togwell a further sum for the same purpose, which 
have been laid out in the purchase of 519. 10. 7., three 
per cent, consols. ; and a national school was erected in 
1836. The parish is remarkable for fossils of the coral- 
rag formation. 

ASHTON-UNDER-HILL (Sr. BARBARA), a parish, 
in the union of EVESHAM, partly in the Upper division 
of the hundred of TEWKESBURY, but chiefly in the hun- 
dred of TIBALDSTONE, E. division of the county of GLOU- 
CESTER, 8 miles (E. N. E.) from Tewkesbury ; contain- 
ing 342 inhabitants, and comprising about 1300 acres. 
The living is annexed to the vicarace of Beckford, and 
the impropriation belongs to W. Wakeman and J. 
Blackburne, Esqs. : the tithes were commuted for land 
and a money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1773. 

ASHTON-UNDER-LINE (S T . MICHAEL), a parish, 
market-town, parliamentary borough, and the head of a 
union, in the hundred of SALFORD, S. division of the 
county of LANCASTER, 60 miles (S. E.) from Lancaster, 7 
(E.) from Manchester, and 187 (N. W.) from London, on 
the road to Sheffield ; comprising the townships or dis- 
tricts of Ashton town, Audenshaw, Hartshead with Staly- 
bridge, and Knott Lanes ; and containing 46,304 inha- 
bitants, of whom 22,678 are in Ashton town. This place, 
in ancient, records styled Ashtown sub Lima, derives its 
name from the tree so called, and the adjunct by which it 
is distinguished from other places of the same name in 
the county, from its situation below the Lyme of Cheshire. 
Its original proprietors, the Asshetons, a family distin- 
guished in the early periods of English history, exercised 
the power of life and death ; and a field near the old 
hall, called Gallows' Meadow, was the place of execu- 
tion. In the reign of Henry VI. a descendant of that 
family, still inheriting extraordinary privileges, clad in 
black armour and mounted on a charger, with a nume- 
rous retinue, levied a penalty on his tenants, for neg- 
lecting to clear their lands from a pernicious weed, then 
called Car gulds, on the discovery of which among his 
corn every farmer was liable to forfeit a wether sheep. 
In commemoration of this, the ceremony of "riding the 
black lad" still takes place on Easter-Monday, when 
the effigy of a man in black armour is placed on horee- 
back, and led in procession through the town ; it is then 
dismounted and hung up at the cross in the old market- 

N2 



A SHT 



A SHU 



place, and, after having been shot at, is immersed in a 
stagnant pool by the populace, who return through the 
principal streets, throwing it at those they meet. 

The TOWN is situated on an eminence rising from the 
northern bank of the river Tame ; the old streets are 
narrow and irregular, but those recently formed are 
spacious, and contain substantial and handsome houses. 
It is well paved, and lighted with gas, and is rapidly 
improving under the management of local commis- 
sioners : a company has also been formed for supplying 
the town with water. A neat theatre is occasionally 
opened, and a concert-room has been built. The prin- 
cipal branches of manufacture are those of calico, ging- 
ham, and muslin, and there are numerous mills for 
spinning the finer kinds of yarn : the manufacture of 
hats is also carried on extensively in the district. The 
neighbourhood abounds with excellent coal, which is 
conveyed to all parts of the kingdom by the Ashton, 
Huddersfield, and Peak Forest canals, which unite here. 
The market, which, previously to the establishment of 
the cotton trade, had fallen into disuse, was restored by 
act of parliament in 1828, under which act a convenient 
market-place has been erected : it is held on Wednesday 
and Saturday, and fairs take place on March 23rd, April 
29th, and on the eve, day, and morrow of St. Swithin 
and St. Martin, chiefly for horses and cattle. The town 
was formerly incorporated, but is now within the juris- 
diction of the county magistrates, who sit every Monday 
and Wednesday, and hold a petty-session, every alter- 
nate week, for the Middleton division of the hundred. 
Its internal regulation is entrusted to the superintend- 
ence of the local commissioners, who have established a 
police force ; and other constables are appointed at the 
autumnal court leet of the lord of the manor. This court 
is held in April and Oct. for the recovery of debts under 
40*. : at the former period a mayor is appointed and 
sworn into office ; which custom, having been discon- 
tinued about 20 years, was revived on the passing of the 
Reform act, in order to provide a returning officer. The 
inhabitants are empowered to return a member to parlia- 
ment, the right of election being vested exclusively in 
the 10 householders ; the borough is co-extensive with 
one of four divisions of the parish, called the Town divi- 
sion, and contains 1319 acres. A court of requests for 
the recovery of debts under 5 is held on the Thursday 
in every third week. 

The parish comprises about 12,000 acres. The LIVING 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 26. 13. 4. ; 
net income, 140? ; patron, Earl of Stamford and War- 
rington. The parochial church is a spacious structure, 
in the later English style, with a tower built in the reign 
of Henry V., but much altered by subsequent repairs : it 
sustained considerable injury from an accidental fire in 
1821. The living of Mossley chapelry is a perpetual 
curacy in the patronage of the Rector, with a net in- 
come of 127 : the chapel is a plain building erected in 
1755 on land given by Sir Joseph Pickford, and enlarged 
in 1787. The chapel at Hey is dedicated to St. John : 
the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, 131 ; 
patron, Rector of Ashton. St. Peters, a handsome edi- 
fice in the same style, with a square embattled tower 
crowned with pinnacles, was erected in 1821, at the 
expense of 12,688. 13. 6., defrayed by the Parliamen- 
tary Commissioners : the living is a perpetual curacy, 
and has an ecclesiastical district annexed to it ; net in- 
92 



come, 137; patron, Rector of Ashton. A church has 
also been erected at Stall/bridge, in the parish ; and there 
are places of worship for Independents and Primitive 
and Wesleyan Methodists, also a large building for the 
followers of Johanna Southcote. Several schools in the 
parish are aided with charitable funds : one, for which 
a school-house was built by subscription, is endowed 
with 40 per annum. The poor law union of which 
this town is the head, comprises 9 parishes or places in 
the county of Chester, and 4 in the county of Lancaster, 
and contains a population of 101,206. The Roman road 
from Manchester to Saddleworth may still be traced in the 
vicinity : near the old hall are the remains of an ancient 
prison, and in the old market-place those of a cross. 

ASHTON-UPON-MERSEY (ST. MARTIN), a parish, 
in the union of ALTRINCHAM, hundred of BUCKLOW, 
N. division of the county of CHESTER, if mile (N.) from 
Altrincham ; comprising the townships of Ashton and 
Sale, the former containing 1105, and the latter, which 
is locally situated in the parish of Great Budworth, 1309 
inhabitants. A court leet is held by the Earl of Stam- 
ford and Warrington, who is lord of the manor. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 13. 4. 7- ; 
net income, 608 ; patron and incumbent, Rev. C. B. 
Sowerby. There are places of worship for Calvinists, 
Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists, and Unitarians ; 
and in the township of Sale is a school endowed with 
land and tenements producing 25. 15. per annum. 
John Okell, Esq. left 80 ; Thomas Ashtou, Esq. 40 ; 
and Mrs. Safe, 23 ; the proceeds of which are distri- 
buted among the poor. 

ASHTON, WEST, a tything, in the parish of STEE- 
FLE-AsHTON, union of WESTBURY and WHORWELS- 
DOWN, hundred of WHORWELSDOWN, Whorwelsdown 
and N. divisions of WILTS ; containing 307 inhabitants. 
The tithes have been commuted for rent-charges amount- 
ing to 413. 15., of which 410 are payable to the vicar 
of the parish, and 3. 15. to the rector of Trowbridge. 
A school is supported by Mrs. Long. 

ASHURST, a parish, in the union of TONE RIDGE, 
hundred of WASHLINGSTONE, lathe of AYLESFORD, W. 
division of KENT, 4f miles (W.) from Tonbridge Wells ; 
containing 224 inhabitants. It is bounded by the river 
Medway, and intersected by the road from East Grin- 
stead to Tonbridge Wells, and contains about 700 acres. 
The surface is finely undulated, commanding from the 
higher grounds some extensive and interesting views, 
and the soil varies from light sandy to strong clay : 
there are some quarries of soft sandstone for building. 
The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 5. 4. 7., and in the gift of the Countess of 
Amhurst, with a net income of 164 : the glebe consists 
of 28 acres. The church, an ancient building, was, pre- 
viously to the Reformation, in high repute for the sanctity 
of its ancient rood-loft. 

ASHURST, a parish, in the union of STEYNING, 
hundred of WEST GRINSTEAD, rape of BRAMBER, W. 
division of SUSSEX, 3 miles (N.) from Steyning ; contain- 
ing 427 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 
2236a. Ir. 14p., is bounded on the north and east by the 
river Adur, which is navigable to Binesbridge ; and the 
road from Horsham to Brighton, through Steyning, runs 
through it. The living is a rectory not in charge ; net 
income, 268 ; patrons, President and Fellows of Mag- 
dalene College, Oxford. The church is in the early 



A S H VV 



A S H W 



English style, with later additions, and consists of a 
nave, chancel, and south aisle, at the west end of which 
is a low tower surmounted by an obtuse spire. 

ASHWATER (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
HOLSWORTHY, hundred of BLACK TORRINGTON, Hols- 
worthy and N. divisions of DEVON, 7 miles (S. E. by S.) 
from Holsworthy ; containing 1046 inhabitants. This 
parish, which is separated from the adjacent parishes of 
Bradwood-Widger and Virginstow by the river Gary, 
forms a square of nearly four miles ; the soil is very in- 
ferior, the substratum clay, and the land generally hilly. 
Considerable quantities of freestone of excellent quality 
are obtained in tbe neighbourhood. Fairs for cattle are 
held on the first Tuesday in May, and the Monday next 
after the 1st of August. The living is a rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 26. 6. 8. ; net income, 437 .; 
patron and incumbent, Rev. T. Melhuish. The glebe 
comprises 70 acres. The church, which is a handsome 
structure, with a tower sixty feet in height, has been re- 
pewed and beautified, and contains some interesting monu- 
ments to the Carey family, and a curious ancient font. 

ASHWELL (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
ROYSTON, hundred of ODSEY, county of HERTFORD, 4^ 
miles (N. N. E.) from Baldock j containing 1235 inha- 
bitants. This place derives its name from a well or 
spring issuing from a rock at the southern extremity 
of the village, surrounded with ash trees, and forming 
the source of the small river Rhee. At the time of 
the Norman survey it was a borough and market-town, 
having four annual fairs ; it was also a royal demesne, 
and a small manor within the parish was held by Walter 
Somoner, in petit serjeantry, by the service of providing 
spits and roasting meat in the king's kitchen, on the 
day of his coronation. The parish contains about 4200 
acres ; the surface is diversified, and the soil chalky. A 
considerable trade in malt is carried on, the barley pro- 
duced in the neighbourhood being of very superior 
quality. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 22. 3. 6. ; patron and appropriator, Bishop 
of London : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 690. 18. 2., and there is a good glebe-house. 
The church is a spacious structure, with a tower and 
spire 175 feet high. A free school, now conducted on 
the national plan, was founded and endowed under the 
will of Henry Colborn or Colebron, dated in 1655, who 
bequeathed 1000 in trust to the Merchant Tailors' 
Company, by whom the master is appointed ; and there 
are several charities for distributing bread among the 
poor, and apprenticing children. On Harborough hill, 
in the parish, are the remains of a quadrangular en- 
campment, probably an exploratory station of the 
Romans. The Rev. Ralph Cudworth, D.D., Master of 
Christ's College, Cambridge, and author of the " Intel- 
lectual System," was vicar of the parish, and died here 
in 1688. 

ASHWELL (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
OAKHAM, hundred of ALSTOE, county of RUTLAND, 3 
miles (N. by W.) from Oakham ; containing 223 inhabit- 
ants. It comprises 1800 acres by measurement ; the 
soil is fertile, and a coarse kind of stone is quarried for 
inferior buildings, and for the roads. The Melton- 
Mowbray and Oakham canal passes within a mile of the 
parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 20. 16. 3., and in the gift of Viscount Downe : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
93 



412, and the glebe comprises 130 acres. The church 
is a neat substantial structure, in the later English 
style. There are two schools. 

ASHWELTHORPE (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of DEPWADE, E. division of NOR- 
FOLK, 3^ miles (S. E. by S.) from Wymondham ; contain- 
ing 469 inhabitants. The road from New Buckenham 
to Norwich runs through the parish. The living is a 
discharged rectory, with that of Wreningham cum Nay- 
land annexed, valued in the king's books at 6. 13. 4. ; 
net income, 648 ; patron, Lord Berners. The incum- 
bent resides in the hall, an ancient residence of the 
Knyvett family, moated on three sides. The church, 
which is chiefly in the decorated style, consists of a 
nave and chancel, with a chapel on the north side, and 
a square embattled tower ; in the chancel is an altar- 
tomb, on which are the effigies of Sir Edward and Lady 
de Thorpe. A schoolroom was lately erected by the 
Hon. and Rev. Robert Wilson, the rector. 

ASHWICK. (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
SHEPTON-MALLET, hundred of KILMERSDON, E. divi- 
sion of SOMERSET, 3f miles (N. by E.) from Shepton- 
Mallet ; comprising 1527. 2r. 34/>., and containing 945 
inhabitants. There are many quarries, supplying a 
material for building and for making lime. At the vil- 
lage of Oakhill, which stands partly in this parish, and 
partly in those of Stoke Lane and Shepton-Mallet, are 
some good residences, and a public brewery ; and the 
road from Bath to Exeter, and another from Bristol to 
Weyrnouth, run through the parish. The living is a 
perpetual curacy ; net income, 113; patron, Vicar of 
Kilmersdon; impropriator, J. Twyford Jolliffe, Esq. 
The great tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 28. 10., and those of the incumbent for 59. 15. j 
the glebe consists of 2^ acres. The curacy was sepa- 
rated from the vicarage of Kilmersdon in 1826, at which 
time also the church was rebuilt, with the exception of 
the tower ; it is a neat structure, accommodating about 
550 persons. There are places of worship for Inde- 
pendents, Unitarians, and Methodists. On the south- 
western side of the parish, near the Fosseway, is a 
Roman camp, with a double intrenchment, called Mas- 
bury Castle. 

ASHWICKEN (ALL SAINTS), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of FREEBRIDGE-LYNN. W. division of 
NORFOLK, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Lynn-Regis ; contain- 
ing 78 inhabitants. It comprises 1178a. 2r., of which 
638 acres are arable, 378 pasture and meadow, 150 
heath, and 12 woodland ; the surface is a good deal un- 
dulated. The living is a rectory, with that of Leziate 
annexed, valued in the king's books at 6. 13. 4. ; pa- 
tron and incumbent, Rev. John Freeman. The tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 238, and the 
glebe comprises 10 acres. The church is chiefly in the 
later English style, with a square tower. 

ASHWORTH, a chapelry, in the parish of MIDDLE- 
TON, union of BURY, hundred of SALFORD, S. division 
of the county of LANCASTER, 3 miles (W.) from Roch- 
dale ; containing 325 inhabitants. It comprises by 
estimation 1022 acres; the soil is fertile, and the sub- 
stratum abounds with coal, of which a mine is in opera- 
tion. Stone of good quality for building is also pro- 
cured in abundance, and there is a fulling-mill in the 
township. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 
119] patron, W. Egerton, Esq. The rectorial tithes 



A S K E 



A S KH 



have been commuted for a rent-charge of 15, and the 
glebe comprises 62 acres. The chapel, dedicated to St. 
James, was rebuilt on a larger scale in 1789 ; and in 
1837, the chancel, which was part of the original 
building, was taken down, and the east end of the 
church was considerably enlarged. A school is partly 
supported by Mr. Egerton. 

ASKE, a township, in the parish of EASBY, union of 
RICHMOND, wapentake of GILLING-WEST, N. riding of 
the county of YORK, if mile (N.) from Richmond ; 
containing 92 inhabitants. The township comprises 
1610 acres of well-cultivated land; the soil is good and 
productive, and the scenery embraces fine and varied 
prospects of the surrounding country. Aske Hall, one 
of the seats of the Earl of Zetland, is a spacious and 
elegant castellated mansion, situated on rising ground in 
a large and beautiful park, and embosomed in noble 
woods of fine old timber, and pleasure-grounds of varied 
surface, tastefully and thickly planted : many of the 
views enjoyed from the residence are very extensive and 
of striking beauty. The noble earl's inferior title is Baron 
Dundas. of the manor of Aske, conferred in 1794. 

ASKERNE, a township, in the parish of CAMPSALL, 
union of DONCASTER, Upper division of the wapen- 
take of OSGOLDCROSS, W. riding of YORK, 7^ miles (N.) 
from Doncaster ; containing 468 inhabitants. Askerne, 
during the present century, has risen from an incon- 
siderable village, into an elegant and fashionable water- 
ing-place : it is pleasantly situated near the road, on a 
rocky acclivity, rising gently from the foot of an exten- 
sive plain ; and its houses, hotels, and bathing establish- 
ments, surrounded by gardens, orchards, and plantations, 
all agreeably harmonising together, give it an interesting 
and commanding appearance. Here is a sheet of water, 
called Askerne pool, covering seven a.cres, a few yards 
from which rises a sulphureous spring, highly celebrated 
for more than a century as a powerful remedy in scrofu- 
lous, rheumatic, and gouty complaints : it is also reputed 
for its virtue in dyspepsia, palsy, and pulmonary con- 
sumption. Boarding-blouses, and inns of the first de- 
scription, have been erected for the accommodation of 
visiters. The tithes were commuted for land in 1814. 

ASKERSWELL (Sr. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union of BRIDPORT, hundred of EGGERTON, Bridport 
division of DORSET, 4 miles (E.) from Bridport ; con- 
taining 233 inhabitants. It contains about 1200 acres ; 
the soil is chalky, and the surface hilly. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 9. 2. 6. ; net 
income, l60j patron, Rev. James Cox. The glebe 
contains 23 acres, with a house. 

ASKERTON, a township, in the parish of LANER- 
COST, union of BRAMPTON, ESKDALE ward. E. division 
of CUMBERLAND, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Brampton ; 
containing 496 inhabitants. The castle, a small build- 
ing with lofty turrets, situated on a rocky knoll on the 
southern bank of the rivulet Cambeck, and commanding 
a most extensive view of the adjacent country, is partly 
ruinous and used as stables, but much of it has been 
recently modernised in the interior, and the building is 
now inhabited by a farmer. It was in ruins in Camden's 
time, but was repaired by the Dacres in the 16th cen- 
tury, and over a mantel-piece in what was once the 
dining- hall is an inscription, " Tho. Carleton, Jun., 
1575," the date of the repair. Askerton comprises the 
ancient parish of Kirk-Cambeck, the church of which 
94 



was destroyed by the Scots in the reign of Edward II. ; 
and the tithes are held on lease from the Dean and 
Chapter of Carlisle. The inhabitants attend the church 
of Lanercost for the performance of ecclesiastical rites. 

ASKHAM, a parish, in the union of EAST RETFORD, 
within the liberty of SOUTHWELL and SCROOBY, locally 
in the South-Clay division of the wapentake of BASSET- 
LAW, N. division of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 2f 
miles (N.) from Tuxford ; containing, with Rockley 
hamlet, 288 inhabitants. The parish contains about 
1440 acres, of which the surface is undulated, and the 
soil clayey ; the village is skirted on the north by the 
stream called North Beck, which is subject to inunda- 
tions after heavy rains. The living is a perpetual 
curacy, annexed, with that of Stokeham, to the vicarage 
of East Drayton : two acres of land, and the tithes of 
hops, form the principal value of the curacy. There are 
almshouses for six widows. 

ASKHAM (Sr. PETER), a parish, in WEST ward 
and union, county of WESTMORLAND, 4f miles (S.) from 
Penrith ; containing 635 inhabitants. It comprises 4264 
acres, of which 2049 are tithable, 2150 woods and com- 
mons, and 65 tithe-free ; the surface is partly undulated 
and partly hilly, and the soil rests principally on lime- 
stone and peat. The river Lowther bounds the parish 
on the east, and the Dale Beck on the south. The 
living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with a portion 
of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at 
6 ; net income, 156 ; patron, and impropriator of the 
remainder of the great tithes, Earl of Lonsdale. The 
glebe comprises 56 acres. A school was endowed in 
1813, with subscriptions amounting to 420, part of 
which has been vested in the purchase of land. 

ASKHAM-BRYAN, or GREAT (ST. NICHOLAS), a 
parish, in the AINSTY wapentake, W. riding of YORK, 
4 miles (W. S. W.) from York ; containing 342 inhabit- 
ants. This place derives its name partly from Bryan 
I'itz-Alain, who held it of the honour of Richmond, 
paying 5*. per annum to the warden of the castle of 
that town : the families of Mowbray, Stapleton, and 
Grey have also owned the estates. The parish com- 
prises by measurement 1S08 acres, three-fourths of 
which are arable and the rest meadow, with some few 
plantations ; the surface is flat, and the soil composed 
chiefly of gravel and clay. Contiguous to the church 
passes the York and North-Midland railway. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 120 ; patron, 
Colonel Croft, ,of Stillington Park. The tithes were 
commuted for land, by an inclosure act, in 1811. There 
is a place of worship for Wesleyans ; and a school is 
endowed with 6 per annum. Several benefactions for 
the poor amount to about 20 a year. The parish is 
governed by the provisions of Gilbert's act. 

ASKHAM-RICHARD, or LITTLE (ST. MARY), a 
parish, in the AINSTY wapentake, union and "W. riding of 
YORK, 3^ miles (N. E.) from Tadcaster ; containing 232 
inhabitants. In t.he 9th of Edward II. the priory of 
Burlington held this manor ; and the patronage of the 
church was exercised by the nuns of Monkton till the 
dissolution, when the privilege was granted to the Vava- 
sour family. The parish comprises by measurement 
929 acres, of which about three-fourths are arable, and 
the remainder meadow or pasture ; the surface is gene- 
rally level, and the soil of a gravelly and clayey quality. 
The road from Leeds to York, and the York and North- 



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Midland railway cross each other near this place, where 
ateo is Askham Hall, the seat of Robert Swann, Esq. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 4. 13. 4. ; net income, 200 : patron, H. Croft, 
Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1813. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans ; and a school 
is endowed with 4 per annum, left by Lady Hewley. 

ASKRTGG, a market-town and chapelry, in the 
parish of AYSGARTH, wapentake of HANG-WEST, N. 
riding of YORK, 57 miles (W. N. W.) from York, and 
247 (N. W. by N.) from London ; containing 726 inha- 
bitants. The town, is situated on an eminence rising 
from the northern bank of the river Ure, and upon the 
road from Richmond to Lancaster ; the lands are almost 
entirely occupied as pasture, and the surrounding 
country exhibits some fine waterfalls and picturesque 
scenery. It was formerly a place of considerable note, 
but has fallen into decay ; there is a wool-carding mill, 
and in the neighbourhood are lead-mines, but they are 
not very productive. The market is on Thursday ; 
fairs are held on May llth, July llth and 12th, and 
Oct. 28th ; and there is also a fair for general traffic 
and recreation on the first Thursday in June. By the 
act of the 2nd and 3rd of William IV. cap. 64, Askrigg 
was made a polling-place for the North riding. The 
living is a perpetual curacy; net income, 100; patron, 
Vicar of Aysgarth. The impropriate tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 84, payable to Trinity 
College, Cambridge. The chapel is an ancient structure, 
dedicated to St. Oswald. There is a place of worship 
for Wesleyans. The Yorebridge free grammar school, 
in the chapelry, was founded for the sons of inhabitants, 
in 1601, by Anthony Besson, Esq., who endowed it 
with an inn, named the Black Swan, in York, and a 
plot of about two acres and a half of ground, called the 
Intack, producing upwards of 200 per annum, which is 
paid to the master, who has also a house and garden 
rent-free. A national school for boys and girls is sup- 
ported by subscription. Almshouses were founded and 
endowed with 2000 three per cent, consols, in 1807, 
by Christopher Alderson, for six poor widows of the 
townships of Askrigg and Low Abbotside, each of whom 
has a stipend of 10 per annum. 

ASKWITH, or ASQUITH, a township, in the parish 
of WESTON, Upper division of the wapentake of CLARO, 
W. riding of YORK, 3 miles (N. W.) from Otley ; con- 
taining, with Askwith-Moorside and Snowden, 398 in- 
habitants. It comprises by computation 3180 acres, 
and includes the hamlets of Upper and Lower Snow- 
den : the village, which is scattered, is pleasantly situ- 
ated on the northern acclivities of Wharfdale, and the 
river Wharfe winds its devious course on the south and 
West. The tithes were commuted for land, in 1779- 
There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists 
and Wesleyans. 

ASLACKBY (Sr. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
BOURNE, wapentake of AVELAND, parts of KESTEVEN, 
county of LINCOLN, 2^ miles (S. S. E.) from' Folking- 
ham ; containing, with the hamlets of Graby and Mil- 
thorpe, 507 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from 
London to Hull, and comprises by measurement 3420 
acres ; the soil is various, and the surface is pleasingly 
diversified with hill and dale, and richly embellished 
with wood. The river Forty-foot, which is navigable 
from Bourne to Boston, skirts the eastern extremity of 
95 



the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 12. 10. 7|. ; net income, 453 ; patron 
and impropriator, R. F. Barstow, Esq. The tithes are 
compounded for the above sum, and the glebe com- 
prises 39 acres. The church is a handsome edifice in 
the decorated and later English styles, with an embat- 
tled tower crowned with pinnacles. A parochial school 
is supported by subscription. Here was a preceptory 
of Knights Templars, which, on the abolition of their 
order, became a commandery of the Hospitallers. 

ASLACTON (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of DEPWADE, E. division of NORFOLK, 3^ 
miles (W. by S.) from Long Stratton ; containing 404 
inhabitants, and comprising about 1130 acres. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 58 ; patron 
and impropriator, John Cooper, Esq., whose tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 340. The church, 
which is chiefly in the perpendicular style, consists of 
a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with a circular tower. 

ASLACTON, a township, in the parish of WHATTON, 
union of B^NGHAM, N. division of the wapentake of 
BINGHAM, S. division of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 
2| miles (E. by N.) from Bingham ; containing 424 in- 
habitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a 
money payment, in 1780. This is the birth-place of 
Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

ASPALL, a parish, in the union and hundred of 
HARTISMERE, W. division of the county of SUFFOLK, 
] mile (N. by W.) from Debenham ; containing 132 in- 
habitants. The river Deben rises in this parish, which 
comprises 834a. 3r. 26/>. The living is a perpetual 
curacy; net income, 149; patron, impropriator, and 
incumbent, Rev. John Chevallier, M.D., whose residence 
is the ancient moated mansion of Aspall Hall. 

ASPATRIA (Sr. KENTIGERN), a market-town and 
parish, in the union of WIGTON, ALLERDALE ward below 
Derwent, W. division of CUMBERLAND ; comprising the 
townships of Aspatria with Brayton, Hayton with Medlo, 
and Oughterside with Allerby ; and containing 1921 in- 
habitants, of whom 988 are in the township of Aspatria 
with Brayton, 9 miles (N. by E.) from Cockermouth. This 
village, which derives its name from Gospatrick, father 
of the first lord of Allerdale, extends for a considerable 
distance along the side of a hill, and has recently as- 
sumed somewhat the character of a town, by the erec- 
tion of several good and substantial dwelling-houses, 
and has a pitched market for corn, which is held on 
Thursday. The parish, which comprises by measure- 
ment 7064 acres, and is intersected by the Maryport 
and Carlisle railway, is bounded on the west by the 
Solway Frith, and on the south-east and south by the 
river Ellen, and contains a vein of red freestone at 
Hayton, and coal at Oughterside. The living is a vicar- 
age, valued in the king's books at 10. 4. 2.; net in- 
come, 249 ; patron and appropriator, Bishop of Car- 
lisle. The tithes were partially commuted in 1817 for 
land. The church was originally in the Norman style, 
but there are no remains of its ancient character except 
two arches. A place of worship for Independents was 
built in 1827. The parochial school was established in 
1825 by subscription, and in 1837 a new school- room 
was built by Sir Wilfrid Lawson, Bart, of Brayton 
House. In 1790 a barrow was opened in the vicinity, 
when the skeleton of a man, with the corroded remains 
of some military weapons, &c., was discovered. 



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ASPEDEN (-Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BUNTINGFORD, hundred of EDWINSTREE, county of 
HERTFORD, f- of a mile (S.) from Buntingford ; con- 
taining 529 inhabitants. It comprises about 1340 acres, 
of which the soil is clayey ; and the rivulet Rib runs 
through the district, and falls into the Lea near Hert- 
ford. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books 
15. 5. 2|.; net income, 357; patron, Lady Mex- 
borough. The glebe consists of nearly 23 acres. W. and 
R. Freeman, in 1668, and Mrs. Cater, in 1704, gave land 
for the education of children, now producing 17. 5. per 
annum ; and R. Freeman assigned an additional plot 
for clothing them. In 1684, Dr. Seth Ward, Bishop 
of Sarum, founded an almshouse for two men and two 
women, and endowed it with 41. 12. a year. 

ASPLEY, a township, in the parish of ECCLESHALL, 
union of STONE, N. division of the hundred of Pi RE- 
HILL and of the county of STAFFORD ; containing 34 
inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for rent- 
charges amounting to 87. 11. 4., of which 86. 18. 6. 
are payable to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield, and 
12s. lOd. to the vicar of the parish. 

ASPLEY, with FORDHALL, a hamlet, in the parish 
of WOOTTON-WAWEN, union of STRATFORD-ON-AVON, 
Henley division of the hundred of BARLICHWAY, S. divi- 
sion of the county of WARWICK ; containing 126 in- 
habitants. 

ASPLEY-GUISE (ST. BOTOLPH), a parish, in the 
union of WOBURN, hundred of MANSHEAD, county of 
BEDFORD, 2^ miles (N. by W.) from Woburn ; contain- 
ing 1 139 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 
2033 acres, of which 1953 are arable, and the remainder 
woodland, plantations, and heath; the prevailing tim- 
ber is elm, and the plantations chiefly fir. The inhabit- 
ants obtained in 1267 the grant of a market, to be held 
on Friday, and a fair on June 17th ; but both have been 
long discontinued. The living is a rectory, with which the 
vicarage of Husborn-Crawley was consolidated in 1796, 
valued in the king's books at 15. 16. 10. ; net in- 
come for Aspley-Guise, 215, and for Husborn-Crawley, 
46 ; patron, Duke of Bedford. The tithes were com- 
. muted for 85 acres of land, and an annual payment of 
60, in 1760. The church contains several ancient and 
interesting monuments, among which are an altar-tomb 
with the effigy of Sir Edward Sadlier, in chain armour, 
and another with an effigy in brass of one of the family 
of Guise. There is a place of worship for Wesley ans. 

ASPULL, a township, in the parish and union of 
WIGAN, hundred of SALFORD, S. division of the county 
of LANCASTER, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Wigan ; con- 
taining 2772 inhabitants. It abounds with Cannel coal, 
and comprises by computation 1709 acres, of which 
1145 are pasture, 377 arable, and 40 woodland. A 
church has been erected by the Parliamentary Com- 
missioners ; and there is a school with an endowment 
of 11 per annum. The tithes have been commuted for 
a rent-charge of 214. 3. 

ASSELBY, a township, in the parish and union of 
HOWDEN, wapentake of HOWDENSHIRE, E. riding of 
YORK, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Howden ; containing 
293 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book Aschi- 
lebi, was held at the Conquest chiefly by the Bishop of 
Durham and Earl Morton, and the Aislabys had pro- 
perty here, and are supposed to have taken their name 
from that of the township. It comprises by comupta- 
96 



tion 1200 acres ; the land is very rich and prolific, and 
the gardens supply large quantities of fruit for the mar- 
kets in the West riding. Asselby Island, containing 
about 10 acres, is seated in the river Ouse, which flows 
at a short distance on the south of the village ; and 
belongs to the parish of Drax. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans. 

ASSENDON, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred 
of PIRTON, county of OXFORD, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from 
Henley-upon-Thames. Here is an almshouse, endowed 
with 5 per annum. 

ASSERBY, a hamlet, in the parish of BILSBY, union 
of SPILSBY, Wold division of the hundred of CALCE- 
WORTH, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN ; con- 
taining 54 inhabitants. 

ASSINGDON, county of ESSEX. See ASHINGDON. 

ASSINGTON (6'x. EDMUND), a parish, in the union 
of SUDBURY, hundred of BABERGH, W. division of SUF- 
FOLK, 5 miles (E. S. E.) from Sudbury ; containing 778 
inhabitants. Assington Hall was purchased by Robert 
Gurdon, in the reign of Henry VIII. from Sir Piers 
Corbet, and the hall has ever since been the residence of 
that family. A double stratum of cement stone has 
been found in the parish, and is now regularly manu- 
factured. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed 
with part of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's 
books at 10; patron and impropriator of the remain- 
der of the great tithes, John Gurdon, Esq., whose tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 361. 15. 3., 
and the vicarial tithes for 444. 7-10. The glebe com- 
prises about 14 acres. A national school is supported 
by subscription. 

ASTBURY (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
CONGLETON, consisting of the township of Somerford- 
Booths, in the hundred of MACCLESFIELD, and the 
market-town of Congleton, and the townships of Ast- 
bury-Newbold, Buglawton, Davenport, Hulme-Wal- 
field, Moreton with Alcumlow, Odd Rode, Radnor, 
Smallwood, and Somerford, in the hundred of NORTH- 
WICH, county of CHESTER ; and containing 14,355 in- 
habitants, of whom 641 are in the township of Astbury- 
Newbold. This parish, which comprises by computa- 
tion 20,000 acres, contains a bed of limestone, from 
twenty-five to thirty yards in thickness, of which con- 
siderable quantities are procured and burnt ; it is based 
on a species of gritstone, which is considered an excel- 
lent stone for building. A railway extends through the 
parish from Mole Cop to a coal wharf near Congleton j 
and the Macclesfield canal passes at a short distance to 
the east of the village. The living is a rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 68, and in the patronage of the 
Trustees of Lord Crewe ; net income, 1485. The 
church is a spacious and beautiful structure, in the later 
English style ; the interior contains several stalls, a 
rood-loft, and some fine screen-work ; the roofs, which 
are of oak, are richly carved j the east window is highly 
enriched, and there are some fine specimens of stained 
glass. The tower, which stands at the north-west angle 
of the church, and is surmounted by an elegant spire, 
appears to have belonged to a former edifice. In the 
township of Odd Rode, and near the hamlet of Scholar 
Green, is the episcopal chapel of the Holy Trinity, built 
forty years ago by Mr. Dobbs, of Ramsdel Hall, and 
lately purchased by Randle Wilbraham, Esq., of Rode 
Hall. The church of St. John, in Buglawton, was built, 



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in 1839-40, by private subscription and grants from the 
Chester Diocesan Society, and is in the Norman style ; 
and there is also a domestic chapel belonging to Sir 
Charles Shakerly, in Somerford Park. The sum of 50 
per annum, the bequest of John Halfbrd, in 1714, is 
partly distributed among the poor, and partly applied in 
apprenticing children. There are some petrifying springs 
in the parish. 

. ASTBURY, NEWBOLD, a township, in the parish 
of ASTBURY, union of CONGLETON, hundred of NORTH- 
WICH, S. division of the county of CHESTER, 3 miles 
(S. by E.) from Congleton ; containing 641 inhabit- 
ants. 

ASTERBY (Sr. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
HORN CASTLE, N. division of the wapentake of GAR- 
TREK, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 7 miles 
(N.) from Horncastle ; containing 256 inhabitants. 
The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 8. 0. 10.; net income, 210; patron, T. 
Southwell, Esq. A national school, for the parishes of 
Asterby and Goulsby, is endowed with a rent-charge of 
10 per annum. 

ASTHALL (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the union of 
WITNEY, hundred of BAMPTON, county of OXFORD, 3 
miles (E. by S.) from Burford ; containing, with the 
hamlet of Asthall-Leigh, 389 inhabitants. This place 
was formerly the residence of Sir Richard Jones, one of 
the judges of the court of common pleas in the reign of 
Charles I. ; and there are still some remains of the 
ancient manor-house near the church, which are now 
converted into a farm-house. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 7. 9. 4^. ; net 
income, 100 ; patrons and impropriators, Provost and 
Fellows of Eton College. The tithes were commuted for 
a money payment and an allotment of land, in 1812. 
The church contains some interesting monuments, 
among which is a recumbent effigy on a stone coffin, 
under an enriched arched canopy, said to be the tomb 
of Alice Corbett, mistress of Henry I., and mother of 
Reginald, Earl of Cornwall. Sir George Fettiplace be- 
queathed 6 per annum, with a house for a school- 
mistress, for which twelve girls are instructed ; and also 
left 5 per annum for apprenticing boys. In the parish 
is a barrow of considerable height, supposed to be a 
sepulchral monument, and near which the Roman 
Akeman- street passes. 

ASTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish ofWiLLOUGH- 
BY, union of SPILSBY, Wold division of the hundred of 
CALCEWORTH, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN ; 
containing 16 inhabitants. 

ASTLEY, a district chapelry, in the parish and union 
of LEIGH, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of the 
county of LANCASTER, 3 miles (E.) from Leigh ; con- 
taining C 2011 inhabitants. It comprises 2290 acres of 
land, and the Duke of Bridgewater's canal from Man- 
chester to Wigan passes through the village. The in- 
habitants are employed either in hand-loom weaving, or 
in the cotton-spinning or power-loom weaving. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 126 ; patron, 
Vicar of Leigh. The church, dedicated to St. Stephen, 
was founded by Adam Mort, in the early part of the 
seventeenth century, and endowed by him with property 
of the value of 18 per annum. In 1760, the old edifice 
was taken down, and a new one erected upon a more 
enlarged plan, by the landowners of the chapelry, the 
VOL. I. 97 



income at that time having been considerably augmented. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A grammar 
school is endowed with 25. 14. 8. per annum ; and, in 
1630, Adam Mort bequeathed land, now producing about 
35 per annum, for the instruction of children here, and 
in the townships of Great Bolton, Little Hulton, Bed- 
ford, and Tyldesley ; the school-house is situated in the 
churchyard. There are also national schools for both 
sexes. 

ASTLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of ST. MARY, 
union of ATCHAM, liberties of SHREWSBURY, N. division 
of SALOP, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Shrewsbury ; contain- 
ing 264 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, 
with a net income of 56, in the patronage of five Trus- 
tees, by order of the court of chancery : the impro- 
priation is vested in the Trustees of Shrewsbury free 
grammar school, whose tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 211. Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, in 1733, 
agreeably to the request of her deceased husband, be- 
queathed a farm here, let for 60 per annum, of which 
about 40 are appropriated for the benefit of the poor of 
Atcham, 10 to the poor of Astley, and 6 to the 
minister : it is also charged with the payment of 5 to 
the organist of St. Mary's. A school connected with 
the charity was established in 1828. 

ASTLEY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
NUNEATON, Kirby division of the hundred of KNIGHT- 
LOW, N. division of the county of WARWICK, 4^ miles 
(W. S. W.) from Nuneaton ; comprising 2555 acres, and 
containing 371 inhabitants. A short distance to the 
north of the church is a mansion, erected in the six- 
teenth century, on the site of a more ancient baronial 
castle : in the interior are a chair and table, which, 
according to an inscription, were those\used by Henry, 
Marquess Grey and Duke of Suffolk, father of Lady 
Jane Grey, when concealed in a hollow tree in the vici- 
nity. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 
60 ; patron and impropriator, C. N. Newdegate, Esq. 
The church was made collegiate, and rebuilt in the form 
of a cross, with a lofty spire, in the reign of Edward 
III., by Lord Thomas de Astley, many of whose family 
were interred here ; the ancient choir, now forming the 
body of the church, is the only portion of the building 
remaining. The revenue of the college, at its dissolution, 
was 46. S. A school is supported by-Mr. Newdegate. 

ASTLEY (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
MARTLEY, Lower division of the hundred of DODDING- 
TREE, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of 
WORCESTER, 3 miles (S. W. by S.) from Stourport ; 
containing 834 inhabitants. This parish, which is 
bounded on the east by the river Severn, comprises by 
measurement 2900 acres ; the soil is highly productive. 
From the quarries in Astley wood has been raised stone 
for the repair of Worcester cathedral, and for the resto- 
ration of the parochial church. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 15. 13. 4.; patrons, 
Trustees of the late Rev. D. J. J. Cooks. The tithes have 
been commuted for a rent- charge of 750, and the glebe 
comprises 20 acres of land of a very mixed quality. The 
church, pleasantly situated on a hill, is an ancient build- 
ing chiefly of Norman architecture, and contains some 
altar-tombs with recumbent effigies of members of the 
family of Blount. Here is a free school, endowed with 
about 20 per annum, by Mrs. Mercy Pope, in 1717- 
An alien priory of Benedictine monks, founded here by 

O 



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A S T O 



Ralph de Todeni, in the reign of William I., was annexed 
to the college of Westbury in that of Edward IV. At 
Redstone ferry is an old hermitage, excavated in a lofty 
cliff by the side of the river. 

ASTLEY, ABBOTS, a parish, in the union of 
BRIDGENORTH, hundred of STOTTESDEN, S. division of 
SALOP, 2 miles (N.) from Bridgeuorth ; containing 657 
inhabitants. This parish, which comprises about 3200 
acres, is intersected by the road from Bridgenorth to 
Broseley, and by the river Severn. The living is a per- 
petual curacy, in the patronage of T. Whitmore, Esq. : 
the tithes have been commuted for rent-charges amount- 
ing to 255. 15., and there are 5l| acres of rectorial 
glebe. The church, which is in the later English style, 
was rebuilt in 1638 ; the chancel is of modern date. A 
parochial school was endowed by Mrs. C. Phillips in 
1805, with 300 in the three per cent, consols. 

ASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of IVINGHOE, union 
of LEIGHTON-BUZZARD, hundred of COTTESLOE, county 
of BUCKINGHAM, if mile (N. N. E.) from Ivinghoe ; 
containing 446 inhabitants. 

ASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of HOPE, union of 
CHAPEL-EN- LE-FRITH, hundred of HIGH PEAK, N. divi- 
sion of the county of DERBY, 63 miles (N: N. E.) from 
Tideswell ; containing 111 inhabitants. 

ASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of AVENING, union 
of STROUD, hundred of LONGTREE, E. division of the 
county of GLOUCESTER ; containing 221 inhabitants. 

ASTON, or PIPE- ASTON (ST. GILES), a parish, in 
the union of LUDLOW, hundred of WIGMORE, county of 
HEREFORD, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Ludlow ; con- 
taining 52 inhabitants. The surface of the parish, con- 
sisting of 733 acres, is undulated and well-wooded ; but 
the soil is of an inferior quality. It is intersected by 
the road from Ludlow to Wigmore and Presteign. The 
living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 2. 13.4.; net income, 84; patrons, the 
Representatives of T. A. Knight, Esq. 

ASTON (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the hundred of 
BROADWATER, union and county of HERTFORD, 3$ 
miles (S. E.) from Stevenage ; containing 556 inhabit- 
ants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 26. 11. 8.; patron and incumbent, Rev. 
James Ellice. The tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 460, and the glebe consists of 42^ acres. 

ASTON, with COTE, a hamlet, in the parish and 
hundred of BAMPTON, union of WITNEY, county of 
OXFORD, 4 miles (S. S. W.) from Witney ; containing 
729 inhabitants. A handsome chapel was built in 1839, 
chiefly by the three portionists of Bampton, who per- ' 
form divine service gratuitously. The tithes have been 
commuted for rent-charges amounting to 556, of 
which 550 are payable to the vicars of Bampton, and 
6 to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter. A national 
school is endowed with land which produces 6 per 
annum ; and another school, commenced in 1826, is 
aided by subscription. 

ASTON, a township, in the parish and union of 
WEM, Whitchurch division of the hundred of NORTH 
BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP ; containing 212 
inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesley- 
ans. 

ASTON, a township, in the parish and union of 
WELLINGTON, hundred of SOUTH BRADFORD, N. divi- 
sion of SALOP ; containing 84 inhabitants. 
98 



ASTON, with BURSTON and STOKE, a township, in 
the parish and union of STONE, S. division of the hun- 
dred of PIREHILL, N. division of the county of STAF- 
FORD; containing 773 inhabitants. 

ASTON, a township, in the parish of MUCKLESTON, 
union of MARKET-DRAYTON, N. division of the hundred 
of PIREHILL and of the county of STAFFORD, 8 miles 
(W. S. W.) from Newcastle-under-Line ; containing 283 
inhabitants. There is a Roman Catholic chapel at Aston 
Hall. 

ASTON (ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a parish, and 
the head of a union, in the Birmingham division of the 
hundred of HEMLINGFORD, N. division of the county of 
WARWICK, adjoining the town of Birmingham (part of 
which is within its limits), and comprising the manor of 
Aston, and the hamlets of Castle and Little Brormvich, 
Erdington, Saltley with Washwood, Water Orton, Wit- 
ton, Deritend with Bordesley, and Duddeston with Ne- 
chells; the whole containing 45,7 18 inhabitants, of whom 
2896 are in the manor of Aston. This extensive parish 
includes several manors anciently belonging to the Earls 
of Mercia, under whom that of Aston was, at the time 
of the Conquest, held by Godmund the Saxon. It, was 
afterwards granted by William the Norman, with other 
large possessions, to one of his followers, William Fitz 
Ausculf, to whom succeeded Gervase Paganell, whose 
nephew, Ralph Somery, gave it to Thomas de Erdington 
about the beginning of the reign of John. In the early 
part of the reign of Edward I. it came into the hands of 
Thomas de Maidenhach, who, in the 13th of that reign, 
claimed by prescription the assize of beer, a gallows, 
infangthef, utfangthef, with a court leet and weifs, also 
that he and his tenants should be free from any suit to 
the county or hundred courts, all which were allowed ; 
and in the following year he obtained a charter of free 
warren in all his demesne lands here. It was purchased, 
in 1367, by the family of Holt, whose descendant, Sir 
Thomas, in 1620, erected the venerable and stately hall, 
in which he entertained Charles I. for two nights previ- 
ously to the battle of Edge-Hill ; the estate was alienated 
by Sir Lister Holt, in 1770, and in 1782 became the 
property of Heneage Legge, Esq. The hall is a spacious 
structure, in the Elizabethan style, and is situated in a 
fine park, richly ornamented with timber of ancient 
growth, and with thriving groves of modern plantation. 
Aston parish, which comprises 12,534a. 2p., is divided 
into nine townships, in all of which are populous villages. 
There are extensive iron-works, of which Aston furnace, 
from the vast accumulation of scoria, appears to have 
been in operation from the remotest period of anti- 
quity ; and Aston forge, to which are attached some 
powerful rolling-mills, is conducted on a large scale. 
The Birmingham and Gloucester, and Grand Junction 
railways pass through the parish : on the banks of the 
Birmingham and Fazeley canal are numerous works 
connected with the Birmingham manufactures, and 
spacious and commodious wharfs have been con- 
structed. 

The LIVING is a vicarage, valued in the king's books 
at 21. 4. 9|. ; net income, 2075 ; patrons, Executors 
of the late Rev. George Peake ; impropriators, Heirs 
of Sir L. Holt. The church is an ancient structure, 
partly in the early, and partly in the later style of 
English architecture, with a handsome tower and finely- 
tapered spire, which, rising above the well-wooded park, 



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forms a beautifully picturesque feature in the scenery, 
and from several points of view is seen in pleasing com- 
bination with the lofty gables of the ancient hall. The 
interior, which has been greatly modernised, contains 
some beautiful specimens of painted glass by Eginton, 
and several ancient and interesting monuments, and 
altar-tombs, with recumbent effigies. There are chapels 
of ease at Castle Bromwich, Water Orton, Ward-End 
in Little Bromwich, Bordesley, Deritend, Erdington, 
and Duddeston, where there are two. The chapel at 
Ward-End, which had fallen into disuse since the 
Reformation, has been restored by subscription ; and 
St. Matthew's, in Duddeston, recently built, is the 
first of ten new churches to be erected in the borough 
of Birmingham. A school is endowed with a house and 
land, valued at about 25 per annum ; and there are 
also a school of industry, and several national, Lancas- 
terian, and other schools. Almshouses for five men and 
five women were founded in 1656, by Sir Thomas Holt, 
Bart., and endowed with a rent-charge of 84 on his 
manor at Erdington. The poor law union of Aston 
comprises five parishes and places, and contains a popu- 
lation of 50, 9*28. 

ASTON (ALL SAINTS}, a parish, in the union of 
ROTHERHAM, S. division of the wapentake of STRAF- 
FORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, 8^ miles 
(E. by S.) from Sheffield ; containing, with the hamlet of 
Aughton and part of Ulley, 763 inhabitants. This 
place, called also Aston cum Aughton, is noticed in 
Domesday book, in which a church is mentioned as 
existing here ; and the history of the spot is of con- 
siderable interest. In the 14th century the estate be- 
came the property of William Melton, Archbishop of 
York, a munificent prelate, and of great piety ; and in 
the time of Henry VIII. , the noble family of D'Arcy 
obtained possession of it by marriage, and held it until 
177 1, when the last Earl of Holderness, whose predeces- 
sors had lived much at Aston, and greatly improved the 
mansion, parted with the lands to Mr. Verilst, a gentle- 
man who had held a high appointment in India, and 
whose family are still resident here. The parish, which 
is bounded on the western side by the river Rother, is 
on the road from Worksop to Sheffield, and is inter- 
sected by that from Rotherham to Mansfield ; it com- 
prises about 3000 acres, chiefly arable land, with not 
more than about 30 acres of wood. The surface is bold 
and elevated, and the views extend over the hills of 
North Derbyshire and the Yorkshire moors ; the soil is 
mostly light, and very fertile, and rests on a stratum 
of coarse dark sandstone, beneath which coal of good 
quality is found, and two mines are in active operation. 
The North-Midland railway passes on the west for a 
distance of two miles. 

The LIVING is a rectory, valued in the king's books 
at 12. 15. 2|., and in the patronage of the Duke of 
Leeds : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 740, and there are about 34 acres of glebe. 
The church is a neat ancient stone building, with a 
tower at the west end ; the chancel, which has recently 
been renovated by the present incumbent, the Rev. 
W. Alderson, contains kneeling marble effigies of the 
"good Lord D'Arcy," who died in 1628, and three 
of his wives, a fourth having survived him ; the east 
window is of stained glass, and occupied chiefly with the 
arms and impalements of the D'Arcy family. In the 
99 



hamlet of Aughton are places of worship for Calvinists 
and Wesleyans. A school is endowed with 15. 2. 6. 
per annum, together with a house and garden ; and a 
Sunday national school is supported by the rector. 
The parish is remarkable for having been for many 
years the residence of the Rev. William Mason, the 
poet, its then rector, who here composed some of his 
most beautiful works, and who reduced to practice his 
rules for English gardening, in the garden which per- 
tained to the rectorial manse : he died in 1797, and 
was buried in the church, where is a tablet to his 
memory. 

'ASTON, ABBOT'S (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the 
union of AYLESBURY, hundred of COTTESLOE, county 
of BUCKINGHAM, 5^ miles (N. N. E.) from Aylesbury ; 
containing 356 inhabitants. The parish comprises by 
measurement 2131 acres ; the village is beautifully 
situated on a hill overlooking the vale of Aylesbury, 
within half a mile of the road from Oxford to Cam- 
bridge. A large supply of excellent butter is sent to 
the London market. The women and children are em- 
ployed in the manufacture of lace and straw-platting. 
The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
6. 7- 1 1. ;' net income, 143 ; patron, Earl of Chester- 
field. About 90 acres of land in the parish, with the 
tithes of the hamlet of Burston, belong to the benefice. 
A school is supported by subscription. 

ASTON-BLANK (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the 
union of NORTHLEACH, hundred of BRADLEY, E. divi- 
sion of the county of GLOUCESTER, 4^ miles (N. by E.) 
from Northleach ; containing 302 inhabitants. This 
parish, which comprises 2200 acres, is situated about 
half a mile from the Stow road, and is bounded on the 
north and north-east by the river Windrush. The 
neighbourhood has been much improved by the inclo- 
sure of waste lands, and plantations made by the lord 
of the manor, who holds courts leet and baron occa- 
sionally. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in 
the king's >books at 6. 12. 4. ; net income, 151 ; 
patron, the Crown. The tithes were commuted for 
land and annual money payments, in 1795 ; the glebe 
consists of 3 acres. Goddard Carter, Esq., late lord of 
the manor, endowed a day school, with 5 per annum, 
for children under ten years of age. 

ASTON-BOTTERELL (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in 
the union of CLEOBURY-MORTIMER, hundred of STOT- 
TESDEN, S. division of SALOP, 9 miles (S. W. by W.) 
from Bridgenorth ; containing, with the chapelry of 
Bold, 173 inhabitants. This place derives the adjunct 
to its name from the family of Botterell, by whom the 
manor was held under the earls of Arundel in the 
reign of Henry III. It is situated on the road from 
Brklgenorth to Ludlow, and comprises 2238a. 22p. : 
limestone is obtained for manure, and basaltic stone for 
the repair of the roads. By a charter of Henry III. a 
market was held on Tuesday, and a fair at Michaelmas ; 
but both have been long discontinued. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 7. 1.0^., and in 
the gift of the Duke of Cleveland : the tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 345, and there are 70 
acres of glebe. In the church is an altar-tomb, on 
which are recumbent figures, supposed to be of the 
Botterell family. 

ASTON-BY-BUDWORTH, a chapelry, in the parish 
of GREAT BUDWORTH, union of ALTRINCHAM, hundred 

02 



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of BUCKLOW, N. division of the county of CHESTER, 3 
miles (N. N. E.) from Northwich; containing 405 inhabit- 
ants. The village is situated at the distance of about 
a mile from the main road between London and Liver- 
pool, and the same distance from the Trent and Mersey 
canal. In the centre of the township are the remains 
of an ancient moated mansion, with an old bridge. A 
petrifying spring rises on the Gore farm, in the 
chapelry. 

ASTON-BY-SUTTON, a chapelry, in the parish and 
union of RUNCORN, hundred of BUCKLOW, N. division 
of the county of CHESTER, 3 miles (E. by N.) from 
Frodsham ; containing 206 inhabitants. It comprises 
2974a. 30p., of which about 535 acres are arable, 1950 
meadow and pasture, 410 woodland, and the remainder 
homesteads and gardens. The small river Weaver.which 
is here navigable, flows through the hamlet of Sutton 
into the river Mersey ; and the Grand Junction railway 
passes through the township of Aston. The living is a 
perpetual curacy j net income, 88 ; patron, A. I. 
Aston, Esq. The glebe comprises 30 acres, with a 
house. The chapel was rebuilt, on an enlarged scale, in 



ASTON- CANTLOW (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a 
parish, in the union of ALCESTER, Stratford division of 
the hundred of BARLICHWAY, S. division of the county 
of WARWICK, 4 miles (N..E. by E.) from Alcester ; con- 
taining 1089 inhabitants. This place appears to have 
derived the adjunct to its name from the family of 
Cantelu, or Cantelupe, of whom William de Cantelupe 
received from Henry III. a confirmation of the lordship, 
together with a market and fair held here. John de 
Hastings, into whose possession it had come, claimed by 
prescription, in the 13th of Edward I., a court leet, with 
assize of bread and beer, weifs, gallows, and free warren, 
all which were allowed. The parish comprises 4758 
acres, and is intersected by the river Alne, on the left 
bank of which the village is situated. The Stratford 
canal passes through it. The living is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 9- 9. 7- ; net 
income, 93 ; patron and incumbent, Rev. R. S. Carles j 
impropriator, Earl of Abergavenny. 

ASTON-CHETWYND, a township, in the parish of 
EDGMOND, union of NEWPORT, Newport division of the 
hundred of SOUTH BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP, 1^ 
mile (S. S. E.) from Newport; containing 385 in- 
habitants. 

ASTON, CHURCH, a chapelry, in the parish of 
EDGMOND, union of NEWPORT, Newport division of the 
hundred of SOUTH BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP, 1 
mile (S.) from Newport; containing 512 inhabitants. 
The chapel is dedicated to St. Andrew. 

ASTON-CLINTON (Sr. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union and hundred of AYLESBURY, county of BUCK- 
INGHAM, 2|- miles (W. by N.) from Tring, on the Lon- 
don road ; containing, with the hamlet of St. Leonard, 
1025 inhabitants, of whom 847 are in the township of 
Aston-Clinton. The Grand Junction canal passes 
through the parish. The cottagers manufacture straw- 
plat and lace. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 23. 6. 10^.; net income, 506; 
patrons, Principal and Fellows of Jesus' College, Ox- 
ford. The tithes, with the exception of those for wood- 
land, were commuted for land and a money payment, in 
1814. There is a place of worship for Baptists. 
100 



ASTON, EAST, a tything, in the parish of LONG- 
PARISH, union of ANDOVER, hundred of WHERWELL, 
Andover and N. divisions of HANTS ; containing 109 
inhabitants. 

ASTON-EYRE, a chapelry, in the parish of MOR- 
VILL union of BRIDGENORTH, hundred of STOTTESDEN, 
S. division of SALOP, 4^ miles (W. by N.) from Bridge- 
north ; containing 130 inhabitants. The living is a 
perpetual curacy, annexed to that of Morvill : the tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 218. 

ASTON-FLAMVILLE (ST. PETER), a parish, in the 
union of HINCKLEY, hundred of SPARKENHOE, S. divi- 
sion of the county of LEICESTER, 2 miles (E. S. E.) 
from Hinckley ; containing, with the chapelry of Bur- 
bage and hamlet of Sketchley, 1909 inhabitants. It 
comprises 4097 acres, of which 3057 are in the chapelry 
of Burbage ; the proportion of arable is computed to 
be 1450 acres, of woodland 149 acres, and the rest is 
pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 33. 12. 8^. ; net income, 878; patron, 
Earl de Grey. The tithes of Burbage have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 677 j the tithe at Aston is 
about 31. 18., and is a modus. The glebe consists of 
about 120 acres. The church of Aston is very ancient : 
that at Burbage, supposed to have been erected in the 
eleventh century, has just been rebuilt. 

ASTON-GRANGE, a township, in the parish and 
union of RUNCORN, hundred of BUCKLOW, N. division 
of the county of CHESTER, 3f miles (E.) from Frod- 
sham ; containing 27 inhabitants. Here is a chapel, 
which was rebuilt on an enlarged plan, in 1737. The 
Grand Junction railway passes a little to the east. 

ASTON-INGHAM, a parish, in the union of NEWENT, 
hundred of GREYTREE, county of HEREFORD, 3 miles 
(S. W. by W.) from Newent ; containing 621 inhabit- 
ants. This parish, which comprises by measurement 
2378 acres, is bounded on the east and south by a 
portion of the county of Gloucester, and is intersected 
by the road from Newent to Mitchel Dean. The sur- 
face exhibits considerable undulations, and numerous 
patches of woodland; and the soil generally is of aver- 
age productiveness. There are some quarries of lime- 
stone, and also of stone for building. The living is a 
rectory, valued in the king's books at 7. 7- 1 ; patron, 
the Rev. Henry Lawson Whatley, the present incum- 
bent. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 350, and there are about 100 acres of glebe, 
and a good house. A school is endowed with about 
10 per annum. 

ASTON-JUXTA-MONDRUM, a township, in the 
parish of ACTON, union and hundred of NANTWICH, S. 
division of the county of CHESTER, 4 miles (N.) from 
Nantwich ; containing 164 inhabitants. The Chester 
and Crewe railway passes close to this place after being 
conducted over the Weaver by a bridge of 8 arches, 60 
feet above the level of the river. The impropriate tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 71. 5., and 
the vicarial for one of 26. 7. 7- 

ASTON-LE- WALLS (ST. LEONARD), a parish, in 
the union of BANBURY, hundred of CHIPPING-WARDEN, 
S. division of the county of NORTHAMPTON, 8| miles 
(N. N. E.) from Banbury ; containing, with the hamlet 
of Appletree, 252 inhabitants. This parish, which is 
intersected in its north-eastern extremity by the road 
from Banbury to Daventry, comprises 1528 acres of a 




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highly productive soil ; the substratum is rock ; and 
stone is quarried for repairing the roads and for rough 
building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 9- 9- 7- > n( ?t income, 343 ; patrons, Presi- 
dent and Fellows of St. John's College, Oxford. The 
glebe comprises 140 acres. The church is an ancient 
structure, in the early English style, with a low Norman 
tower. There is a Roman Catholic chapel; and in con- 
nexion with the church is a school supported by the 
rector. 

ASTON, MAGNA, a hamlet, in the parish of BLOCK- 
LEY, union of SHIPSTON-ON-STOUR, Upper division of 
the hundred of OSWALDSLOW, Blockley and E. divisions 
of the county of WORCESTER, 2|- miles (N.) from 
Moreton-in-the-Marsh ; containing 223 inhabitants. The 
vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
95. 

ASTON, MIDDLE, a township, in the parish of 
STEEPLE-ASTON, union of WOODSTOCK, hundred of 
WOOTTON, county of OXFORD, 3 miles (S. by E.) from 
Deddington ; containing 111 inhabitants, and comprising 
842a. 3r. 20/>. 

ASTON-MORRIS, a tything, partly in the parish of 
BURNHAM, union of AXBRIDGE, hundred of BEMPSTONE, 
E. division, and partly in the parish of HUNTSPILL, 
union of BRIDGWATER, hundred of HUNTSPILL and Pu- 
RITON, W. division of SOMERSET ; containing 239 inha- 
bitants. 

ASTON, NORTH (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of WOODSTOCK, hundred of WOOTTON, county of OX- 
FORD, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Deddington, and 8 (N. N. 
E.) from Woodstock; comprising by measurement 1260 
acres, and containing 289 inhabitants. The Oxford canal 
forms a boundary of the parish on the east. The views 
from the grounds of the mansion are very extensive, and 
of the most pleasing description. On the village green, 
which is one of the prettiest in the county, are some 
very fine elms, and other full-grown trees. The living 
is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 
6. 10. ; net income, 133 ; patron and impropriator, 
Charles Oldfield Bowles, Esq. The church consists of a 
nave, aisles, and chancel, of unequal height, with a tower 
picturesquely covered with ivy; in a chantry on the 
south side of the chancel is an elegant tomb, with recum- 
bent effigies of a male and female, supposed to be those 
of Sir John Anne and Alicia his wife. 

ASTON PIGOT, a township, in the parish of WOR- 
THEN, hundred of CHIRBURY, S. division of SALOP, 
11 miles (N. E.) from Montgomery; containing 78 in- 
habitants. 

ASTON ROGERS, a township, in the parish of 
WORTHEN, hundred of CHIRBURY, S. division of SALOP, 
2^ miles (N. E.) from Worthen ; containing 174 inha- 
bitants. The village is situated on the road between 
Shrewsbury and Montgomery. 

ASTON-ROWANT (Sx. PETER AND ST. PAUL), a 
parish, in the union of THAME, hundred of LEWKNOR, 
county of OXFORD, 3| miles (S. E.) from Tetsworth ; 
containing, with the townships of Chalford and King- 
ston-Blount, 885 inhabitants. The parish comprises 
2800 acres by computation ; the surface is in general 
flat, and the soil composed of chalk, sand, and deep 
clay. Many of the females are employed in lace-making. 
The living is a vicarage, partly endowed with the great 
tithes, with Stokenchurch annexed, and valued in the 
101 



king's books at 16. 18. 11.; net income, 176 ; patron, 
the Crown. The remainder of the great tithes have been 
commuted for land under an act of inclosure. The church 
is partly in the early, and partly in the later style of 
English architecture, and contains some ancient brasses. 
There is a place of worship for Independents at Kingston. 
Near the close of the seventeenth century, a large Roman 
vessel, containing five smaller ones, was discovered in 
Kingston field, within the parish, at the distance of about 
a furlong from the Ikeneld-street. 

ASTON-SANDFORD (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in 
the union of AYLESBURY, hundred of ASHENDON, county 
of BUCKINGHAM, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Thame ; con- 
taining 86 inhabitants. It comprises 669a. 2r. I4p., of 
which 473 acres are tithable. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 12. 16. 0^., and in the 
patronage of Mrs. Susannah Barber : the tithes have 
been commuted for a rent-charge of 107, and the glebe 
consists of 53^ acres. The church is in the later Eng- 
lish style, and has a wooden tower, with three bells. 
The remains of the Rev. Thomas Scott, a learned and 
pious commentator on the Scriptures, and for some time 
rector, were interred in the chancel. 

ASTON, SOMERVILLE (ST. MARY), a parish, in 
the union of EVESHAM, Lower division of the hundred of 
KIFTSGATE, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 
3^ miles (S. S. E.) from Evesham ; containing 89 inha- 
bitants. It is situated on the river Isperne, and com- 
prises by measurement 1000 acres, of which three-fourths 
are arable, and the rest pasture laud ; the soil is a deep 
strong clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 9. 3. 4., and in the patronage of Lord Somer- 
ville : the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 230, and there are about 40 acres of glebe. The 
church, a plain edifice, contains a monument to the late 
Lord Somerville, author of some tracts and essays on 
Agriculture, and Rural Economy, and who was a native 
of this place, and was interred here in 1819. 

ASTON, STEEPLE (ST. PETER), a parish, in the 
union of WOODSTOCK, hundred of WOOTTON, county of 
OXFORD, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Woodstock ; contain- 
ing 580 inhabitants. This place is thought to have been 
occupied by the Romans, as some vestiges of a fosse are 
visible, and a tessellated pavement was discovered in the 
vicinity, in the sixteenth century. The parish, which 
includes the villages of Steeple-Aston and Middle- Aston, 
and comprises 18*5a. 2r. 37p., is intersected by the river 
Cherwell, and skirted by the Oxford canal. The living 
is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 16. 2. S|. ; net 
income, 584 ; patrons, Principal and Fellows of Brase- 
nose College, Oxford. The church is an ancient edifice, 
containing, in a chapel on the north side of the chancel, 
recumbent effigies of Judge Page and his lady, to whom 
the manor formerly belonged. A school is endowed 
with 20 per annum, and a house and garden, from a 
bequest, in 1640, by Dr. Samuel Radcliffe, principal of 
Brasenose College, who founded two scholarships in that 
college, to be supplied, if possible, from this school : the 
same benevolent individual also founded here an alms- 
house for poor women, and was buried in the chancel of 
the church. Near the village a strong chalybeate spring 
was discovered in 1833. 

ASTON-SUB-EDGE (Sr. ANDREW), a parish, in the 
union of EVESHAM, Upper division of the hundred of 
KIFTSGATE, E. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 



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l^ mile (N. N. W.) from Cbipping-Campden j containing 
134 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the 
road to Chipping-Campden and Shipston, comprises by 
measurement 850 acres. Norton-Burnt House, so called 
from the greater portion of it having been destroyed by 
fire while the seat of Sir William Knight, Bart., is the 
property of the Earl of Harrowby, who, with Lord, and 
Lady Sandon, occasionally resides here. The living is 
a rectory, valued in the king's books at 10. 2. 3f . ; net 
income, 204 ; patron, Earl of Harrowby. An allot- 
ment of 100 acres of glebe has been given in lieu of 
tithes. The church is a plain, neat edifice, erected in 
1795, on the site of the old structure. A school is sup- 
ported by Lady Frances Sandon. 

ASTON-TIRROLD (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union of WALLINGFORD, hundred of MORETON, county 
of BERKS, 3| miles (S. W. by W.) from Wallingford ; 
containing 343 inhabitants. Bishop Gibson supposed 
this to be the place called in the Saxon Chronicle 
Aescesdune, where Ethelred I. and his brother Alfred 
defeated the Danes, in 871 ; but Gough, with greater 
probability, considers the battle to have been fought at 
Ashdown Park, near East Ilsley. The parish comprises , 
1650 acres by survey, and is situated near the Great 
Western railway. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 10. 12. 11., and in the patronage of 
the President and Fellows of Magdelene College, Oxford : 
the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
278, and the glebe consists of 36 acres. 

ASTON-UPON-CARRON, a tything, in the parish 
of ASHCHURCH, union of TEWKESBURY, Lower division 
of the hundred of TEWKESBURY, E. division of the 
county of GLOUCESTER, 4^ miles (E. N. E.) from Tewkes- 
bury ; containing 179 inhabitants. 

ASTON -UPON -TRENT (ALL SAINTS), a parish, 
in the union of SHARDLOW, hundred of MORLESTON and 
LITCHURCH, S. division of the county of DERBY, 65 
miles (S. E.) from Derby ; comprising the townships of 
Aston, Shardlow, and Great Wilne, and containing 1952 
inhabitants, of whom 646 are in Aston township. A 
grant of a market and fair was obtained in 1256, but 
both have long been discontinued. The Grand Trunk 
navigation joins the river Trent below Shardlow, in the 
parish, at which place there are extensive wharfs. The 
living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 29. 15. j 
net income, 1030; patron, E. A. Holden, Esq. The 
tithes were commuted for land in 1762. A chapel of 
ease has recently been erected at Shardlow. 

ASTON- UPTHORP, a chapelry, in the parish of 
BLEWBERRY, union of WALLINGFORD, hundred of 
MORETON, county of BERKS, 3^ miles (W. S. W.) from 
Wallingford ; containing 159 inhabitants. It forms a 
part of the parliamentary borough of Wallingford, and 
comprises 1270a. lr. 2p. The chapel is said to be one 
of the most ancient in England. A school for girls is 
supported by subscription. 

ASTON, WEST, a tything, in the parish of LONG- 
PARISH, union of ANDOVER, hundred of WHERWELL, 
Andover and N. divisions of HANTS; containing 170 in- 
habitants. 

ASTON, WHITE LADIES (ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST), 
a parish, in the union of PERSHORE, Lower division of 
the hundred of OSWALDSLOW, Worcester and W. divi- 
sions of the county of WORCESTER, 5 miles (E. S. E.) 
from Worcester ; containing 367 inhabitants. The an- 
102 



dent manor-house of this place, which was pulled down 
a few years since, was the abode of Oliver Cromwell the 
night before the celebrated battle of Worcester. The 
parish, which comprises 1224a. 2r. 24/>., is situated near 
the Spetchley station on the Gloucester and Birmingham 
railway, and on the roads from Worcester to Alcester 
and Evesham. The living is a vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 6. 17- 3^., and endowed with the great 
tithes ; patron, R. Berkeley, Esq. The tithes have been 
commuted for a rent- charge of 240, and there are about 
2 acres of glebe, and a glebe-house. The church is an 
ancient building, with a white wooden spire, and con- 
tains a curious old font. 

ASTROP, a hamlet, in the parishes of KING'S SUT- 
TON, and NEWBOTTLE, and hundred of KING'S SUTTON, 
union of BRACKLEY, S. division of the county of NORTH- 
AMPTON, 5f miles (W.) from Brackley ; containing 224 
inhabitants. Here is a mineral spring, called St. Rum- 
bald's well, which, in the latter part of the seventeenth 
century, was much frequented. 

ASTWELL, a hamlet, partly in the parish of SYRES- 
HAM, but chiefly in the parish of WAPENHAM, union of 
BRACKLEY, hundred of KING'S SUTTON, S. division of 
the county of NORTHAMPTON, 5^ miles (N. N. E.) from 
Brackley ; containing 46 inhabitants, and comprising, 
with the hamlet of Falcutt, 1790a. 3r. 36>. 

ASTWICK (.ST. GUTHLAKE), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of BIGGLESWADE, county of BEDFORD, 3f 
miles (N. W. by N.) from Baldock ; containing 84 inha- 
bitants. This parish, situated on the road from Baldock 
to Biggleswade, and a little to the north of that between 
Baldock and Shefford, lies on the border of Hertford- 
shire ; it is bounded by the river Ivel, which separates 
it from the parish of Stotfold ; and comprises by mea- 
surement 640 acres of arable land, of which the soil is 
"heavy, and the sub-soil clay. The living is a rectory, 
united, in 1764, to the vicarage of Arlsey, and valued in 
the king's books at 6. 13. 4. 

ASTWOOD (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
NEWPORT-PAGNELL, hundred of NEWPORT, county of 
BUCKINGHAM, 5| miles (E. N. E.) from Newport-Pag- 
nell ; containing 243 inhabitants. This place was at 
the Conquest surveyed as part of the adjoining parish of 
Hardmead, and belonged to William Fitzanculph, from 
whom it descended by marriage to Fulk Paganell, the 
founder of Neport-Pagnell. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 6. 6. 8., and in the pa- 
tronage of the Crown : the tithes have been commuted 
fora rent-charge of 201. 11. 6., and the glebe consists 
of 12 acres. There is a place of worship for Independ- 
ents. 

AS WARE Y (Sr. DENIS), a parish, in the union of 
SLEAFORD, wapentake of ASWARDHURN, parts of KES- 
TEVEN, county of LINCOLN, 4 miles (N. by W.) from 
Folkingham ; containing 1 19 inhabitants. It comprises 
about 1500 acres, and is situated on the road from Lon- 
don to Lincoln. The living is a rectory, valued in the 
king's books at 12. 4. 7. and in the gift of Sir T. 
Whichcote, Bart. : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 327. 12., and there are 47 acres of glebe, 
and a good house. The church is a handsome building 
in the pointed style, and was extensively repaired, and 
its chancel rebuilt, in 1840, at the expense of the patron 
and incumbent. There is a chalybeate spring within 
the limits of the parish. 



ATH E 



A TH E 






ASWARDBY (ST. HELEN), a parish, in the union of 
SPILSBY, hundred of HILL, parts of LINDSEY, county 
of LINCOLN, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Spilsby ; con- 
taining 92 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rec- 
tory, valued in the king's books at 7. 19. 4|. ; net in- 
come, 266 ; patron, R. Brackenbury, Esq. There is a 
place of worship for Wesleyans. 

ATCHAM, a parish, and the head of a union, in the 
Wellington division of the hundred of SOUTH BRAD- 
FORD, N. division of SALOP, 4 miles (S. E. by E.) from 
Shrewsbury ; containing 513 inhabitants. The Roman 
Watling-street passes through the parish, and here crosses 
the Severn. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued 
in the king's books at 11. 6. 8. ; net income, 240 ; 
patron, R. Burton, Esq. ; impropriators, Lord Berwick, 
R. Burton, Esq., and others. A school is supported by 
Mr. Burton ; and divers sums are distributed annually 
among the necessitous, of which the principal is one of 
about 40, arising out of an estate devised by Elizabeth 
Jones, in 1733. The poor law union of Ateham com- 
prises 43 parishes and places, under the care of 44 
guardians. 

ATHELHAMPTON. See ADMISTON. 

ATHELINGTON (Sr. PETER), a parish, in the union 
and hundred of HOXNE, E. division of SUFFOLK, 6 miles 
(S. E. by E.) from Eye ; comprising by measurement 
475 acres, and containing 111 inhabitants. The living 
is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at 
4. 14. 2., and in the patronage of the Crown : the 
tithes payable to the incumbent have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 150, and there are about 16 acres 
of glebe ; other tithes, claimed by the rector of West 
Stow, have been commuted for 192. 5., and he has also 
a glebe here of about 30 acres. The church, which is 
chiefly in the decorated style, consists of a nave and 
chancel, with a square tower. 

ATHERINGTON (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union 
of BARNSTAPLE, hundred of NORTH TAWTON, South 
Molton and N. divisions of DEVON, 7 miles (S. S. E.) 
from Barnstaple ; containing 629 inhabitants. A portion 
of the lands was granted by Matilda, wife of William the 
Conqueror, to the convent of Caen, in Normandy, which 
she had founded ; and in the reign of Henry III. some 
nuns from that establishment settled here, and erected a 
chapel, in which was placed a statue of John of Gaunt, 
Duke of Lancaster, who in the time of Edward III. was 
lord of the manor. During the protectorate of Crom- 
well, Charles II. concealed himself in the parsonage- 
house, and the ancient chamber in which he slept is still 
preserved. The parish, which is situated on the river 
Taw, and intersected by the direct road from Barnstaple 
to Exeter, comprises 33250. 2r. lp., of which 2634 acres 
are arable, 125 meadow, 449 woodland, and 117 rivers 
and roads j the soil is clay. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 26. 2. 1. ; patron and 
incumbent, Rev. James Arthur, whose tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 416, and who has a 
glebe of 200 acres. The church contains a richly orna- 
mented screen and rood-loft crossing the north aisle ; 
also the monument of a crusader, and an altar tomb, 
with the figures of a knight and his two ladies on brass 
plates ; and he statue of John of Gaunt, which was 
removed from the ancient chapel in 1826. A school is 
partly supported by Lady Basset. 

ATHERINGTON, SUSSEX. See ALDRINGTON. 
103 



ATHERLEY (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
DRAYTON, Drayton division of the hundred of NORTH 
BRADFORD, N. division of SALOP, 4 miles (N. by W.) 
from Drayton ; containing 404 inhabitants. It com- 
prises 3/50a. Ir. 23p., of which 962 acres are arable, 
and 2493 pasture and meadow. The living is a rectory, 
valued in the king's books at 11. 6. 0^., and in the 
patronage of the Rev. H. C. Cotton, for the next turn ; 
afterwards of Richard Corbet, Esq. of Atherley Hall. The 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 666. 16., 
and there are about 19 acres of glebe. In 1719, the 
Rev. Robert Adams bequeathed an estate at Winning- 
ton; in the parish of Muckleston, now let for 35. 12. 
per annum, for the education of children, and other 
purposes. 

ATHERSTONE, a market-town, chapelry, and the 
head of a union, in the parish of MANCETTER, Ather- 
stone division of the hundred of HEMLINGFORD, N. 
division of the county of WARWICK, 20 mi]es (N. by E.) 
from Warwick, and 105 (N. W. by N.) from London, 
on the road to Chester ; containing 3743 inhabitants. 
The name of this plar e, in Domesday book written Adere- 
stone, is by Dugdale derived from its Saxon possessor 
Etlred, or Aldred, and thence called Edredestone or Al- 
dredestone ; by others its name is deduced from its situa- 
tion near Mancester, or Mancetter, the Manduessedum 
of the Romans, reckoning from which station here was 
the nearest milliarium on the line of the Watling-street, 
and hence called Hither-stone or Atherstone. In 1485, 
the Earl of Richmond, previously to the battle of Bos- 
worth Field, entered the town on the 20th of August, 
encamped his forces in a meadow, north of the church, 
still called the Royal meadow, and took up his own 
quarters at an ancient inn, no"w the Three Tuns, where 
he passed the night : here he had an interview with 
the Stanleys, and concerted those measures which secured 
him the victory in the celebrated battle that took place 
on the 22nd, and which terminated the war between 
the houses of York and Lancaster. The TOWN consists 
of one principal street, containing many ancient and 
several modern houses, and from which another street 
branches to the market-place ; it is paved, well lighted, 
and amply supplied with water. There is a subscrip- 
tion library and news-room ; and assemblies are held 
occasionally in the town-hall, a neat brick building on 
piazzas. Stone is quarried for road-making and walls ; 
and the manufacture of hats and caps, chiefly of a coarse 
kind, for soldiers and the West India trade, has been 
carried on to a considerable extent ; but since the ter- 
mination of the war, and the abolition of the slave trade, 
it has declined, there being little demand for soldiers' 
caps and none for negroes' hats. The railway from 
Birmingham to Derby passes within five miles of the 
town, and the Coventry and Fazeley canal at the north- 
western extremity, where extensive coal and lime wharfs 
have been constructed. The market, granted in the 31st 
of Henry III., is on Tuesday ; and fairs are held on 
April 7th and July 18th, for cattle; Sept. 19th, 20tb, 
and 21st, for cattle, cheese, and pedlery, on the Tuesday 
after which is a statute-fair ; and on Dec. 4th, which is 
a great show fair for cattle, &c. The county magi- 
strates hold a petty-session weekly j the hundred court 
is held here in rotation with other towns ; and a court 
leet annually, at which constables and other officers are 
appointed. 



A T T E 



The township comprises 842 acres, chiefly pasture 
land. The LIVING is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 
150; patron, Vicar of Mancetter. The chapel is dedi- 
cated to St. Mary ; the ancient part of the edifice is in 
the English style, and formerly belonged to the monks 
of Bee, in Normandy. There are places of worship for 
Independents, Methodists, and Socinians ; also a con- 
vent of the Dominican order, the foundation stone of 
which was laid in Sept. 1 837, and a chapel attached to 
which, dedicated to " Our Blessed Lady of the Rosary," 
was opened Oct. 6th, 1841. A grammar school was 
founded the 5th of Elizabeth, 1573, by Sir William 
Dever.eux, of Merevale, Thomas Fulner, and Amyas Hyll, 
and a charter of incorporation was obtained in 1608 : 
in 1706 the schoolroom was divided, and the grammar 
school is now conducted in one part, and an endowed 
English school hi the other. The endowment amounts 
to 302 per annum, of which the master has 150, and 
the English master 50 ; and 60 are appropriated for 
repairs, contingent expenses, and a building fund ; the 
residue being paid in augmentation of the head master's 
salary : upwards of forty scholars are at present on the 
foundation. There are also a girls' school on the national 
plan, and a boys' school, the buildings for which were 
erected by C. H. Bracebridge, Esq., of Atherstone Hall, 
aided by the Council of Education and the National 
Society. A self-supporting dispensary, upon the plan of 
Mr. Smith, of Southam, established in 1825, affords relief 
to a considerable number of patients. The poor law 
union of Atherstone comprises nine parishes and places 
in the county of Warwick, and five in the county of 
Leicester, and contains a population of 10,866. Dray- 
ton, the poet, and one of the earliest topographical 
writers, was born here. 

ATHERSTONE-UPON-STOUR, a parish, in the 
union of STRATFORD-UPON-AVON, Kington division of 
the hundred of KINGTON, S. division of the county of 
WARWICK, 3 miles (S.) from Stratford ; containing, 
with the village of Ailstow, 93 inhabitants. Nearly sur- 
rounded by the county of Gloucester, this parish con- 
sists of 1042 acres, and is intersected by the river Stour 
and the road from Stratford to Shipston. The living is 
a rectory, valued in the king's books at 13. 1. 8. ; net 
income, 288 ; patron and incumbent, Rev. Thomas 
Cox, D.D. 

ATHERTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of 
LEIGH, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of the 
county of LANCASTER, l mile (N. E.) from Leigh; con- 
taining 4475 inhabitants. This place, through which 
pass the Bolton and Leigh railway and the road from 
Bolton to Warrington, comprises 2323a. 3r. 35p., and 
abounds with valuable stone of a durable quality. Ather- 
ton Hall, a superb edifice, built by the family of that 
name, in the early part of the eighteenth century, at an 
expense of about 63,000, was taken down in 1S25, 
and the materials sold. Two-thirds of the inhabitants 
are employed in the cotton and silk manufacture, in the 
working of extensive collieries, and the making of nails, 
and the remaining third in agricultural pursuits. A 
cattle fair is hejfd in Jan., and holiday fairs in June and 
August. The living, endowed about 1720 by Sir Richard 
Atherton, is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Lord 
Lilford ; net income, 100. A commutation of the tithes 
has been awarded amounting to 118. 4. 8. per annum. 
The chapel, which is dedicated to St. John the Baptist, 
104 



and is a plain structure, rebuilt in 1810, formerly be- 
longed to dissenters, but was consecrated for the service 
of the Church by Dr. Wilson, Bishop of Sodor and Man. 
There are places of worship for Unitarians and Bap- 
tists ; and infants' and day schools were erected in 
1840. 

ATLOW, a parish, in the hundred of APPLETREE, 
S. division of the county of DERBY, 5 miles (E. N. E.) 
from Ashbourn ; containing 156 inhabitants. The 
living is a perpetual curacy ; patron, W. F. Oakover, 
Esq. ; appropriator, Dean of Lincoln, whose tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 110. The 
church is a dilapidated structure, situated in the middle 
of a field. Near the village is a high hill, called " Mag- 
ger's Bush,'' which affords an extensive prospect. 

ATTENBOROUGH (ST. MARY), a parish, in the 
union of SHARDLOW, S. division of the wapentake of 
BROXTOW, N. division of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 
6 miles (S. W.) from Nottingham ; containing, with the 
township of Toton, and the hamlet of Chilwell, 1036 
inhabitants, of whom 124 are in the village of Atten- 
borough. The parish comprises by computation 3460 
acres ; the soil consists of clayey, gravelly, and sandy 
earth, and the surface is diversified with boldly swelling 
undulations. The river Erewash intersects the parish, 
and the Nottingham canal passes through the chapelry 
of Bramcote in the northern part of it, in which place 
there are coal-mines. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
with Bramcote annexed, valued in the king's books at 
4. 15.; net income, 250; patron and impropriator, 
George Saville Foljambe, Esq. The glebe consists of 
about 40 acres. The church is a large edifice, and has 
a tower with five bells, surmounted by a handsome spire. 
In the hamlet of Toton is a chalybeate spring. Atteu- 
borough is the birthplace of Henry Ireton, the son-in- 
law of Cromwell, and lord deputy of Ireland in the 
time of the Commonwealth. 

ATTERBY, a township, in the parish of BISHOP'S 
NORTON, union of CAISTOR, E. division of the wapen- 
take of ASLACOE, parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 
10^: miles (W. N. W.) from Market-Rasen ; containing 
142 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land 
in 1769. Some property, yielding a rent of 8, is 
applied to the repairs of the church. 

ATTERCLIFFE, a chapelry, in the parish and union 
of SHEFFIELD, S. division of the wapentake of STAF- 
FORTH andTiCKHiLL, W. riding of YORK, l^mile^.E.) 
from Sheffield ; containing 4156 inhabitants. This place 
is situated on the road from Sheffield to Worksop and 
Rotherham, and, together with the hamlet of Darnall, 
occupies a triangular area at the south-eastern extremity 
of the parish, bounded on the north by the river Don, 
and on the east by the small river Carbrook. The 
village, one of the largest in the parish, is well built, 
and contains several handsome houses, the principal of 
which are Attercliffe Hall, long the residence of the 
Milner family, New Hall, that of John Sanderson, Esq., 
and the mansion of John Huntsman, Esq. ; and in the 
immediate vicinity are several handsome houses of com- 
paratively modern erection. The manufacture of steel is 
carried on extensively by Mr. Huntsman, and the Messrs. 
Sanderson, and many of the inhabitants are employed 
in making anvils and agricultural implements. At Royds 
Mills is a gold and silver refinery, belonging to Messrs. 
Read and Co. The old chapel of ease, at the eastern 



ATTL 



A T W 1 



extremity of the village, was erected in 1629 b.y Stephen 
Bright, and William Spencer, Esqs., and others of the 
principal inhabitants, who endowed it with 10 per 
annum ; it is now only used for the performance of the 
funeral service, and its extensive cemetery as a place of 
sepulture. Christ church, of which the first stone was 
laid by the Duke of Norfolk, assisted by Earl Fitz- 
williarn, in 1822, was completed at an expense of 
14,000, of which 11,700 were granted by the Par- 
liamentary Commissioners, and consecrated in 1826; it 
is a handsome structure in the later English style, with 
a square embattled tower crowned with pinnacles. The 
living is a perpetual curacy in the patronage of the 
Vicar of Sheffield. There are places of worship for 
Independents and Wesleyans. The town school was built 
by subscription in 1779, and greatly enlarged in 1841, 
partly by aid of a grant from the Committee of Council 
on Education ; it is endowed with 13. 9. 6. per annum, 
arising from a bequest of 300 by Mrs. Fell in 1795. 
The national school for girls was built in 1824. Four 
almshouses, which were occupied by widows rent- 
free, have been rebuilt by the overseers, and are now 
let to tenants at a weekly rent of two shillings each ; 
and there are various bequests for distribution among 
the poor. 

ATTERTON, a hamlet, in the parish of WITHER- 
LEY, union of ATHERSTONE, hundred of SPARKENHOE, 
S. Division of the county of LEICESTER, 3% miles (E. 
by N.) from Atherstone ; containing 84 inhabitants. 

ATTINGTON, an extra-parochial liberty, in the 
hundred of THAME, county of OXFORD, 1 mile (E. by N.) 
from Tetsworth ; containing 8 inhabitants. 

ATTLEBOROUGH, a hamlet, in the parish and 
union of NUNEATON, Atherstone division of the hun- 
dred of HEMLINGFORD, N. division of WARWICKSHIRE ; 
containing 1095 inhabitants, A neat church, in the 
later English style, with a tower and spire, has been 
just completed, containing 511 sittings, of which 347 
are free. 

ATTLEBRIDGE (ST. ANDREW}, a parish, in the 
union of ST. FAITH, hundred of TAVERHAM, E. division 
of NORFOLK, 8 miles (N. W.) from Norwich ; containing 
94 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the 
road from Norwich to Fakenham, comprises 1237. 2r. 
34/>. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to 
the rectory of Alderford, and valued in the king's books 
at 4. 6. 10|. : the vicarial tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 70, and there are 10 acres of 
glebe ; and the impropriate tithes, belonging to N. 
Micklethwait, Esq., lord of the manor, and principal 
owner of the soil, have been commuted for a rent-charge 
of 162. 18. The church is a handsome structure in 
the decorated English style, with a square embattled 
tower. 

ATTLEBURGH, or ATTLEBOROUGH (ST. MARY), 
a market-town and parish, in the union of WAYLAND, 
hundred of SHROPHAM, W. division of NORFOLK, 15 
miles (S. W. by W.) from Norwich, and 94 (N. E. by N.) 
from London ; containing 1959 inhabitants. This 
place derives its name from Atheling, or Attlinge, 
a Saxon chieftain, by whom it is supposed to have 
been originally founded, and from a burgh or for- 
tress, by which it was formerly defended against the 
frequent incursions of the Danes. It was anciently the 
capital of Norfolk, and the residence of Offa and Ed- 
VOL. I. 105 



mund, kings of East Anglia, and was subsequently the 
seat of the Mortimer family, of whose baronial hall 
the site is still encompassed by a moat. In the reign of 
Richard II., Robert de Mortimer founded a collegiate 
establishment, in the church of the Holy Cross, for a 
warden and four secular priests, of which, at the disso- 
lution, the revenue was estimated at 21. 16. 3., and, 
with the site, was granted to the Earl of Essex. The 
TOWN, of which a considerable portion was destroyed by 
fire in 1559, though situated on the high road from 
Thetford to Norwich, is at present, of very inconsidera- 
ble, extent, consisting principally of one long street. The 
market, which is chiefly for corn, is on Thursday ; and 
fairs are held on the Thursday before Easter and Whit- 
suntide, and on the 15th August. The former town 
comprised the two parishes of Attleburgh-Major and 
Minor; the first a rectory, valued in the king's books 
at 19. 8. 9-; and the second a vicarage, valued at 
S. 2. 6. ; they are now united, and the present parish 
comprises 525 la; Ir. 25/>., of which 3955 acres are 
arable, and 1244 meadow and pasture. The livings con- 
stitute one rectory, in the patronage of the Rev. Sir E. 
B. Smyth, Bart. : the tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 1500, and the glebe comprises 17 acres, 
with a handsome parsonage-house. The church is a 
venerable cruciform structure, in the decorated English 
style, with a square embattled tower rising from the 
centre, and a porch of elegant design. There are places 
of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans ; and a parochial 
school, a handsome building, has been erected by sub- 
scription. The patron has allotted 24 acres of land to 
the poor, in small lots for garden-ground ; 57. 2r. 
were also assigned to them at, the time of the inclosure, 
and 20 acres for the repairs of the church. A house 
called the College-house occupies the site of the ancient 
college. There are two springs in the parish, slightly 
chalybeate. 

ATWICK (Sr. LAWRENCE}, a parish, in the \mion 
of SKIRLATIGH, N. division of the wapentake of HOL- 
DERNESS, E, riding of YORK, 2^ miles (N. N. W.) from 
Hornsea ; containing 300 inhabitants. This place has 
passed through various hands, having been possessed 
by the families of Hastings, Mauley, Bigot, Buhner, and 
Constable : St. John's College, Cambridge, now owns 
a portion of the lordship. The parish is bounded on 
the east by the German Ocean, and comprises, includ- 
ing the manors of Arram and Skirlington, about 2186 
acres, of which the soil is a stiff, but very fertile, clay : 
the surface begins to rise here in gentle undulations, 
and prepares the traveller for the hill and dale of the 
wolds ; and the sea-view to Bridlington Quay and 
Flamborough Head is extensive and beautiful. The 
village, of which Atwick Hall forms a conspicuous fea- 
ture, is small but pretty, and pleasantly situated near 
the sea, from whose encroachments it has occasionally 
sustained considerable damage ; and it appears from 
measurements repeated for a series of years, that the 
sea gains from the land an average of three yards 
annually. 

The LIVING is a discharged vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 4. 7. 11., and in the patronage of the 
Lord Chancellor, with a net income of 149 ; impro- 
priator, B. O. Mitford, Esq. The tithes for the town- 
ship of Atwick were commuted for 26a. 3r. of land and 
a money payment of 15, under an act in 1769; and 



A U C K 



A U C K 



under the recent act, the remaining tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 210. 11., of which 107 
for the hamlet of Arram are not payable when in the 
hands of the owner, having been the property of the 
dissolved abbey of Meaux, and therefore exempt. The 
church formerly belonged to the priory of St. Mary, 
Bridlington, to which it was granted by the family of 
de Roos in the 12th century; it is situated at the ex- 
treme end of the village, upon rather elevated ground, 
and consists of a nave and chancel, with a small square 
embattled tower of brick, which last was rebuilt in 1829- 
The present vicar has built, under Gilbert's act, a neat and 
commodious vicarage-house, aided by 200 from Queen 
Anne's Bounty, and a benefaction of similar amount from 
C. Druce, Esq., of Dulwich. A school has an endowment 
of 35 per annum, arising from lands bequeathed by 
Edward Fenwick, in 1689; and Ralph Burton, in 1726, 
left 18 per annum, part of which is appropriated to 
the instruction of girls. In the centre of the village 
stands a rude stone cross of great antiquity, with a 
Latin inscription upon its base, now nearly defaced ; 
and near the church is ground bearing evidence of 
having been the site of a religious house ; also a series 
of fish-ponds, and a " holy well," the water of which is 
inexhaustible, and of the greatest purity. 

ATWORTH, a chapelry, in the parish of GREAT 
BRADFORD, union and hundred of BRADFORD, Westbury 
and N. divisions and Trowbridge and Bradford sub- 
divisions of WILTS, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Bradford; 
containing 824 inhabitants. The chapel, with the ex- 
ception of the tower, was rebuilt a few years since. 

AUBORN (ST. PETER), a parish, in the Lower 
division of the wapentake of BOOTH BY-GRAFFO, parts 
of. KESTEVEN, union and county of LINCOLN, 63. miles 
(S. W. by S.) from Lincoln ; containing, with a part of 
the township of Haddington, 436 inhabitants. The 
living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 7. 13. 10. ; net income, 54 ; patron, Rev. H. 
Neville. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 
9 per annum, arising from a bequest of Sir Christopher 
Neville, are distributed among the poor. 

AUBURN, county of YORK. See FRAISTHORPE. 
AUCKLAND (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of AUCKLAND, partly in the S. E., but chiefly in the 
N. W., division of DARLINGTON ward, S. division of the 
county of DURHAM ; the S. E. portion including the 
townships of Byers- Green, Coundon- Grange, Eldon, 
JVJiddlestone, Midridge, Midridge- Grange, Old-Park, 
Westerton, and Windleston ; and the N. W. portion 
including the market-town of Bishop-Auckland, the 
chapelries of St. Helen-Auckland and Hamsterley, and 
the townships of St. Andrew- Auckland, West Auckland, 
North and South Bedburn, Barony, Binchester, Coundon, 
Evenwood, Hunwick with Helmington, Lynesack with 
Softley, Newfield, Newton-Cap, Pollard's Lauds, Shildon, 
and East Thickley ; the whole containing 19,100 in- 
habitants, of whom 1367 are in the township of St. 
Andrew-Auckland, 1 mile (S.) from Bishop-Auckland. 
This extensive parish comprises by computation 11,195 
acres, and contains numerous townships, in six of which 
are considerable villages ; it abounds with coal and 
limestone, and its surface is highly varied. The Stockton 
and Darlington railroad passes through it ; and in 1837 
an act was obtained for constructing the Bishop -Auck- 
land and Weardale railway, which branches from the 
106 



Stockton, and Darlington at Shildon, and passes within 
a quarter of a mile of Bishop-Auckland, which see. 

The LIVING is a perpetual curacy, with the chapelry 
of St. Anne ; net income, about 550, nearly half of 
which arises from a bequest by the late Bishop Barring- 
ton ; patron, Bishop of Durham ; imp.ropriators, Land- 
owners of the parish. The tithes attached to the living 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 46. 10. ; and 
there is a glebe valued at 117 per annum. The church, 
a spacious cruciform structure, was made collegiate for 
the secular canons ejected by Bishop Carileph from his 
cathedral of Durham, in 1082 ; and in 1292 was endowed 
by Bishop Beck for a dean and nine prebendaries : three 
or four additional prebends were founded by Bishop 
Langley, in 1428. At the dissolution, the deanery was 
valued at 100. 7. 2., and the prebends at 79. 16. 8. : 
the dean's house and some of the prebendal houses have 
been converted into residences for farmers. There are 
a chapel of ease at Bishop-Auckland ; a district church 
lately consecrated at Coundon ; another, also lately con- 
secrated, in the newly-assigned district of Etherley ; and 
a third just erected by subscription at Byers-Green : 
and there are places of worship for Independents, Ran- 
ters, and the Society of Friends. A free grammar school 
was founded by charter of James I., and in the parish 
are national schools for boys and girls. The poor law 
union of Auckland comprises 33 parishes and places, 
and contains a population of 21,979. 

AUCKLAND (ST. HELEN), a chapelry, in the parish 
of ST. ANDREW-AUCKLAND, union of AUCKLAND, N. W. 
division of DARLINGTON ward, S. division of the county 
of DURHAM, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from Bishop-Auckland ; 
containing in the township of St. Helen- Auckland (which 
constitutes only a small portion of the chapelry), 720 
inhabitants. At this place is the terminus of the Stock- 
ton and Darlington railway for passengers, the remaining 
portion of the line being confined to the transmission of 
the coal waggons. At the St. Helen's colliery numerous 
ovens are employed in the manufacture of coke for the 
use of the engines on the line. Large quantities of coal 
are sent by the railway from the mines in the neigh- 
bourhood to be shipped at Stockton and Middlesborough 
on the Tees. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in 
the king's books at 13. 9. 4., and in the gift of the 
Bishop of Durham : the net income, previously 138, 
was augmented by the late bishop, Dr. Van Mildert. 
The impropriate tithes, belonging to the landowners, 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 119. 1. 6., 
and those of the perpetual curate for one of 6. 7. ; and 
there is a glebe of 23 acres. 

AUCKLAND, BISHOP, a market-town and chapelry, 
in the parish of ST. ANDREW^AUCKLAND, union of 
AUCKLAND, N. W. division of DARLINGTON ward, S. 
division of the county of DURHAM, 10| miles (S. W.) 
from Durham, and 252 (N. by W.) from London ; con- 
taining 3776 inhabitants. This place, in common with 
others in the immediate vicinity, derives its name from 
the great number of oak trees that formerly grew in the 
neighbourhood, and its prefix from an episcopal palace, 
in which the bishops of the diocese, who are lords of the 
manor, occasionally reside. The town; which is in the 
centre of the parish, is pleasantly situated on a con- 
siderable eminence, near the confluence of the rivers 
Gaunless and Wear, in a fertile district, abounding with 
coal and limestone, and remarkable for the salubrity of 



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the air : the streets are badly paved, but the houses are 
well built, and the inhabitants are plentifully supplied 
with water. The palace, originally erected in the reign 
of Edward I. by Bishop Anthony Beck, and subsequently 
enlarged, was much injured by Sir Arthur Haslerigg, to 
whom it was sold by the Parliamentary Commissioners, 
but after the Restoration it was repaired by Bishop 
Cosins : it stands in a beautiful park to the north-east 
of the town, and is a spacious structure, surrounded 
with plantations and pleasure-grounds watered by the 
Gaunless. The chapel attached to the palace is a fine 
edifice, in the early and decorated styles, and was built 
originally by Bishop Beck, and repaired, about 1660, by 
Bishop Cosins, whose remains are deposited in it. The 
market is on Thursday ; and the fairs are in March and 
October, but on no fixed day. The Bishop-Auckland 
and Weardale railway, constructed chiefly for the con- 
veyance of coal, and a few passengers, branches off from 
the Stockton and Darlington railway at Shildon, to con- 
nect that line with the Witton Park colliery, and passes 
near the town ; it takes a course of eight miles, and 
terminates by a short branch in the township of Crook. 
It passes over numerous embankments and bridges in 
its progress, and through several tunnels, and various 
roads are carried over it by bridges : the embankment 
at Holdforth alone cost 1 1,000, and the line was com- 
pleted at an expense of 96,000, of which 72,000 were 
raised in original shares, and the remainder by loan. 
The county magistrates hold petty-sessions monthly; 
and courts leet and baron are held annually, at the 
former of which a bailiff and other officers are ap- 
pointed. 

The LIVING is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of 
the Bishop of Durham : the chapel, dedicated to St. 
Anne, is small, and very inadequate to the purposes for 
which it was designed. There are places of worship for 
the Society of Friends, Independents, and Wesleyans. 
The free grammar school was founded by James I., and 
is endowed with land, a house and garden for the 
master, and a rent-charge, producing an income of 
about 60 per annum ; the management is vested in 
twelve governors, who are a body corporate, and have 
a common seal : the schoolroom, over which is St. 
Anne's chapel, was rebuilt in 17*3. A school for twenty 
boys was founded by Mr. Walton, in 1772. A central 
school on Dr. Bell's system, for 200 children, was esta- 
blished in 1810, by Bishop Barrington, who also founded 
a school of industry for girls, in 1815 : there are apart- 
ments for the master and usher, and for a housekeeper 
and female servant, also accommodation for persons 
admitted to learn the duties of schoolmasters on the 
national system ; about thirty of the boys are clothed, 
and the average annual expenditure amounts to 367. 
Almshouses for two men and two women were founded 
and endowed by Bishop Cosins, in the reign of Charles 
II.; the inmates are clothed every third year, and re- 
ceive an allowance of about 15 per annum each. 

AUCKLAND, WEST, a township, in the parish of 
ST. ANDREW-AUCKLAND, union of AUCKLAND, N. W. 
division of DARLINGTON ward, S. division of the county 
of DURHAM, 3| miles (S. W. by S.) from Bishop-Auck- 
land; containing 2310 inhabitants. This place is situ- 
ated at the junction of the high road from Durham to 
Barnard Castle with that from Darlington to Wolsing- 
ham ; the river Gaunless winds in a devious course 
107 



through the township, and the railway from Stockton 
to Witton Park extends along its eastern extremity, and 
has a principal station near the village. A court leet, 
for the recovery of debts under 40s. is held twice a-year. 
There is a place of worship for Wesleyans ; and a free 
school, founded by Mrs. Margaret Hubback in 1798, is 
endowed with about 30 per annum, and conducted on 
the national plan. The place gives the title of Baron to 
the family of Eden, who formerly resided here : the 
estates now belong to Sir R. J. Eden, Bart. 

AUDENSHAW, a division, in the parish and union 
of AsHTON-UNDER-LiNE, hundred of SALFORD, S. divi- 
sion of the county of LANCASTER, 5 miles (E. by S.) 
from Manchester ; comprising the villages of Auden- 
shaw, Hooleyhill, Littlemoss, North-street, Walkmill, 
and Woodhouses, and containing 5374 inhabitants. The 
name of this place, in ancient documents written Ald- 
winshagh, is said to be derived from the Saxon Aldwin, 
an elder or chieftain, and Shagh, a wood. It is sup- 
posed to have belonged, prior to the Conquest, to some 
Saxon thane, whose residence was on or near the site of 
the present village, which exhibits appearances of earlier 
cultivation than the surrounding district, the latter con- 
sisting mostly of woods and morasses. A small hamlet 
in the division derives its name of Danehead from its 
situation at the head of an extensive valley called " the 
Danes," probably from some battle which took place 
there between that people and the Saxons : it is tra- 
versed by a stream which falls into the river Mersey. 
The Ashton-under-Line canal passes through the divi- 
sion, and a large reservoir has been constructed here for 
supplying the town of Manchester with water. The 
inhabitants are chiefly employed in the various branches 
of the hat manufacture, and in weaving. There is a 
place of worship for Methodists of the New Connexion. 
A parochial school was founded about the year 1745, 
and endowed by Miles Hilton with two estates in the 
parish of Manchester, producing 40 per annum ; the 
schoolroom, with a large house for the master, was 
erected at an expense of nearly 1000, defrayed partly 
by subscription, and partly by the appropriation of the 
income arising from the endowment. 

AUDLEBY, a hamlet, in the parish and union of 
CAISTOR, S. division of the wapentakeof YARBOROUGH, 
parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN; containing 28 
inhabitants. 

AUDLEM (Sr, JAMES), a parish, partly in the union 
of DRAYTON, but chiefly in that of NANTWICH, hundred 
of NANTWICH, S. division of the county of CHESTER; 
comprising the townships of Audlem, Buerton, Hanke- 
low, and Tittenley, and part of Dodcot cum Wilkesley ; 
and containing 2S27 inhabitants, of whom 1621 are in the 
township of Audlem, 6 miles (S.) from Nantwich. A 
grant of a weekly market, and a fair on the eve, day, 
and morrow of St. James the Apostle, was obtained in 
the 24th of Edward I., both which, after long disuse, 
were revived a few years since. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 5. 16. 8., and in the 
patronage of Sir R. S. Cotton, Bart. There is a place 
of worship for Particular Baptists. A free grammar 
school was endowed about the middle of the seventeenth 
century, by Mr. Ralph Bolton, with 20 per annum, 
and a similar sum arising from a bequest of Mr. Thomas 
Gammull, both of London ; 40 were also given for its 
benefit by the Rev. William Evans. There is likewise 

P2 



AUGH 



AUKL 



a preparatory English school for younger boys and 
girls, endowed by Tryphena, the widow of Mr. Ralph 
Bolton, of Hankelow, with a modus of the tithe of hay, 
and a house and half an acre of land ; and a school for 
girls, commenced in 1833, is supported by Miss War- 
burton. 

AUDLEY (ST. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LTNE, N. division of the hundred of 
PIREHILL, and of the county of STAFFORD, 5 miles 
(N. W.) from Newcastle ; containing 4474 inhabitants, 
and consisting of the townships of Audley, Bignall End, 
Eardley-End, Halmer-End, Knowl-End, Park-End, and 
Talk-o'-th'-Hill. This place was originally given by 
Hervey de Stafford to the barons of Aldeleigh, or Audley, 
who erected the baronial residence called Heyley Castle, 
of which there are still some remains, occupying the 
summit of a steep rock near the south- western boundary 
of the parish, and commanding extensive views over the 
surrounding country. The parish, which comprises up- 
wards of 1200 acres, and is almost entirely appropriated 
to dairy farming, abounds with excellent iron-stone and 
coal, the latter of which is sent in large quantities by 
the Trent and Mersey canal to Cheshire, and to other 
parts. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 6, 13. 4; : the vicarial tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 430, and the impro- 
priate, belonging to George Toilet, Esq., the patron, for 
one of 664. The church is in the early style of English 
architecture, with an .embattled tower crowned with 
pinnacles. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. 
The free grammar school, founded in 1622 by Edward 
Vernon, Esq., has an endowment in land producing 
125. 18. per annum ^ and a free school at Talk-o'-th'- 
Hill, in which writing and arithmetic are taught, is en- 
dowed with land yielding a rent of 13. A national 
school has also been erected. Near the village are ves- 
tiges of an intrenchment, and on the western boundary 
of the parish are situated, on a lofty rock, the remains 
of the ancient and strong castle of Heyley, or Heleigh, 
the ascent to which, on the south side, is more than 
100 yards in height. Audley gives the title of Baron to 
the family of Touchet. 

AUGHTON, a chapelry, in the parish of H ALTON, 
hundred of LONSDALE, south of the Sands, N. division of 
the county of LANCASTER; containing L34 inhabitants. 
The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, 140 ; 
patron, Rector of Halton; impropriators, Rector of 
Halton, Vicar of Lancaster, .and R. F. Bradshaw, Esq. 
The chapel is dedicated to St. George. 

AUGHTON (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of ORMSKIRK, hundred of WEST DERBY, S. division of 
the county of LANCASTER, 2 miles (S. W.) from Orms- 
kirk ; containing 1560 inhabitants. It comprises 3Q43a. 
14;>., and is intersected by the Liverpool and Wigan 
canal. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 14. 15. 5. ; net income, 676 ; patron, John 
Plumbe Tempest, Esq. The tithes were commuted, 
under an inclosure act, for 35 acres of land, and the 
glebe comprises 9^ acres. The church is an ancient 
building, with a steeple in the centre. There are two 
Roman Catholic chapels. 

AUGHTON (ALL SOULS), a parish, partly in the 

union of HOWDEN, and partly in that of POCKLINGTON, 

Holme Beacon division of the wapentake of HARTHILL, 

E. riding of YORK; containing, with the chapelry of 

108 



East Cottingwith and the township of Laytham, 634 
inhabitants, of whom 217 are in the township of Augh- 
ton, 8| miles (N. N. W.) from Howden. The parish is 
situated on the left bank of the navigable river Derwent, 
and presents a tolerably level surface. The living is a 
discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at 4 ; 
net income, 90, with a glebe-house, erected in 1839 by 
the Rev. John Earle, incumbent ; patron, James Fletcher, 
Esq. The church, of which the chancel was rebuilt in 
1839, has a low embattled tower, built by Christopher, 
son of the unfortunate Robert Aske, who was beheaded 
and hung in chains at York in the reign of Henry VIII., 
1537, as a principal in the insurrection called the " Pil- 
grimage of Grace," occasioned by the suppression of 
the monasteries. On the chancel floor is a fine brass 
slab, on which are graven the effigies of Richard Aske 
and his lady, who died in the fifteenth century. There 
is a parochial school, established by the Rev. J. Earle. 
Near the east bank of the river Derwent, the moats and 
trenches of an ancient castle are still visible ; and in the 
vicinity of the church is a large mound of earth, cele- 
brated as the site of the castellated mansion of the Aske 
family. 

AUGHTON, a township, in the parish of ASTON, 
union of ROTHERHAM, S. division 1 of the wapentake of 
STRAFFORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, Smiles 
(E.) from Sheffield; containing 108 inhabitants. This 
place, called in Domesday book Ac-tone, Hactone, and 
Hacstone, was formerly the residence of the family of 
West, of whom was Sir William West, a soldier in the 
army of Henry VIII., and who had, in reward for his 
services, beneficial grants of abbey lands : the family 
resided here till the latter end of the reign of Elizabeth. 
The township, which is situated on the Rotherham and 
Mansfield road, is separated from the county of Derby by 
the river Rother ; the surface is varied, and the scenery 
pleasingly diversified : coal is found, and there is a mine 
at present in operation. The North-Midland railway 
passes through the township. Aughton Hall, the seat of 
Robert C. Hoyle, Esq., is a handsome residence. There 
are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans, 
the latter built in 1843, on a site given by Mr. Hoyle. 

AUKBOROUGH (Sr.JoHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, 
in the union of GLANDFRD-BRIGG, N. division of the 
wapentake of MANLEY, parts of LINDSEY, county of 
LINCOLN, 10^ miles (W.) from Barton-upon-H umber ; 
containing, with the hamlet of Walcot, 528 inhabitants. 
The living is a discharged vicarage, with the rectory of 
Whitton united, valued in the king's books at 10; 
net income, 209 ; patrons, Bishop of Lincoln and M. 
Constable, Esq., the latter of whom is impropriator and 
lord of the manor. The vicarial tithes of Aukborough 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 12. 2. 4., 
and the incumbent has also a glebe of 53 acres. There 
is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A free school is 
endowed with 16. 13.4. per annum ; and there are also 
other schools, partly supported by Mr. Constable. An 
almshouse, containing ten rooms, is occupied by ten 
poor persons ; and a rent-charge of 2 has been 
assigned on the inclosure, between the parish clerk and 
the poor. The place is thought by Dr. Stukeley to have 
been the Arquis of the geographer of Ravennas. 

AUXLEY, a township, in the parish of FINNING- 
LEY, union of DONCASTER, partly in the Hatfield divi- 
sion of the wapentake of BASSETLAW, N. division of the 



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county of NOTTINGHAM, and partly in the soke of DON- 
CASTER, W. riding of the county of YORK, 5^ miles (N.) 
from Bawtry ; containing 418 inhabitants. This town- 
ship comprises about 2391 acres, of which 827 are in 
the Nottinghamshire portion. In 1S38, a chapel of ease 
was erected at a cost of 700, containing 250 sittings ; 
and there is a plaf e of worship for Wesleyans. 

AULT-HUCKNALL, a parish, in the union of 
MANSFIELD, hundred of SCARSDALE, N. division of the 
county of DERBY, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Mans- 
field ; containing, with the hamlets of Rowthorne and 
Stainsby, 678 inhabitants, and comprising by measure- 
ment 4285 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 6. 0. 5. ; patron and 
impropriator, Duke of Devonshire. The vicarial tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 105, and 
there are more than 27 acres of glebe ; the impropriate 
tithes have been commuted for 34. At Hardwicke, in 
the parish, is a school, towards the support of which 
Thomas Whitehead, in 17*29, bequeathed a house and 
land producing 23. 15. per annum ; it is also endowed 
with property in the parish of Edensor. 

AULTON, county of DERBY. See ALLTON. 

AUNSBY (Sr. THOMAS a BECKET), a parish, in the 
union of SLEAFORD, wapentake of ASWARDHURN, parts 
of KESTEVEN, county of LINCOLN, 5 miles (N. W. byW.) 
from Falkingham ; containing 117 inhabitants. It is 
situated on the road from Lincoln to London, and 
comprises 10S9 acres. The living is a rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 6. 0. 7^-, and in the patronage 
of J. A. Houblon, Esq. : the tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 249, and there are about 1 1 acres 
of glebe and a glebe-house. The church, which is in 
the early English style, is a small edifice, having in the 
windows some remains of beautifully stained glass : the 
font also has some remarkable ornaments. 

AUST, a chapelry, in the parish of HENBURY, union 
of THORNBURY, Upper division of the hundred of HEN- 
BURY, W. division of the county of GLOUCESTER, 4^ 
miles (W. S. W.) from Thornbury ; containing 191 in- 
habitants. This place derived its name, anciently lustre 
Clive, signifying "the southern cliffs," from its situation 
on the south bank of the Severn, among bold and lofty 
cliffs projecting into the river, which is here two miles 
in breadth. About half a mile below the village, which 
is surrounded by salt marshes, and immediately opposite 
to the estuary formed by the junction of the Severn and 
the Wye, is the ferry called the Old Passage, supposed 
to have been the site of the ancient Fectis of the Romans. 
Alabaster is procured in great quantities ; and those 
rare minerals, the sulphate and carbonate of strontian, 
are found in the cliffs which line the banks of the 
Severn, and which abound with various fossil remains. 
The chapel is in the ancient English style. The place 
is distinguished as having been the residence of Wyeliffe, 
the celebrated reformer. 

AUSTELL, ST. (THE HOLY TRINITY), a market- 
town, parish, and the head of a union, in the E. division 
of the hundred of POWDER and of the county of CORN- 
WALL, 34 miles (S. W.) from Launceston, and 252 
(W. S. W.) from London; containing 10,320 inhabit- 
ants. This place, in the reign of Henry VIII., was an 
obscure village, arid first rose into importance from its 
vicinity to Polgooth and other considerable mines. In 
the civil war, the town, in which part of the army 
109 



under the Earl of Essex had been quartered, was taken 
by Charles I. a short time prior to the capitulation of 
the parliamentarians near Lostwithiel, in 1644. In 1760 
the great road from Plymouth to the Land's End was 
brought through this place, which is now a considera- 
ble thoroughfare. The TOWN is pleasantly situated in a 
well-cultivated district, on the south side of a hill slop- 
ing gradually to a small stream ; the streets are paved, 
and lighted with gas, and the inhabitants are well sup- 
plied with water. The trade principally consists of the 
produce of its numerous mines of tin and copper, and in 
china-stone and clay of a very superior quality, which 
are found here in great abundance; the manufacture of 
coarse woollen cloth is also carried on to a small extent. 
The mines in the vicinity are exceedingly productive, 
and, from the improved manner of working them, 
promise continued prosperity to the town, the popula- 
tion of which has been trebled within the last twenty 
years. The parish comprises about 11,000 acres: 
freestone of excellent quality abounds ; and near the 
harbour of Pentewan is a very extensive quarry, from 
which have been raised materials for the erection of 
many churches and mansions in the county. Several 
harbours have been formed in different parts. Many 
vessels are engaged in the importation of coal from 
Wales, for the use of the mines, and in the exportation 
of copper-ore for smelting, and of china-stone and clay 
to the different potteries, and for the use of linen- 
bleachers. The principal part of the grain tin produced 
in Cornwall is obtained here, and blowing-houses for 
melting it have been erected near the town. A consi- 
derable pilchard fishery is also carried on, in which 
many boats, fitted out from the different harbours, are 
employed. The market, which is considerable for corn 
and provisions, is on Friday; and there are fairs on 
the Thursday next after Palm-Sunday, the Thurs- 
day after Whit-Sunday, the nearest Friday to July 
23rd, and on Nov. 30th. In 1842 an act was ob- 
tained for providing a new market-place, removing 
the old market-house, erecting a new one, and regulating 
the markets and fairs. The town is within the jurisdic- 
tion of the county magistrates, by whom constables 
and other officers are appointed ; and the Blackmore, 
the most considerable of the stannary courts, is held 
here. 

The LIVING is a vicarage, with that of St. Blazey an- 
nexed, valued in the king's books at 21, and in the pa- 
tronage of the Crown; impropriators, Miss Rashleigh, 
and J. B.Tremayne, Esq. The tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 537. 16., and the glebe comprises 
about an acre, with a large garden. The church combines 
various styles of English architecture, and has a very 
handsome tower richly ornamented with sculpture. 
There are places of worship for Baptists, Bryanites, 
Calvinists, the Society of Friends, Primitive and Wes- 
leyan Methodists, Warrenites, and Plymouth Brethren ; 
and a national school has been erected. The poor law 
union of St. Austell comprises fifteen parishes and places, 
and contains a population of 31,417. At Menacuddle 
and Towan, in the parish, are baptismal wells, over 
which are ancient buildings in the early English style, 
covered with arched roofs of granite. In one of the 
celebrated tin stream-works of Pentewan, the bones of 
men, of oxen of enormous size, of a whale, and of animals 
now unknown, have been found. 



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AUSTERFIELD, a chapelry, in the parish of BLYTH, 
union of DONCASTER, N. division of the wapentake of 
STRAFFORTH and TICKHILL, W. riding of YORK, l 
mile (N. N. E.) from Bawtry ; containing 314 inhabit- 
ants. This place is in Domesday book called Oustre- 
field, and derives its name probably from some old form 
of the cardinal point of the compass, east ; though it is 
said by some to be derived from the Roman general 
Ostorius, who was defeated here by the Britons. It has 
been the property of the families of Busli, Vipont, De 
Spenser, and Neville, from whom it passed to the crown ; 
and has since descended, with Bawtry, to the present 
owner. The township comprises 2710 acres, including 
the hamlet of Brancroft and Fiuningley Park. The 
chapelry is a curacy annexed to Bawtry : the small 
tithes for the common were commuted for land in 1765. 

AUSTERSON, a township, in the parish of ACTON, 
union and hundred of NANTWICH, S. division of the 
county of CHKSTER ; containing 55 inhabitants. The 
vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 
20. 3. 5., and the impropriate for one of 91. 12. 

AUSTHORPE, a township, in the parishes of WHIT- 
KIRK and GARTFORTH, Lower division of the wapentake 
of SKYRACK, W. riding of YORK, 3| miles (E.) from 
Leeds ; containing 173 inhabitants. It is situated near 
the railway and turnpike-road from Leeds to Selby. The 
impropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent- charge 
of 150. 6., payable to Trinity College, Cambridge, and 
the vicarial for one of 6. 19. ; and there is also a glebe 
of about 2^ acres. John Smeaton, distinguished as a 
civil engineer, and who rebuilt the Eddystone lighthouse, 
was born here in 1724. 

AUSTHWAITE, with BIRKER, a township, in the 
parish of MILLOM, union of BOOTLE, ALLERDALE ward 
above Derwent, W. division of CUMBERLAND j contain- 
ing 105 inhabitants. It is situated on the south side of 
the river Esk, and contains the lake Devockwater, and 
the waterfalls of Birker Force and Stanley Gill. The 
inhabitants marry, bury, &c. at the chapel of Eskdale. 

AUSTONLEY, a township, in the parish of AL- 
MONDBURY, union of HUDDERSFIELD, Upper division of 
the wapentake of AGBRIGG, W. riding of YORK, 7 miles 
(S. S. W.) from Huddersfield ; containing 1940 inhabit- 
ants, who are mostly engaged in the manufacture of 
woollen cloth, for which there are numerous mills. The 
district comprises 321 9a.2r. 12p., and consists of a deep 
valley, and large tracts of mountain and moor. A dis- 
trict church, dedicated to St. David, was erected at a 
cost of about 2500 at Holme-bridge, by subscription, 
in 1828, for the accommodation of the inhabitants of 
this township and Holme. A parsonage-house is in 
course of erection ; and a school has recently been built. 

AUSTREY (ST. NICHOLAS), a parish, in the union 
of TAMWORTH, Tamworth division of the hundred of 
HEMLINGFORD, N. division of the county of WARWICK, 
6 miles (E. N. E.) from Tamworth; containing 4/9 in- 
habitants. The parish is situated in the northern part 
of the county, on the border of Leicestershire, which 
bounds it on the east ; and consists of 2080 acres. The 
living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 8, and 
in the patronage of the Crown ; net income, 162. A 
school is endowed with the interest of 150, bequeathed 
by the late Miss Toon, and is also supported, partly by 
the trustees of a charity for apprenticing boys and other 
purposes, and partly by subscription. 
110 



AUSTWICK, a township, in the parish of CLAPHAM, 
union of SETTLE, W. division of the wapentake of 
STAINCLIFFE and EWCROSS, W. riding of YORK, 4 miles 
(N. W.) from Settle ; containing 599 inhabitants. This 
place, in the Domesday survey " Oustewic," belonged in 
the reign of Henry V. to John de Harrington, on whose 
death without issue it passed to his brother, and was 
by him conveyed to Sir Arthur D'Arcy, who, in 1547, 
sold it to John Redmayne. The manor, in 1551, became 
the property of the Duke of Suffolk, from whom it 
passed to Sir John Yorke, who, in 1559, sold it to Sir 
Richard Shuttleworth, in whose family it remained till 
1782, when it was purchased by the late James Farrer, 
Esq., father of the present proprietor. The township, 
which includes the hamlet of Wharfe, and part of that 
of Feizor, is situated beneath the shelter of a rocky and 
precipitous projection of the Ingleborough mountain ; 
and comprises by computation 5400 acres, a considerable 
portion of which is freehold, and leasehold on long leases ; 
the lands are chiefly in pasture, and the population is 
partly employed in agriculture, and partly in the weaving 
of cotton. The village is neatly built, and a fair for 
cattle is held on the Thursday before Whitsuntide, and 
is generally well attended. A chapel of ease was erected 
in 1840, at the expense of Charles Ingleby, Esq. and his 
sister, the late Miss E. A. Ingleby, and is a neat struc- 
ture, containing 370 sittings, of which 70 are free ; the 
living is held with the vicarage of Clapham, and endowed 
by the principal proprietors with 44 per annum, since 
increased by a bequest from Miss Ingleby of 26 per 
annum. Attached to the church are a good glebe- 
house and a Sunday schoolroom, erected by the 
founders. Lawrence Banks, in the reign of James I., 
bequeathed lands now producing 12 per annum, of 
which one moiety was appropriated to the poor of this 
township in conjunction with those of Clapham, Newby, 
and Lawkland. Isabella Sherburne, in 1693, left 45 
to the poor of the place, for which, with some smaller 
bequests, 4. 15. 6. is paid as interest by the overseers ; 
and in 1818, Elizabeth Ingleby bequeathed 10 per 
annum to the poor, charged on the estate of Charles 
Ingleby, Esq., by whom it is distributed among them. 
Richard Green, Esq., in 1750, left 50 to the poor, and 
Thomas Green, Esq. a rent-charge of 3 to the school- 
master for instructing six children ; and Ann Hargreave 
also bequeathed 3 per annum, for teaching three chil- 
dren. 

AUTHORPE (Sr. MARGARET), a parish, in the union 
of LOUTH, Wold division of the hundred of LOUTH-ESKE, 
parts of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 6f miles (N. W.) 
from Alford ; containing 117 inhabitants. It comprises 
92 la. Ir. 13p., including roads; the substratum is a 
chalk rock of good quality, which is burnt into lime. 
The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's 
books at 5. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Robert 
Vyner, Esq. : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 158, and there are 29 acres of glebe. The 
church is an ancient structure. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans. 5. 10. per annum are paid to 
the rector for charitable uses from Taylor's charity. 

AVEBURY (8r. JAMES), a parish, in the union of 
MARLBOROUGH, hundred of SELKLEY, Marlborough and 
Ramsbury, and N. divisions of WILTS, 6f miles (W. by 
S.) from Marlborough; containing, with the tythings of 
Beckhampton and Kennet, 75 1 inhabitants. This parish, 



A V EN 



A V I N 



in which the river Kennet has its source, comprises 
about 4641 acres ; the soil is a light earth, resting on 
chalk, and the surface undulated. The village is built 
on a portion of the area anciently occupied, by a stu- 
pendous monument, called Abury, supposed to have 
been constructed by the Britons, for the purposes of 
religious worship or national assemblies. It consisted 
of an extensive ditch and rampart, including double 
circles of large unhewn stones, many of which have been 
broken, and used as materials for building the houses in 
the village, and for other purposes. In the vicinity are 
several barrows, and among them the very large and 
remarkable one, close to the turnpike-road, called 
Silbury hill, which covers an area of five acres and 
thirty-four perches, and exceeds in dimensions every 
similar work in Great Britain, being 2027 feet in cir- 
cumference at the base, and 120 at the summit ; its 
sloping height, 316 feet, and its perpendicular height, 
170 feet. Within a short distance of this are remark- 
able stones, termed the Grey Wethers, and about a mile 
north of the village is a cromlech. The living is a dis- 
charged vicarage, to which that of Winterbourne-Monk- 
ton was united in 1747, valued in the king's books at 9 ; 
net income, 178 ; patron, the Crown ; impropriators, the 
family of Hopkins. The glebe consists of 16 acres. The 
church is of Norman architecture. In 1722, Susannah 
Holford bequeathed 200, directing the interest to be 
applied to the instruction of children. An alien priory, 
dependent on the Benedictine abbey of Bocherville, in 
Normandy, was founded here in the reign of Henry I. 
Robert of Avebury, who wrote a history of Edward III., 
is supposed to have been a native of the place. 

AVELEY (ST. MICHAEL), a parish (formerly a 
market-town), in the union of ORSETT, hundred of 
CHAFFORD, S. division of ESSEX, If mile (N. E.) from 
Purfleet, and 7 miles (S. S. E.) from Romford ; contain- 
ing 849 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises by 
computation 2615 acres, is separated from that of West 
Thurrock by the creek Marditch. The village, though 
now small, was formerly a market-town of some im- 
portance. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in 
the king's books at 14. 10. 5. ; patron, Bishop of 
London ; appropriators, Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's. 
The great tithes have been commuted for a rent- charge 
of 453, 15., and the vicarial for 327; the appropriate 
glebe consists of 30 acres, and there is one acre of 
vicarial glebe. The church is an ancient edifice, with a 
square tower of flint and stone, formerly surmounted by 
a lofty spire, which was blown down in 1703. An en- 
dowed almshouse, originally founded by Lord Newburgh 
in 1639, was rebuilt in 1745, by Lord Dacre ; and a 
farm in the parish is charged with an annual payment 
of 6, divided among the poor. 

AVENBURY (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
BROMYARD, hundred of BROXASH, county of HEREFORD, 
1| mile (S. E.) from Bromyard ; containing 382 inha- 
bitants. The parish is intersected from north to south 
by the river Frome, and also by the road from Bromyard 
to Ledbury, and comprises 3178 acres, including about 
200 acres of hop grounds ; a small portion of limestone 
is found within its limits. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 7- 8. 9. ; net income, 
49 ; patron, the Crown ; impropriator, E. Higginson, 
Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 422. 15., and who has a glebe of 60 acres. 
Ill 



The church and its large endowments were anciently 
attached to the abbey of Dore. 

AVENING (ST. MARY), a parish, in the union of 
STROUD, hundred of LONGTRKE, E. division of the 
county of GLOUCESTER, 3 miles (N.) from Tetbury; 
containing 2227 inhabitants. It has lately been made 
a polling-place for the eastern division of the county. 
The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at 
24, and in the patronage of the Heirs of the late Dr. 
Brooke : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 760, and the glebe comprises 104 acres. The 
church is supposed to have been built by the abbess of 
Caen, in Normandy, to whom the manor belonged till 
the suppression of alien priories, in the reign of Henry 
V. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists ; 
also an endowed school in which six boys are clothed 
and educated. 

AVERHAM (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the union 
of SOUTHWELL, N. division of the wapentake of THUR- 
GARTON, S. division of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 
3^ miles (W. by N.) from Newark ; containing, with 
the township of Staythorpe, 264 inhabitants. This 
place suffered from the hostilities of the contending 
parties during the parliamentary war in the reign of 
Charles I., and at the time of the siege of Newark many 
skirmishes occurred here ; in 1644, the ancient manor- 
house, then belonging to Robert Sutton, Lord Lexing- 
ton and Baron of Averham, and which had been the 
residence of the family from 1250, was destroyed. The 
parish comprises by measurement 2011 acres of fertile 
land ; it is situated on the river Trent, and is inter- 
sected by the road from Newark to Southwell and 
Mansfield ; the scenery is pleasing, and the village, 
with the church, which is on the margin of the river, 
forms a beautiful object in the landscape. The living is 
a rectory, with that of Kelham annexed in 1755, valued 
in the king's books at 20 ; patron, J. H. M. Sutton, 
Esq. The tithes of Averham have been commuted for 
a rent-charge of 787, and the glebe comprises nearly 
58 acres. The church is a very handsome structure, in 
the early English style, with a square embattled tower, 
built by Sir Thomas Sutton in 1495. There are some 
remains of a Roman camp and a watch-tower on 
Michael Barrow hill. 

AVETON-GIFFORD (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in 
the union of KINGSBRIDGE, hundred of ERMINGTON, 
Ermington and Plympton, and S. divisions of DEVON, 
3 miles (S. E.) from Modbury ; containing 1057 in- 
habitants. It is situated on the river Avon, which is 
navigable to the English Channel, and over which is a 
bridge, on the road leading to South Enford. The Jords 
of the manor had formerly the power of inflicting 
capital punishment. The living is a rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 38. 1. 8.; net income, 586 ; 
patron, James Pitman, Esq. The church is an ancient 
structure, in the early style of English architecture, 
with later additions. 

AVILLE, a hamlet, in the parish of DUNSTER, 
union of WILLITON, hundred of CARHAMPTON, W. 
division of SOMERSET ; containing 17 inhabitants. 

AVINGTON, a parish, in the union of HUNGER- 
FORD, hundred of KINTBURY-EAGLE, county of BERKS, 
2 miles (E. by S.) from Hungerford ; containing 93 in- 
habitants, and comprising 1 143a. Ir, 3p. The living is 
a rectory, valued in the king's books at 8, and in the 



A W N B 



A X B R 



patronage of Sir Francis Burdett, Bart. : the tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 299. 10., 
and the glebe consists of 6 acres. The church exhibits 
a curious specimen of Norman architecture, having an 
arch separating the chancel from the nave, with an 
obtuse depending point in the centre : the font, which 
is also of Norman design, is adorned with sculptured 
figures under arches. 

AVINGTON (Sr. MARY), a parish, in the hundred 
of FAWLEY, Winchester and N. divisions of the county 
of SOUTHAMPTON, 4^ miles (N. E. by E.) from Win- 
chester ; containing 204 inhabitants. Avington House, 
the mansion of the Duke of Buckingham, is situated 
near the bank of the river Itchen, in a demesne taste- 
fully laid out : near the house are some fine old trees, 
and the sloping grounds behind it are embellished with 
thriving plantations. Charles II., while engaged in his 
projected palace at Winchester, spent much of his time 
here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books 
at 11. 11. 10^., and in the patronage of the Bishop of 
Winchester : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 264. 13. 6., and the glebe comprises about 
25 acres. A school is supported by the Duchess of 
Buckingham. 

AVON, a tything, in the parish of SOPLEY, union 
and hundred of CHRISTCHURCH, Ringwood and S. 
divisions of HANTS ; containing 207 inhabitants. 

AVON, a hamlet, in the parish of STRATFORD- 
UNDER-THE-CASTLE, union of ALDERBURY, hundred of 
UNDERDITCH, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions 
of WILTS; containing 23 inhabitants. 

AVON, a tything, in the parish of CHRISTIAN- 
MALFORD, union and hundred of CHIPPENHAM, Chip- 
penharn and Calne, and N. divisions of WILTS, 3 
miles (N. E.) from Chippenham ; containing 76 in- 
habitants. 

AVON-DASSET. See DASSET, AVON. 

AWBRIDGE, a hamlet, in the parish of MITCHEL- 
MERSH, union of ROMSEY, hundred of BUDDLESGATE, 
Rornsey and S. divisions of the county of SOUTHAMPTON ; 
containing 345 inhabitants. 

AWLISCOMBE (ST. MICHAEL), a parish, in the 
union of HONITON, hundred of HEMYOCK, Honiton and 
N. divisions of DEVON, 2 miles (W. by N.) from Honi- 
ton ; containing 590 inhabitants. It comprises 2127 
acres by measurement, and is bounded by the river 
Otter on the south ; the surface is hilly, and the soil 
in general a rich productive marl, chiefly laid out in 
pasture. The living, which before the Dissolution was 
attached to the abbey at Tavistock, is a discharged 
vicarage, valued in the king's books at 12. 10. 10. ; 
patron, Duke of Bedford ; impropriators, the family of 
Drewe. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for a 
rent-charge of 200, and 170 are paid to the trustees 
of Kelland's charity ; the glebe consists of 30 acres, 
with a house. The church, which is in the later English 
style, was erected about the time of Henry VI., and has 
a handsome stone screen, and a magnificent window, 
finely ornamented : it is in excellent order, having been 
repaired in 1S38, at an expense of nearly 500. There 
are two schools, supported by subscription. The re- 
mains of a large encampment, supposed to be Roman, 
called Hembury fort, are in the parish. 

AWNBY, with HOLYWELL, a chapelry, in the 
parish of BYTHAM-CASTLE, union of BOURNE, wapen- 
112 



take of BELTISLOE, parts of KESTEVEN, county of LIN- 
COLN, 5 miles (N. by W.) from Stamford ; containing 
98 inhabitants. The tithes and rnoduses were commuted 
for land and a money payment, in 1801. 

AWRE (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union of 
WESTBURY, hundred of BLEDISLOE, W. division of the 
county of GLOUCESTER ; containing, with Blakeney, a 
post-town in the parish, and the tythings of Awre, 
Bledisloe, Hagloe, and Etloe, 1277 inhabitants. This 
parish, which is intersected by the road from Gloucester 
to Chepstow, forms a promontory of the river Severn, 
and comprises 4082 acres by admeasurement ; the port 
of Gatcomb, and a town named Pomerton once included 
within it, do not now exist. The living is a vicarage, 
valued in the king's books at 10. 5,, and in the pa- 
tronage of the Haberdashers' Company, London : the 
impropriate tithes belong to the company, and have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 400, and the vicarial 
for 450. 7. ; the glebe consists of nearly 9 acres, and 
there is a glebe-house recently built. Besides the paro- 
chial church, there is a chapel of ease at Blakeney, 
where are also a Baptist chapel, and a national school. 
In the register, it is recorded that Thomas Sternhold 
and John Hopkins, who collected the metrical version 
of the Psalms, resided in the parish. 

AWSWORTH, a chapelry, in the parish of NUT- 
HALL, S. division of the wapentake of BROXTOW, N. 
division of the county of NOTTINGHAM, 7^ miles (N. W. 
by W.) from Nottingham ; containing 294 inhabitants. 
The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, 101; 
patron, the Rector. 

AXBRIDGE (ST. JOHN 
THE BAPTIST), a market- 
town and parish, having 
separate jurisdiction, and 
the head of a union, locally 
in the hundred of WINTER- 
STOKE, E.divisionofSoMER- 
SET, 18 miles (S. by W.) 
from Bristol, and 130 (W. by 
S.) from London ; contain- 
ing 1045 inhabitants. This 
place, which derives itsname 
from a bridge over the river Corporation Seal. 

Axe, was formerly the residence of some of the West 
Saxon monarchs, by whom it was invested with many 
privileges. The town is of mean appearance, and in- 
differently paved, but amply supplied with water. The 
chief occupation of the poorer class of inhabitants 
was the knitting of stockings, but that trade was de- 
stroyed by the introduction of machinery, and the 
prosperity of the town declined until a fresh impulse 
was given to it by the drainage of the adjacent levels, 
which so much increased the value of the property in 
the neighbourhood, that land which previously was 
reckoned worth only 2s. 6d., is now let for 5 and 6 
per acre. The navigation of the river Axe also has 
been greatly improved by an act obtained in 1S02, 
whereby it has been made toll-free. The market is on 
Saturday ; and fairs for cattle are held on Feb. 3rd, 
and March 25th, and day following. 

Axbridge received its first charter of incorporation 
from Philip and Mary in 1556, but it was superseded 
by one granted by Elizabeth, in 1598, the defects of 
which were supplied by a subsequent one of James I., 




AXMI 



AX M O 



and these two last have been the governing charters. 
The corporate body consists of a mayor, recorder, alder- 
man, eight capital burgesses or councillors, and an 
indefinite number of free burgesses ; and a bailiff, town- 
clerk and prothonotary, chamberlain, and several other 
officers are also appointed. The corporation hold a 
court of quarter-sessions, a court of pie poudre during 
the fairs, and, as lords of the manor, a court baron once a 
year, generally in October. A new guildhall and market- 
house has been erected by the corporation, at a cost, 
including the improvements connected with it, of about 
1800. Axbridge sent members to parliament in the 
23rd of Edward I., but discontinued in the 17th of 
Edward III., on petition of the burgesses. The parish 
comprises 541cr. 2r. 30p. of productive land ; and the 
Mendip hill, close to the town, abounds with limestone 
of excellent quality for building and for burning into 
lime. The LIVING is a discharged rectory, valued in 
the king's books at 11. 4. 4., and in the patronage of 
the Bishop of Bath and Wells : the tithes have been 
commuted for a rent-charge of 62. 3., and the glebe 
comprises 36 acres. The church is a very ancient struc- 
ture, occupying an elevated situation on the north- 
eastern side of the town, and supposed to have been 
erected by one of the West Saxon monarchs, two of 
whose statues formerly ornamented the tower. There 
is a place of worship for Wesleyans. About 100 per 
annum, arising from lands bequeathed by different in- 
dividuals, are applied to the relief of the poor. The 
union of Axbridge comprises 38 parishes and places, 
and contains a population of 32,206. Near the town is 
a mineral spring, which has been found efficacious in 
chronic diseases. 

AXFORD, a tything, in the parish and hundred of 
RAMSBTJRY, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divi- 
sions of WILTS, 3^ miles (E. N. E.) from Marlborough ; 
containing 485 inhabitants. 

AXMINSTER (ST. MARY), a market-town and 
parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of 
AXMINSTER, Honiton and S. divisions of DEVON, 25 
miles (E. by N.) from Exeter, and 147 (W. S. W.) from 
London, on the road to Exeter ; comprising the tyth- 
ings of Abbey, Beerhall, Shapwick, Stnallridge, Town, 
Trill, Uphay, Westwater, Weycroft, and Wyke ; and 
containing 2860 inhabitants, of whom 2139 are in the 
town. This place, of which the name is derived from 
its situation near the river Axe, and from a minster 
founded here by King Athelstan, was, in the time of the 
Saxons, a town of considerable importance, and the 
burial-place of many of their princes. In 1644, a con- 
flict took place in the vicinity, between the royalists and 
the parliamentarians, in which Sir Richard Cholmon- 
deley, who commanded the former, was slain. The 
TOWN, which is irregularly built, is pleasantly situated 
on the declivity of a hill, near the confluence of the 
rivers Axe and Yarty, over the former of which three 
bridges have been erected ; it is paved, partially lighted, 
and amply supplied with water from several good springs. 
Races are held in August at Shute hill, three miles dis- 
tant 5 and there are assemblies occasionally at the George 
hotel. The manufacture of carpets, which had been 
established for nearly a century, has been recently 
transferred to Wilton, and the only manufacture now 
carried on is that of tape. The parish produces stone 
of good quality for building, and for burning into lime. 
VOL. I. 113 



The market is on Saturday ; and fairs are held on the 
first Tuesday after April 25th, the first Wednesday after 
June 24th, and the first Wednesday after Oct. 10th. 
Courts leet and baron are held annually by the lord of 
the manor, at the former of which constables and other 
officers are appointed. The LIVING is a vicarage, with 
Kilmington and Membury annexed, valued in the king's 
books at 44. 6. 8.; net income, 975 ; patrons, Pre- 
bendaries of Warthill and Grendale in the Cathedral of 
York, as appropriators of the rectory, which is rated at 
40. 6. 8. The tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 670. 10., payable to the prebendaries, and 
of 608. 13. 4., payable to the vicar. The church is an 
ancient structure, of various styles ; the entrance is 
under a fine Norman arch richly moulded ; the interior 
is of the early English style, with later insertions ; and 
the pulpit and reading-desk are curiously carved. There 
are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and 
Roman Catholics. Twelve children are instructed in the 
parochial school, for the amount of benefactions made 
for that purpose. The poor law union of Axminster 
comprises 1 1 parishes and places in the county of 
Devon, and 6 in that of Dorset ; and contains a popula- 
tion of 20,585. About a mile south of the town, on the 
bank of the river Axe, are the remains of Newenham 
abbey, consisting of the chapel, kitchen, and other parts ; 
and, at the distance of three miles, is an intrenchment 
called Musbury Castle. 

AXMOUTH, a parish, in the union and hundred of 
AXMINSTER, Honiton and S. divisions of DEVON, 2f 
miles (S. by E.) from Colyton ; containing, with the 
extra-parochial liberty of Horsedown, 645 inhabitants. 
This place, from the numerous traces of Roman occupa- 
tion on the eastern bank of the river Axe, which inter- 
sects the parish, is supposed to have been the Moridunum 
of the Romans. The manor formerly belonged to the 
abbey of Syon, in Middlesex, and was given at the disso- 
lution by Henry VIII. to his queen Catharine Parr, as 
part of her dower, at whose death it reverted to the 
crown, and [was granted by Edward VI., in 1552, to 
Walter Erie, Esq. In the year 1839, a very remarkable 
and extensive subsidence of the surface took place about 
a mile and a half from the village, on the farms of Dow- 
lands and Bindon, near the coast. The parish contains 
3788a. 3r. 9p., of which the surface is beautifully diver- 
sified with hill and dale, and is in many parts highly 
picturesque j the soil on the hills is chalky, well adapted 
for corn and the pasturage of sheep, and that in the 
valleys is a strong clay and marl, and is excellent dairy 
land ; limestone and good building-stone are abundant. 
The village is situated near the mouth of the river Axe, 
which here falls into the English Channel j near its in- 
flux a commodious harbour has been recently constructed 
by Richard Hallet, Esq., which is accessible to coasting 
vessels of 200 tons' burthen. The living is a vicarage, 
endowed with one-third of the rectorial, and two-thirds 
of the vicarial tithes, valued in the king's books at 
22. 19- 2. ; net income, 230 ; patron, J. H. Hallet, 
Esq., who, with others, is impropriator of the remainder 
of the tithes. The glebe comprises 30 acres. The church 
is a very ancient Norman structure, having two Saxon 
arches, and a fine specimen of the zig-zag arch in the 
north porch, now converted into a vestry-room. On an 
extra-parochial estate of about 200 acres called Roos- 
down, in the centre of the parish, is a chapel endowed 

Q 



A YDO 



A YLE 



with certain lands from Queen Anne's Bounty, but no 
duty has been performed in it within the memory of 
man. On Hawksdown hill is a large encampment sup- 
posed to be of Roman or Danish origin. 

AYCLIFFE (Sr. ACCA), a parish, partly in the union 
of DARLINGTON, and partly in that of SEDGEFIELD, S. 
E. division of DARLINGTON ward, S. division of the 
county of DURHAM, 5 miles (N.) from Darlington ; con- 
taining 1372 inhabitants, of whom 823 are in the town- 
ship of Great Aycliffe. This place is supposed by 
Spelman to have been the ancient " Aclea," where synods 
were held in 782 and 789 ; and two old Saxon crosses 
lately discovered in the churchyard, apparently warrant 
that conjecture. The parish, which is situated in the 
southern portion of the county, comprises 10,716 acres 
of arable and pasture land, in nearly equal portions, and 
of which 2134 are within the township of Great Aycliffe ; 
the soil is tolerably fertile, and the meadows and pas- 
tures are rich ; magnesian limestone of very pure quality 
is found in abundance, and is extensively quarried. The 
village is pleasantly situated on the road from Darlington 
to Durham, and on the west bank of the river Skerne, 
on which are a spinning-mill, and a mill for the manu- 
facture of brown paper, but not now in use. The 
Clarence railway intersects the parish, and a branch from 
the main line joins the Stockton and Darlington railway 
within a distance of three-quarters of a mile ; and the 
Great North of England railway to Newcastle also skirts 
the village. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's 
books at 20, and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter 
of Durham : the tithes have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 386. 1. 8., payable to the vicar, 165. 3. 8., 
to the Dean and Chapter, and 238. 7. 2. to two eanon- 
ries in the Cathedral of Durham. The church is a very 
ancient structure, partly in the Norman, and partly in the 
early English style, and contains 500 sittings, of which 
70 are free ; the old porch has been restored, several 
new windows have been inserted, and the structure has 
been generally repaired. There is a good Church of 
England school in the township, which will contain 130 
scholars, and is supported by voluntary contributions. 

AYCLIFFE, SCHOOL, a township, in the parish of 
HEIGHINGTON, union of DARLINGTON, S. E. division of 
DARLINGTON ward, S. division of the county of DUR- 
HAM, 7i miles (N. by W.) from Darlington ; containing 
25 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Scholacley, 
gave name to a resident family, of whom John de Scho- 
lacley died in 1350 ; it was a manor belonging to the 
Nevills, and was granted, in 1411, by Lord Nevill to 
Robert de Binchester, to be held of the bishop by military 
service, suit at the head courts of the county, and a pay- 
ment yearly to the Durham exchequer. The vicarial tithes 
have been commuted for a rent-charge of 74. 16. 

AYDON, a township, in the parish of CORBRIDGE, 
union of HEXHAM, E. division of TINDALE ward, S. 
division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 5^ miles (E. by N.) from 
Hexham ; containing 83 inhabitants. It is said by some 
to have derived its name from Aidon, which in the 
British language signifies a wing or troop of horse, many 
of which were stationed near the great wall. The Reed 
family once occupied a good house and a small estate 
here ; at present several families have land in the town- 
ship. Lead-ore and coal exist, but in very small quan- 
tities. Several Roman relics have been found, including 
two urns, the effigy of a human being, &c. 
114 



AYDON-CASTLE, a township, in the parish of 
CORBRIDGE, union of HEXHAM, E. division of TINDALE 
ward, S. division of NORTHUMBERLAND, 6^ miles (E. by 
N.) from Hexham ; containing 25 inhabitants. The 
castle, which gives name to the township, stands on the 
west side of a deep precipice, at the foot of which runs 
a small rivulet ; it appears to have been of great extent 
and strength, and was encompassed by an outer wall, in 
which the loop-holes still remain. For several genera- 
tions Ayton belonged to the baronial family of Aydon, or 
Ayton, and was anciently part of the barony of Hugh de 
Baliol : in 1272, it was the seat of Emma de Aydon, an 
heiress, who intermarried with Peter de Walles, and was 
subsequently partly possessed by the Kaymes, of Bolam ; 
it afterwards became the estate of the families of Collin- 
son and Douglas, from which latter the castle and manor 
descended to the Blacketts, of Matfen, and is now the 
property of Sir Edward Blackett, Bart. The fortress 
was destroyed by the Scots during their inroad into 
England, which ended in their defeat at the battle of 
Nevill's Cross, in 1346. 

AYLBURTON, a chapelry, in the parish of LIDNEY, 
union of CHEPSTOW, hundred of BLEDISLOE, W. division 
of the county of GLOUCESTER, 4^ miles (S. W. by W.) 
from Blakeney ; containing 468 inhabitants. The chapel 
is dedicated to St. Mary. 

AYLESBEAR (ST. CHRISTOPHER), a parish, in the 
union of ST. THOMAS, hundred of EAST BUDLEIGH, 
Woodbury and S. divisions of DEVON, 8 miles (E.) from 
Exeter ; containing, with the tything of Newton-Popple- 
ford, 982 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 
2701 acres, of which 1033 are arable, 823 meadow and 
pasture, 92 orchard, 53 coppice, and 700 common or 
waste land ; and is bounded on the east by the river 
Otter : the surface is hilly, and the soil divided between 
a stiff cold clay and light sand. There is a silk and 
ribbon manufactory. The living is a discharged vicarage, 
with the perpetual curacy of Newton-Poppleford annexed, 
valued in the king's books at 16. 2. 4.; net income, 
123 j patron and incumbent, Rev. H. W. Marker, to 
whom, and the rector of Huxham, the impropriation 
belongs. The glebe contains about 44 acres. There is 
a chapel at Newton-Poppleford, of modern architecture, 
rebuilt in 1826, by subscription. 

AYLESBURY (ST. MARY), a borough, market-town, 
parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of 
AYLESBURY, county of BUCKINGHAM, of which it is the 
county town, 16^ miles (S. E. by S.) from Buckingham, 
and 38 (N. W. by W.) from London, by Watford ; con- 
taining, with the hamlet of Walton, 5429 inhabitants. 
This place appears to have been one of the strongest 
fortresses possessed by the ancient Britons, from whom 
it was taken in the year 571, by Cutwulph, brother of 
Ceawlin, King of the West Saxons, and to have had a 
castle of some importance, from which circumstance 
probably it derives its Saxon appellation Aeglesburge, of 
which its present name is only a slight modification. 
In the reign of the Conqueror this was a royal manor, 
and some lands here were granted by that monarch, 
upon the extraordinary tenure that the owners should 
provide straw for the monarch's bed, sweet herbs for his 
chamber, and two green geese and three eels for his 
table, whenever he should visit Aylesbury. In the civil 
war of the seventeenth century, the town was garrisoned 
for the parliament ; but it does not appear to have had 



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any further connexion with the political transactions of 
that period. 

The TOWN is pleasantly situated on a gentle eminence, 
in a fertile vale, extending from Thame, in Oxfordshire, 
to Leighton, in Bedfordshire, and is lighted with gas, and 
paved under the direction of a body called " the Incor- 
porated Surveyors," who derive their funds from land 
and houses devised by John Bedford for that purpose ; 
the inhabitants are amply supplied with water. The 
houses are principally of brick, and the town has been 
greatly improved by the erection of some handsome 
private residences at the entrances into it from London 
and Buckingham ; and the approaches have been ren- 
dered pleasant and commodious by the construction of 
a new road. The only manufacture is that of bone lace, 
which is carried on upon a very limited scale. Duck- 
lings and tame rabbits are bred in great numbers, for 
the supply of the London market. The market, which 
is amply supplied, is on Saturday ; and fairs are held on 
the Friday after the 18th of Jan., the Saturday before 
Palm-Sunday, May 8th, June 14th, Sept. 25th, and 
Oct. 12th 3 those in Jan., May, and Oct. not being 
chartered, are free from toll, and those in Sept. and 
Oct. are also for hiring servants. The river Thame, which 
separates the town from the hamlet of Walton, is not navi- 
gable ; but a canal, which commences at the hamlet, com- 
municates with the Grand Junction canal at Marsworth. 
The branch railway from this town, to the London and 
Birmingham line near Leighton Buzzard, was opened -in 
June 1839, and is one continued level throughout, seven 
miles in length. There is a florists' and horticultural 
society, which from its foundation has been liberally 
supported, and has produced some fine shows of flowers 
and fruit. 

The inhabitants received their first CHARTER from 
Queen Mary, in the year 1554, but the corporation soon 
lost their privileges, by neglecting to fill up vacancies, 
and the town is now within the jurisdiction of the county 
magistrates, who hold petty-sessions daily ; and con- 
stables and other officers are appointed at the court leet 
of the lord of the manor. The elective franchise was 
conferred in ] 554, and notwithstanding the loss of its 
charter, the borough has continued, since that time, to 
return two members to parliament. The right of elec- 
tion was originally vested in the corporation alone ; and 
in the reign of Queen Anne, a disputed return for this 
place, in the cause of Ashby v. White, occasioned so 
serious a contest between the two houses, respecting 
the power of electors to bring actions against returning 
officers, for refusing to receive their votes, that the 
queen was obliged to prorogue the parliament, leaving 
the case undecided. After the loss of the charter, the 
two members were elected by the pot-wallopers ; and 
in 1804, in a case of notorious bribery, an act was 
passed, extending the right of voting to the freeholders 
of the three hundreds of Aylesbury. The constables are 
the returning officers. The Lent assizes, and the quarter- 
sessions for the county, are held, and the knights of the 
shire elected, here. The county hall, with the magi- 
strates' chamber, and offices of the clerk of the peace, 
form one range of brick building, of modern erection, 
with the county gaol and house of correction, which 
is well adapted to the classification of prisoners. 

The LIVING is a discharged vicarage, valued in the 
king's books at 24. 18. 1.5 net income, 318; patron, 
115 



Prebendary of Aylesbury in the Cathedral of Lincoln. 
The great tithes have been commuted for land : the 
vicar also has a house and garden, with two plots of 
land in lieu of tithes ; and an annual stipend of 20 is 
payable to the prebendary, according to an act of par- 
liament. An afternoon lecture, long supported by sub- 
scription, was endowed by the Marquess of Bucking- 
ham, about the close of the last century, with a rent- 
charge of 18, in consideration of which the vicar has 
for many years given a third service. The church is an 
ancient cruciform structure, in the decorated English 
style, with some earlier portions, and a low central 
tower ; the western entrance is very rich : on the north 
side of the chancel is a chantry chapel, now used as a 
vestry-room, in which are still remaining some traces of 
Norman character ; and on the south side is another 
chantry chapel, now used for the grammar school. From 
the number of Roman tiles still found in several parts 
of the building, it is probable that a tessellated pave- 
ment originally constituted the floor of the whole. There 
are places of worship for the Society of Friends, Inde- 
pendents, and Wesleyans, and one for Particular Bap- 
tists in the hamlet of Walton. 

The Free Grammar School was founded by Sir Henry 
Lee, Knt., about the year 1611, and endowed with about 
8 per annum, which was greatly augmented by Henry 
Phillips, Esq., who, by will in 1714, left 5000 in trust 
to be invested in land for its support : the property 
consists of a manor and estate at Broughton-Abbots, in 
the parish of Bierton, and upwards of 1800 in the 
three per cent, consols., producing together an income 
of about 540. The school premises, erected in 1719, 
comprise a long range of building adjoining the church- 
yard, and contain under one roof the reading and writ- 
ing schools, and residences for the masters. There is 
also a British school, supported by subscription. Thomas 
Hickman, in 1695, bequeathed land and houses (of which 
five are occupied as almshouses), now let for 73 per 
annum, which, after defraying the expenses of repairs 
and other small charges, is distributed among decayed 
tradesmen and tradesmen's widows not receiving paro- 
chial relief. William Harding, of Walton, by his will 
proved in 1719, devised certain lands and tenements, 
now let for 289 per annum, by means of which about 
fourteen children of the parish are apprenticed annually, 
with premiums of 20 each ; and there are also several 
charities for different purposes under the management 
of the churchwardens. A county infirmary, erected at 
the northern end of the town, chiefly through the exer- 
tions of John Lee, Esq., of Hartwell House, was opened 
for the reception of patients on the 23rd of October, 1833, 
and is a spacious building, consisting of a centre and 
two wings, the former of stone, and the latter of brick 
stuccoed in imitation of stone. The poor law union of 
Aylesbury comprises 40 parishes and places, and con- 
tains a population of 22,134. A monastery was founded 
here, about the year 600, and dedicated to St. Osyth ; 
and there were also two ancient hospitals for lepers, 
dedicated respectively to St. John and St. Leonard, 
which had fallen into decay prior to the year 1360. A 
convent for Grey Friars, the only one in the county, was 
established in 1387, by James, Earl of Ormond : its 
site was subsequently occupied by a mansion belonging 
to Sir John Baldwin, Knt., lord chief justice of the 
common pleas ; but during the civil war the house 

Q2 



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A YLS 



sustained so much damage, that it has never since heen 
inhabited as a seat by any private gentleman. The cele- 
brated John Wilkes resided here for a long time, and 
for some years represented the borough in parliament. 
The place gives the titles of Earl and Marquess to the 
ancient family of Bruce. 

AYLESBY (Sr. LAWRENCE), a parish, in the union 
of CAISTOR, wapentake of BRADLEY-HAVERSTOE, parts 
of LINDSEY, county of LINCOLN, 5 miles (W. by S.) 
from Great Grimsby; containing 201 inhabitants. This 
parish, which is intersected by the road from Grimsby 
to Brigg, comprises by computation 2000 acres, on 
which there are several plantations, but the greater por- 
tion of the land is arable. The living is a perpetual 
curacy ; net income, 73 ; patron and incumbent, Rev. 
T. T. Drake. The appropriate tithes have been com- 
muted for a rent-charge of 537. 6. 8., and there are 
36 acres of appropriate glebe. The church is an ancient 
structure with a tower, on the outside of which, near 
the summit, are two large elder-trees which bear fruit, 
and are flourishing. 

AYLESFORD (ST. PETER), a parish, in the union of 
MALLING, hundred of LARKFIELD, lathe of AYLESFORD, 
W. division of KENT, 3^ miles (N. N. W.) from Maid- 
stone ; containing 1344 inhabitants. This place was 
called Saissenaighobail by the Britons, in commemora- 
tion of their having here defeated the Saxons ; and by 
the latter, after their settlement in the country, Eagles- 
ford, of which the present name is a corruption. In the 
battle above mentioned, which took place in 455, Horsa, 
the brother of Hengist, on the side of the Saxons, and 
Catigern, the son of Vortigern, on the side of the Bri- 
tons, were slain. In 893, Alfred defeated the Danes at 
Fenham, in the parish ; and in 1016, Edmund Ironside, 
in a fierce encounter with those invaders, pursued them 
to this place with great slaughter, and drove them hence 
to Sheppy. In 1240, Ralph Frisburn, on his return from 
the Holy Land, founded a Carmelite monastery, under 
the patronage of Richard, Lord Grey, of Codnor, many 
parts of which are entire, though the greater portion of 
the site is occupied by a mansion, erected by Sir William 
Sedley, and now the residence of the Earl of Aylesford. 
The parish contains 4260a. 2r. 29/>., of which 1721 acres 
are arable, 628 meadow and pasture, 1428 woodland, 
152 hop plantations, 53 orchards, and about 196 com- 
mon and waste ; the surface is intersected with numer- 
ous chalk hills ; in the northern part the soil is various, 
but the southern part, which is often overflowed by the 
Medway, is loam and gravel. The substratum abounds 
with stone, which is quarried for building sea-walls and 
for the roads ; the river Medway, which is navigable for 
barges, flows through the parish. The town is plea- 
santly situated on the north-east bank of the river, over 
which is an ancient stone bridge of six arches, and con- 
sists of one principal street, on the north side of which 
the ground rises abruptly to an elevation of 100 feet. 
A paper-mill, by the side of a small stream, is the only 
manufactory in the place. A pleasure fair is held on the 
29th of June. 

The LIVING is a vicarage, valued in the king's books 
at 10 ; patrons and appropriators, Dean and Chapter 
of Rochester. The rectorial tithes have been commuted 
for a rent-charge of 630. 15. 3., and the vicarial for 
597. 11- 3. ; and the glebe contains 14 acres, with a 
house. The church is an ancient structure, and contains 
116 



monuments to the memory of Sir Paul Rycaut, Sir John 
Colepepper, and Sir Caleb Banks. There is a place of 
worship for Wesleyans. A school was endowed, in 1766, 
by Charles Milner, Esq. with a rent-charge of 20 ; 
the schoolroom was built in 1773. There is also a 
national school, established in 1832. An hospital, dedi- 
cated to the Holy Trinity, was founded in 16 17, fora 
warden and six aged persons, by Sir William Sedley, Knt., 
partly in performance of the will of his brother, John, 
dated in 1605, and partly of his own free gift ; and 
endowed with two farms in the parish of Frittenden, 
now let for 135 per annum. Fragments of military 
weapons are frequently discovered here. At Horsted is 
a monument of upright stones, erected, as it is supposed, 
to the memory of Horsa ; and three miles distant is 
another, called Kit's Cotty House, to the memory of 
Catigern, brother of Vortimer, who was slain with 
that prince in the battle with Hengist and Horsa. Sir 
Charles Sedley, a celebrated wit and poet in the reign 
of Charles II., was born at the Stoars, in the parish. 
Aylesford confers the title of Earl on the family of 
Finch. 

AYLESTONE (ST. ANDREW), a parish, in the union 
of BLABY, partly in the hundred of GUTHLAXTON, and 
partly in that of SPARKENHOE, S. division of the county 
of LEICESTER, 2^ miles (S. by W.) from Leicester; con- 
taining, with the township of Glen Parva and the cha- 
pelry of Lubbesthorpe, 757 inhabitants. It is situated 
on the road to Lutterworth, and contains, with Lub- 
besthorpe, about 2700 acres ; the Duke of Rutland is 
lord of the manor. The Union canal passes through 
the parish, and soon after joins the river Soar, which here 
becomes navigable. The living is a rectory, valued 
in the king's books at 31. 8. ll. ; net income, 845 ; 
patron, Duke of Rutland. The tithes were commuted 
for 350 acres of land, in 1767. 

AYLMERTON(Sr. JOHN THE BAPTIST), a parish, in 
the union of ERPINGHAM, hundred of NORTH ERPING- 
HAM, E. division of NORFOLK, 2f miles (W. S. W.) from 
Cromer; containing 289 inhabitants. This parish, which 
is intersected by the road from Cromer to Holt, com- 
prises 1581a. Sp., of which 916 acres are arable, 190 
pasture and meadow, and 470 woodland and water ; the 
views of the ocean from the high grounds are exceed- 
ingly fine, and the scenery very picturesque. The living 
is a discharged rectory in medieties, with those of Fel- 
brigg, Melton, and Runton united, valued together in 
the king's books at 6. 11. ; net income, 370; patron 
and lord of the manor, W. H. Windham, Esq. The 
tithes of Aylmerton have been commuted for a rent- 
charge of 220, and the glebe consists of 41^ acres. 
The church is in the decorated and perpendicular styles, 
with an embattled tower ; in the interior is a handsome 
carved screen, and on the south side of the chancel a 
piscina and two stone stalls. 

AYLSHAM (ST. MICHAEL), a market-town and 
parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of SOUTH 
ERPINGHAM, E. division of NORFOLK, 12^ miles (N. by 
W.) from Norwich, and 121 (N. E. by N.) from London; 
containing 2448 inhabitants. This place, which is situ- 
ated on the high road from Norwich to Cromer, was, 
during the reigns of Edward II. and III., the chief seat 
in the county for the manufacture of linens, then dis- 
tinguished by the appellation of " A.ylsham Webs." This 
branch of manufacture was subsequently superseded by 



A Y L T 



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that of woollen cloths ; and in the time of James I. the 
inhabitants were principally employed in the knitting of 
worsted hose, and in the manufacture of stocking-pieces 
for breeches, and waistcoat-pieces, which was carried on 
here till the introduction of machinery. The town is 
pleasantly situated on a gentle acclivity rising from the 
south bank of the river Bure, and is well built, containing 
many handsome houses ; the trade consists for the most 
p'art in corn, coal, and timber, for which its situation 
is extremely favourable. The river Bure is navigable to 
Yarmouth for barges of 40 tons' burthen, and a spacious 
basin and commodious wharfs have been constructed 
here for the greater facility of trade. The market, for- 
merly on Saturday, is now on Tuesday, and is amply 
supplied with corn and provisions of all kinds ; and 
fairs, which are well attended, are held on March 23rd, 
and on the last Tuesdays in Sept. and Oct., which last 
is a statute fair. The town was formerly governed by 
a bailiff, and had several privileges, of which exemption 
from serving on juries at the assizes and sessions is still 
remaining. 

The parish comprises 431 la. 2r. 4p., of which 350 
acres are meadow, 100 woodland and plantations, and 
the remainder arable. The LIVING is a vicarage, en- 
dowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued 
in the king's books at 17. 19- 7- ; patrons and appro- 
priators, Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. The great 
tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of 716, and 
the vicarial for 684 ; the glebe comprises 4 acres, with a 
house. The church, founded by John of Gaunt, is a 
spacious and handsome cruciform structure, in the de- 
corated English style, with a square embattled tower 
surmounted by a spire ; on the south side of the choir 
are three sedilia of stone, richly canopied, and a double 
piscina, opposite to which is a monument to Bishop 
Jeggon ; the font is elaborately sculptured, and in the 
north transept is the chapel of St. Peter, which had a 
guild in 1490 ; in the cemetery is the tomb of Hum- 
phrey Repton, author of a work on landscape gardening, 
who was buried here. There are places of worship for 
Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans. The 
free grammar school, founded in 15 17 by Robert Jannys, 
mayor of Norwich, who endowed it with 10 per annum, 
and for which, in conjunction with that of Wymondham, 
Archbishop Parker founded two scholarships in Corpus 
Christi College, Oxford, has been incorporated with the 
District National Society. The poor law union of 
Aylsham comprises 46 parishes and places under the 
care of 47 guardians, and contains a population of 
20,056. About half a mile from the town is a chaly- 
beate spring, now little noticed, which, from its former 
efficacy in asthmatic and other chronic diseases, was 
much resorted to by invalids, and obtained the appella- 
tion of Aylsham spa. On Stowe heath, about two miles 
to the east of the town, are several large tumuli, in some 
of which, in 1808, were found urns containing human 
bones and ashes. 

AYLTON, a parish, in the union of LEDBURY, hun- 
dred of RADLOW, county of HEREFORD, 4^ miles (W.) 
from Ledbury ; containing 69 inhabitants, and consist- 
ing of 812 acres, undulated, with a full proportion of 
wood, arid the soil of the highest average fertility. 
The living is a discharged perpetual curacy, endowed 
with one-third of the tithes, and valued in the king's 
books at 3. 3. 4. ; net income, 149 ; patron, Earl of 
117 



Oxford ; impropriators of the remainder of the tithes, 
the Portionists of Ledbury church. 

AYMESTREY (ST. JOHN AND ST. ALKMUND), a 
parish, in the union of LEOMINSTER, consisting of the 
townships of Conhope and Over Lye, in the hundred 
of STRETFORD, and the townships of Aymestrey, Mor- 
timer's- Cross, Nether Lye, Shirley, and Yatton, and 
the chapelry of Leinthall-Earls, in the hundred of 
WIGMORE, county of HEREFORD, 8 miles (N. W.) from 
Leominster ; containing 958 inhabitants. This parish, 
which is intersected by the river Lug, comprises by 
computation 5721 acres, of which 1926 are arable, 2355 
meadow and pasture, 1405 woodland, and about 35 gar- 
den ground : limestone abounds in the vicinity. The 
living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books 
at 7. 14. 2., and in the patronage o